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CORNELC 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 


Cornell  University  Library 
F  472.R15W19 


History  of  Randolph  County,  "'f  so"''' ' 


3  1924  009  546  767    .i»....i 


Cornell  University 
Library 


The  original  of  this  book  is  in 
the  Cornell  University  Library. 

There  are  no  known  copyright  restrictions  in 
the  United  States  on  the  use  of  the  text. 


http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924009546767 


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HISTORY 


OF 


Randolph  County 


MISSOURI 


ALEXANDER  H.  WALLER 


ILLUSTRATED 


HISTORICAL  PUBLISHING  COMPANY, 

TOPBKA                              CLEVELAND 

A 

1920' 

(  :,-:'r  , , 

"^ 

^ 

^'//, .nv^^-    • .: 

PREFACE 


History  is  a  record  of  human  events,  the  personal  element  ever  being 
present.  Men  perform  their  allotted  work  upon  this  earth  and  then  depart. 
Others  follow  to  take  up  the  work  left  unfinished  by  those  who  have  pre- 
ceded them.  It  was  ordained  by  an  omnipotent  and  omniscient  Providence 
that  it  should  be  the  task  of  His  creatures  here  below  to  go  forth  into, 
subdue,  and  people  the  waste  places  of  the  earth,  the  forests,  and  the 
plains;  to  change  the  wide  spaces  of  land  into  fertile  areas  so  as  to  pro- 
vide sustenance  for  mankind.  The  vanguard  were  the  pioneers,  men  and 
women,  accustomed  to  simple  methods  of  living,  inured  to  hardships,  bred 
to  a  life  which  required  that  they  wrest  a  livelihood  from  the  soil,  and 
imbued  with  the  spirit  of  generations  of  pioneers.  They  accomplished 
their  self-imposed  task  and  subdued  the  lands  of  what  is  now  known  as 
Randolph  county.  They  paved  the  pathway  for  others  who  followed  to 
resume  the  task  of  making  a  happy  and  prosperous  community.  Their 
work  was  well  and  faithfully  done  and  this  volume  of  Randglph  county 
history  might  fittingly  be  dedicated  to  the  memory  of  those  brave  men 
and  women. 

Lest  we  forget,  lest  the  children  of  today  and  of  the  tomorrows  know 
not  the  deeds  of  their  progenitors,  this  history  has  been  written  and  pub- 
lished— affording  an  authentic  and  readable  record  for  all  time  to  come, 
the  story  of  the  settlement  and  upbuilding  of  Randolph  county. 

History  has  been  and  is  now  being  made.  The  great  task  of  founding 
and  creating  an  important  sub-division  of  the  great  commonwealth  pf 
Missouri  has  been  accomplished.  The  future  will  bring  forth  still  greater 
development.  That  this  is  possible  is  due  to  the  bravery  and  hardihood  of 
that  noble  race  who  have  preceded  the  present  generation  and  who  lie 
sleeping  peacefully  beneath  the  sod  they  loved  so  well. 

The  following  pages  present  a  history  of  Randolph  co'unty,  based  upon 
personal  narratives,  research,  compilation,  and  official  records.  Inasmuch 
as  history  in  the  aggregate  is  a  record  of  the  composite  achievements  of 
all  the  people  in  a  community  during  a  course  of  many  years,  it  is  neces- 
sary to  present  much  personal  history  in  a  work  of  this  kind. 


True  history  is  based  upon  personal  achievement.  True  history,  then, 
in  its  wider  sense  is  but  biography.  The  biographical  department  of  this 
history  of  Randolph  county,  therefore,  is  important,  as  presenting  a  record 
of  the  leading  families  of  Randolph  county  and  recording  the  personal 
achievements  of  the  men  and  women  who  have  made  Randolph  county 
what  it  is  today.  In  the  publishing  of  this  important  department  which 
is  destined  for  the  enlightenment  of  the  present  and  future  generations  as 
to  the  best  information  available,  concerning  their  forbears,  and  no  effort 
has  been  spared  to  insure  accuracy  without  exaggeration. 

In  the  preparation  of  this  work  it  has  been  the  aim  of  the  writer  to 
present  the  salient  facts  and  the  important  events  bearing  upon  the  story 
of  the  settlement  and  early  development  of  the  county.  Many  events,  of  a 
seemingly  remote  character,  had  an  influence  in  shaping  the  destiny  and 
moulding  the  future  of  Randolph  county,  and  it  is  hoped  that  the  present 
and  future  generations  may  derive  some  benefit  from  the  effort  that  has 
been  put  forth  here  in  the  way  of  a  modest  contribution  to  the  annals  of 
this  splendid  county. 

ALEXANDER  H.  WALLER. 

Moberly,  Mo.,  August  1,  192(?. 


INDEX 


^dams,  Carson  L. 755 

Adams,  Samuel  B. 751 

Adams,  Simon  F.   525 

Agee,  W.  E.  444 

Alexander,  John    D.    689 

Alexander,  John  W. 487 

Allen,  John  P. 678 

Allen,  R.    M. 283 

Arllne,  A.  A.  797 

Asbell,  Alguin  S.   600 

Ash,  I>avid  P.  652 

Ash,  Ottis  O.  225 

Ashcom,  Benjamin  H. 581 

Bagby,  James  H.   514 

Bagby,  Thomas  J.   699 

Bailey,  Harry  P.   530 

Baird,  Edward  T. 310 

Baird,  William  H.  778 

Baker,  David  F.,  Jr 825 

Balzar,  J.    W.    410 

Bank  of  Moberly  255 

Barclay,  Christopher  C.   826 

Barlow,   Alfred  780 

Barr,  Warren  L.   704 

Bassett,  Church   A.    771 

Bassett,  Homer   509 

Bassett,  Robert    H.    507 

Baugh,   Willis   324 

Bazan,  L.  A. 305 

Bazan,  Theodore    B.    306 

Bell  Brothers 342 

Bennett,  Charles  B. 396 

Bennett,  _George 690 

Bennett,  James   690 

Benton,  David  S.  566 

Benton,  John  H. 810 

Bierman,  Morris 321 

Blake,  Charles  D. 765 

Bledsoe,  John  A.   464 

Blood,  E.    O.    389 

Blood,  G.  N.  389 

Bobbitt,   William   A 692 

Boland,  John  M. 833 

Boney,  A.  T. 377 


Boney,  James   T.    375 

Boucher,  Orion  V.  769 

Bowers,  Jacob   S.   322 

Bowers,  William  S'. 323 

Braddick,  G.  F. 631 

Bradley,  Dudley  T. 576 

Bradley,  Joseph  W. 834 

Bragg,  General  Grant 586 

■Brawley,  William    R.    842 

Brooks,  James  R. 666 

Brooks,  Obediah    812 

Brown,  Charles  C.  597 

Brown,  S.   B.   669 

Buchanan,   Walter  C.   337 

Bundridge,  J.  W.  234 

Bundridge,  V.    E.    235 

Burckhartt,  G.  Dorsey 743 

Burckhartt,  George  H.   744 

Burke,  Edmund 568 

Burke,  M.    W.    750 

Burkhalter,  Charles  F. 483 

Burkley,  Andrew  J. 531 

Burklund,  Leslie  G. 302 

Burton,  Ambrose   C.    ?>09 

Burton,  Asa  T.   789 

Burton,  Henry     t)84 

Burton,  Henry   M.   659 

Burton,  Medley     498 

Busch,  Theodore  Fred  312 

Butler,  W.  R. 327 

Bye,  George  E.  667 

Byrd,  William  F. 767 

Cairo,  Bank  of  -_J 378 

Campbell,  John  R.  715 

Campbell,  Richard  R.   j__  687 

Campbell,  Winfleld  S.  624 

Camplin.Robert  T.   548 

Caplinger,  Thomas  A.   338 

Capp,  A.   A.   307 

Carney,  P.  J.  376 

Carr'ell,  Richmond  R.   811 

Carter,  Joseph    C.    ^i>5 

Carter,  Joseph    F.    580 

Carter,  M.    A.    653 


BIOGRAPHICAL  INDEX. 


Cuter,  Richard    I..,    Jr 823 

Carter,  Richard   L.,    Sr 638 

Caulkins,   JI.    E.    668 

Cavanaugh,  Henry  B. 620 

Cave,   Willard  P.   226 

Cliamier,  Arthur  B. 453 

Chapman,   William   T.    672 

Chilton,   Z.   T.   I 501 

Christ,  Charles  P. 722 

Christian,  William  Paul 757 

Clapp,  Chambers   B.    275 

Cleveland,  Charles  B.  648 

Clifford,  William    C. 384 

Clifton  Hill   Banliing   Company 590 

Clifton,  William  D.   599 

Coates,  John   H.   319 

Cogley,  Edward  G. ^ 636 

Cottingham,  James    H.    533 

Cottingham,  Guy 509 

Cottingham,  Lane    736 

Cowan,  Mercer  B.  , 758 

Cox,  William   G.   398 

Creson,  S.    W.    281 

crews,  John    B.    802 

Crews,  Joseph    S.    804 

Crisler,  Charles  E.  406 

Cromwell,  William  O. 680 

Crose,  Homer    358 

Grose,  L.  M.   J___  617 

('rose,  11.    K.    356 

Crose.  S.    P,    356 

Cross,  .James  Tliomas ^ 200 

Crumrine,   Amos   L.   806 

Cubbage,  Henry    B.    741 

Cuppaidj-'e,   (lodfrc^v  O.   474 

Dameron,  S.    M.    42.". 

Dameron,  William   L.    .5.5!) 

Dameron,  William   T.    5.5.'! 

Daniels,  Charles  H.' ,S4.-| 

Darby,  John   L.   , 649 

Darby.  William   F.  528 

Davis,  (ieor.w   :\1.   848 

l>avis,  WilHam    It.    505 

Dawkins  Biotliers    442 

Dawkins,   William   C.    731 

Dawson,  Samuel  P.  827 

Day,  Winfred   E,    750 

Denny,  David    11.    "_ 774 

Deskin,  E.    G.    633 

Dpskin.  George   C.    646 


Dessert,  William  P. 492 

Dixon,  Charles    H.    462 

Dixon,  IJobert  R.   647 

.Dodson,  Charles   L.    290 

Dodson,  Thomas  B.   679 

Doyle,  Joseph   A.    571 

Duffy,  William    E.    411 

Dulany,  James  G.  557 

Dumont,  John   N.   760 

Dunn,  Julius    tii} 

Dunivent,  Wade  H.   421 

Dutton,  Charles   K.    473 

Eckard,  William    H.    805 

Eddings,  George  P.   316 

Edwards,  Cyrus    L.    579 

Edwards,  Roy    W. 239 

Edwards,  William   D.    499 

Egly,  William    494 

Elliott,  Alonzo    H.    655 

Elliott,  Asher  W.   655 

Elsea,  Felix   G.   713 

Embree,  C.   B.   400 

Emerson,  William    Henry    328 

Engle,  Henry   T.    B73 

Enslen,  James   C.    320 

Epperly,  Joshua   T.    793 

Epperson,  William  D.   766 

Eppiug,  Frank   J.   415 

I'lsry.  William   A.    592 

Eslill,  Frank    Hartley    265 

lOubauk,  .Tames  R.   429 

Eubank,  P.   B.   430 

Eubanks,  Harvey   C.    736 

Evans,  William    Ai.    573 

Kaessler,  .John    W.    4.54 

I'"aessler,  Louis   E.    46S 

Farmers   and   Jleclianic's  Bank 2.34 

Fennel,  William,    Sr.    280 

Fergu.son,  Audrew    J.    .582 

Fifer,   Harry   M.    535 

Pifer,  Walter  D. 684 

Finn,  John    W,    783 

1^'iorita,  T.    li.    291 

I<^eming,  Jacob    ('.    2S0 

Fleming,  Thomas  S. 247 

Fonioy.  Prank  B. 287 

Foi'ney,   I.     B.     245 

Forster,  Ed   M.    549 

Port,  Otto  H.  313 

Fountain.  Otis    , 540 


BIOGRAPHICAL   INDEX. 


Fowler,  James  A.  332 

Fowler,  Otto   S.    jsOS 

Frampton,  David   A.    711 

Fray,  Oswald  S.  u46 

Freeman,  John    839 

Freeman,  Timothy    813 

Freysleben,    Gustave    308 

Fullington,  Charles  P. i 630 

Galbreath,  Lee 309 

Galbreath,  Ray    326 

GilfiUin,  Harry   B.    1 ■±63 

Gipson,  George   E.    625 

Gladney,  AH)ert  C. 650 

Goddai-d,  John   M.    830 

Goodding,   William  W.   379 

Gould,  Robin  840 

Gowan,   George   839 

Graves,  J.  Will  595 

Greasa,  Charles  E. 643 

Grimes,  H.   A.    299 

Gross,  George  W. ol5 

Grotjan,  J.   A.   661 

Gutekunst,  Emil   273 

Hackley,  J.  S.   706 

Haden,  Tucker   G.    378 

Haines,  Evan     564 

Haley,   S.  L. 433 

Hall,  J.  Ereckson 651 

Halliburton,  Callie     575 

Halliburton,  George  D. 504 

Halliburton,  Orley    692 

Halloran,   Patrick   458 

Halterman,  Cyrus    520 

Halterman,  J.  A    W. '__-  686 

Hamilton,  John  N.  232 

Hamilton,  Ira    S.    513 

Hamilton,  Stephen  G.  537 

Hammett,  Aubrey   R.    331 

Hammett,  Clarence  J. 621 

Hammett,  Francis  JM.   613 

Hammett,  Jim  L.   742 

Hammett,  John  H. 613 

Harbaugh,  James  E.   761 

Hardin,  John  H. 510 

Hare,  David  S.   !" 489 

Harlan,  Ira    F.    314 

Harlan,  Lee   Smith   ^ 588 

Harmon,  Henry    849 

Harris,  C.  J.  Lumber  Company 368 

Harvey,  Frank   B.    333 


Hatton,  O.    F.    623 

Haworth,  Harry  H. 734 

Haworth,  Nathaniel  F. 732 

Haynes,  Carl    781 

Haynes,  Finis   Ewing   790 

Haynes,  Sidney    H.    749 

Haynes,  William  J.   846 

Heddinghaus  Frank  B. 445 

Hedges,  James  S'.,  Jr 654 

Heifner,  Joseph    F.    601 

Heifner,  John  Pressley 822 

Heifner,  V.  536  • 

Hellensmith,  •  William 330 

Henderson,  William  F. 661 

Hepple,   George  705 

Hestler,  August  658 

Hickerson,  E.    R.    277 

Hines,  Abraham    S.    392 

Hines,  Hollie   P.   524 

Hinton,  Newton    E.    ^^_  782 

Holbrook,  B.   C.    456 

Holbrook,  Solomon   M.    329 

Holloway,  John  H. 363 

Holman,  H.  Prank 264 

Holmau,  Jim  W.  i92 

Holman,  Neal    817 

Holman,  William    561 

Holtsinger,  F.  M.  417 

Hon,  Charles  C.  316 

Honey,  James  H.   831 

Horner,  James  S.  386 

Hubbard,  Frank  T.   560 

Hubbard,  James  B.   526 

Hulen,  C.   M.    j___  271 

Hulen,  George   L.    529 

Hulen,  Sterling   Price   532 

Hunker,  Albert   J.    693 

Hunter,  Silas  Oak 459 

Huntsman,   Josiah   683 

Hurt,  Eugene   H.   700 

Hurt,  Everett    E.    598 

Hutsell,  James   D.    359 

Hutsell,  Jerry   C.   370 

Hutsell,  John  W.   850 

Hutsell,  W.   W.   346 

Irons,  Thomas  408 

Irons,  Williiim  A.  632 

Jackson,  George  H.   565 

Jackson,  I.  B.  585 

Jackson,  John   A.   682 


BIOGRAPHICAL  INDEX. 


Jaeger,  Gustav  H.   360 

Jahnel,  Peter     670 

Jefferies,  Jerry  M. 235 

Jennings,  J.   B.   228 

Jolinson,  George  L.   443 

Johnston,  Norman  C.  569 

Johnston,  Mrs.  R.  M.  403 

Jones,  A.   W.   301 

Jones,  W.   B.   341 

Jones,  William   F.    515 

Jones,  Winfleld   S.   424 

'jordan,   William  S.   656 

Keeley,  R.  F. 847 

Kehoe,  James    L.    460 

Kehoe,  Martin  J.   457 

Keiter,   Ed   Y.   467 

Kelliher,  Daniel  T. 339 

Kellock,    Thomas    413 

Kelly,  Leonai-d    W.    539 

Kelly,  William  S.  660, 

Kiernan,  Robert  B.   550 

Kingsbury  Robert 364 

Klein,  Ivouis  803 

Kynaston,  John  F.  344 

Ijamb,  Hugh    702 

Land,  Hiram     497 

Landram,  W.  L.   393 

Larson,   Charles  L.    756 

Lawrence,   Marvin  R.   772 

Lay,   George   William   611 

T.ea,  A.  G.  435 

Lea,  Elbert   D.    591 

Leonard,  Edward  B.   383 

Levy,  Ben     796 

Levy,  Henry     796 

Lilly,  Major   J.    231 

Littrell,  James   H.    506 

Ldttrell,  Watts    ^__  521 

Lockridge,  William   D.   694 

Lotter,  Herman  J.   447 

Lowry,  John  A.    821 

Lynch,  Bernard  B.  843 

Lynch,  John  E.   253 

JlcAdam,  C.    A.    372 

McAfee,  Prank  C.    286 

McCandless,  Alexander  - 401 

JlcCormick,  Frank   Leslie   361 

McCoy,  Alexander   B.   348 

McCoy,  Hartley    A.    208 

McCune,  John   W.    815 


McDonald,  Patrick    47& 

McDonald,  Swan   T.    77& 

McGinnis,  Thomas 441 

MIeKinney,    J.     Logan 677 

McKinney,  H.    (Coon)    675 

McKinney,  H.    S.    "Harry" 472 

McKinney,  Herbert    J.    677 

McKinney,  J.   F.   391 

McKinney,  Madison 480 

McKinney,  May    B.    674 

McLean,   W.  H.  725 

Magruder,   Samuel   A.   307 

Mah;in,  Albert  K. 252 

Mahan,  E.   Bell   251 

Malone,  Homau    H.    437 

Maloue,  Lute  A.   664 

Maugus,  William   F.    324 

Manning,  Charles  A. 512 

Marshall,  ByM    ulO 

Marshall,  Claude   D.   794 

Marshall,  James   W.    479 

Marshall,  Melvin-N.    283 

.Marshall,  Milton   M.    350 

Marshall,  Wiley  D.   i>ll 

Malrtin,  Forrest    243 

Martin,  Joseph  Davis 261 

Martin,  John  R.   259 

Martin,  Omar    260 

Martin,  Samuel   355 

-Maslen,  William   F.   756 

Mason,  William   Y.    746 

Mast,  Phillip    710 

Mathews,  Huston    311 

Mathias,  Nicholas    639 

Mayo,  James   P.    608 

Mayo,  Porter    593 

Meals,  Marvin    325 

Meals,  Orville    488 

Meals,  William    J.    334 

Mechanic  Savings  Bank 227 

Melton,  John  A.   476 

Menke,  Perry  D.  385 

Merck,  August  295 

Merrill,  Rufus  E.   835 

Meyers,   F.   H.   stl 

Michaels,  S.  A.  635- 

Mikel,  Charles  W.   663 

Milam,  Ed  L. 425 

Milam,  John  C.   427 

Miles,  William    N.    753 


BIOGRAPHICAL   INDEX. 


Miller,  Clyde    272 

Miller,  Thomas    W.    428 

Miller,  William   J.    493 

Mitchell,   Ralph  507 

Mitchell,  Koss   A.    487 

Mize,  John    V.    718 

Moberly     Wholesale      Uroi-cry      Com- 
pany  282 

Moeller,  Otto    L.    828 

Moore,  William   F.   792 

Morris,  (Jeorge  W.   662 

Morris.  John  .J.   695 

Morri.ssy.   Calvin   T.   4.34 

Morrison,  Eldridse  >S.   380 

Motley,  .J.   E.   730 

Momice,  A.  .M.  230 

Mounee,  Alexander    M.,    .Tr 229 

Murphy,  Mark   484 

Murphy.  Patrick   .1.    416 

Muruiu,  John   J.   762 

Murry,  Marion    773 

Musick,   William   E.    627 

Xeal,  Matthew    H.    .522 

Nebergali,  Charles  C.   477 

Xebergall,  .John    H.    240 

Nelson,  Clement   H.    640 

Nice,  Hamp  M.   351 

Nice,  O.   R.   344 

Nichols.  George   M.    500 

Nichols,  Roy    716 

Noell,  .John    R.    671 

Noland,  Moss  R.  735 

Nugent,  Robert  A.    844 

O'Brian,  James  R.  297 

O'Bryan,  Owen  Redick 256 

O'Conner,  James  T.  798 

O'Keefe,  Arthur    703 

O'Keefe,  John   C.    z88 

O'Keefe,  Joseph  F. 290 

O'Keefe,  William   P.    289 

0'Lear.y,  John    726 

Ornburn,  Benjamin  P. 527 

Ornburn,  OUie    837 

Ostman,  George  J.  841 

Owen,  James    H.    851 

Owen,  Henry   W.    723 

Owen,  Willard    490 

Owings,  Willard  A.   538 

Packwood,  Price 764 

Palmer,  Elliott    799 


Palmer,  Shackel    728 

Payton,  Oscar    W.    422 

Peebles,  James   A.    414 

Perry,  George   O.    ^ 461 

Phillips,  DufC  G.  719 

Phipps,  Samuel  B.  578 

Pigott,  R.    F.    347 

Pitts,  John  A.   545 

Powell,  Charles  J.   518 

Powell,  Ishami    . 552 

Itagau,  Stephen  T. 291 

Ragsdale-Carter  Dairy  Company 405 

Ragsdale,  Earl    406 

liagsdale,  Edward  W. (77 

Randolph   County   Trust   Company 315 

Ratliff,  George    N.    ■ 448 

Ratliff,  Irven  629 

Rector,  Joel  L.  739 

Reed,  John    H.    «04 

Reeil,  AY.   T.   436 

Rennolds,  George  R.   481 

Rentchler,  Chester  L. 724 

l£ice,  John  D.    838 

Richardson,  Charles   H.   366 

Richeson,   Joseph   G.   791 

Richmond,  Aubert  B. 626 

Rief-'el,  Jerome  A. 410 

Riegel,   Val  409 

Robb,  .John  Price 696 

Robb,   Leslie   698 

Roberts,  James  G.   . 376 

Roberts,  John   Henry    374 

Robertson,  William    820 

Robertson,  Waller  W. 523 

Robinson,  John   F.   816 

Rohloff,  William   F. 276 

Romans,  Merritt  A. 263 

Rother,  Anthony   J.   388 

Rowland,   Marvin  832 

Rubey,  A.   B.   284 

Rucker  Brotliers 450 

Rucker,  Robert    M.    269 

Rupp,  E.   G.   294 

Rutherford,  Hayden   L.    555 

Ryan,  H.  Edwin 340 

Sandisou,  Charles   D.    572 

Sandison,  Jack  M.   249 

Sandison,  James   248 

Sandison,  W.  H.  551 

Sandison,  William    249 


BIOGRAPHICAL  INDEX. 


Sanfoi-d,  J.   E.   270 

Scampton,  William   D.    285 

Sehmldt,  I.   J.   70S 

Sears,  James  T.   606 

Sears,  Madison  L. 747 

Shearer,  Bert  319 

Shiflett,  Walter  J. 642 

Sliipp,  Charous  M. 665 

Short,  Edward  C. 317 

Short,  Patrick   J.    317 

Short,  William  J.   318 

Shumate,  Clay  A.  491 

Sibbitt,  A.    C.    397 

Sibbitt,  Glenn   A.    597 

Sipple    Brothers    439 

Skinner,  John   C.    712 

Skinner,  Gather   A.    775 

Smith,  Garfield  A.   304 

Smith,  George  A.   768 

Smith,  William  C.   587 

Snow,  O.  B.  b29 

Sours,  Pousie    L.    738 

Sours,  George  H.   465 

Sours,  John    S.    493 

Spragg,  Robert  W.  644 

Spurting,  Walter  E. 517 

Staebler,  George 71T 

Stamm,  W.   J.    1  352 

Stamper,  F.  M.   779 

Stark,  John  B. 637 

S'tautermann,  Peter     432 

Stephens,  Temple   354 

Sternitzke,  John  Albert 407 

Stevenson,  S.  0. 278 

Stinnett,    J.    P.    390 

Stockton,  Joseph  G. 541 

Street,    Frank    542 

Sutliff,   Enoch   P.   558 

Sutliff  and  Jennings 369 

Summers,  James   H.    610 

Summers,  Lewis  A.  607 

Swetnam,  J.    H.    543 

Swetnam,  Jim   W.    622 

Taylor,  John   N.    720 

Tedford,  May  J.  293 


Terrill,  Henry  E.   262 

Terrill,  E.    G.    382 

Terry,  Alfred     ^-  618 

Thackston,  John  W.   419 

Thiemann,  A.  786 

Thornburg,  George ^  544 

Towles,  William  K.,  Jr.   395 

Towles,  William    K.,    Sr 304 

Towles,  Stokley  P. 469 

Truesdell,  James    814 

Truesdell,  John  C.   ^ 400 

Tuggle,  Irvin  U   707 

Turner,  David    602 

Tui-ner,  Virgil    365 

Vandergrift,  William  P. 807 

Vasse,  Percy  L.  570 

Walker,  Nathan  E. 819 

Waller,  Alexander    H.    450 

Walton,  Thomas  H. 478 

Webb,  John   M.   ._, d91 

Weber,  Anthony  J. 616 

Weis,  Phares  IC 245 

Wegs,   Fi-ank  B.    274 

Westfall,  Allen    C.    657 

Wheeler,  Andy   H.    740 

Wheeler,  Joseph  H.   496 

White,  Allen  C. 303 

White,  Benjamin   E.    336 

Whittaker,  Thomas  B.   801 

Wiggington,  William  F.  733 

Wight,  James   F.   R.    241 

Wight,  James  William 237 

Wight,  James  Winter 236 

Wiley,  John  W. 519 

Wilhite,  Chester   S.   353 

Williams,  James  S.   727 

Willott,  August    M.    362 

Willott,  Ed  A.   787 

Winans,  Francis  E.   788 

Winn,   James  W.    '. 485 

Wirt,  J.  E.   534 

Witten,  Paul  S.  300 

Wright,  George  P.   619 

Wright,  Sam    W.    612 

Yoder  and  Yoder 268 


History  of  Randolph  County 


CHAPTER  I 


INTRODUCTORY. 


EARLY  EXPLORATIONS  AND  DISCOVERIES  —  THE  NORTHMEN  —  CHRISTOPHER 
COLUMBUS — SPANISH,  FRENCH  AND  ENGLISH  EXPLORERS— ST.  AUGUSTINE. 
THE  OLDEST  TOWN  IN  THE  UNITED  STATES?— SANTA  FB— RESULT  OF  EARLY 
EXPLORATIONS    65-69 


CHAPTER  II 


INDIANS. 


SOLITUDE  OF  THE  WILDERNESS — CHARACTERISTICS — MODE  OF  LIVING — FORM  OF 
GOVERNMENT — RELIGION — ENDURANCE  TESTS — TORTURE  OF  CAPTIVES — A 
CRUEL  ENEMY,  BUT  STEADFAST  FRIEND — WHAT  HE  TAUGHT  THE  WHITE 
MAN — ALLIANCES  WITH  EUROPEAN  NATIONS — INDIAN  WARS— _i 70-73 


CHAPTER  III 


EARLY  EXPLORATIONS  AND  SETTLEMENTS. 


FIRST    ENGLISH    COLONY  —  SETTLEMENT    OF    MANHATTAN  —  THE    MAYFLOWER  — 
PLYMOUTH    COLONY^LORD    BALTIMORE — RELIGION  —  PENN — LAWS  —  CHAM- 

PLAIN THE  JESUITS — FRENCH  AND  ENGLISH  ENMITY— FRENCH  AND  INDIAJvT 

WARS— FALL  OF    QUEBEC  —  TREATY   OF   PARIS  —  LOUISIANA   TERRITORY  — 
DANIEL   BOONE    74-84 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  IV 


LOUISIANA  PURCHASE. 


SCOPE  OF  LOUISIANA  TERRITORY— NECESSITY  OF  AN  OCEAN  PORT— JEFFERSON'S 
NEGOTIATIONS — LIVINGSTON  AND  MONROE  TO  PARIS — PURCHASED  FROM 
NAPOLEON — TERRITORY  OF  THE  UNITED  STATES  DOUBLED — ORGANIZATION 
OF  TERRITORY^ — COUNCIL  PROCEEDINGS — POPULATION— TERRITORIAL  LEG- 
ISLATURE      85-92 


CHAPTER  V 


ADMISSION  AND  ORGANIZATION  OF  STATE. 


TERRITORIAL  LEGISLATURE  CONVENED  —  "MISSOURI  QUESTION"  —  STATE  AD- 
MITTED UNDER  CONDITIONS — COUNTIES— STATE  CONSTITUTION — FIRST  GOV- 
ERNOR—GENERAL ASSEMBLY  ELECTED- GOVERNORS  OF  MISSOURI — ^UNITBI> 
STATES  SENATORS  FROM  MISSOURI — REPRESENTATIVES  PROM  RANDOLPH 
COUNTY    93-101 


CHAPTER  VI 


EARLY  CONDITIONS. 


BOONSLICK  COUNTY  WITHIN  RBSER-\^ATION  OF  SAC  AND  FOX  INDIANS— INDIAN 
CLAIMS  EXTINGUISHED— COMING  OF  SETTLERS— FIRST  SETTLEMENTS— IM- 
MIGRATION—PIONEER  FARMING — THE  "RAZORBACK"— INDIAN  MENACE- 
BLACK  HAWK  WAR— SALE  OF  PUBLIC  LANDS 102-106 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  VII 


EARLY  SETTLEMENTS  IN  THE  BOONSLICK  COUNTRY. 


DANIEL    BOONE'S    FIRST    EXPEDITION    HERE— HE    DISCOVERS    A    SALT    SPRING 

BENJAMIN  COOPER  AND  FAMILY  SETTLE  HERE — AN  ATTRACTIVE  COUNTRY 
— FIRST  PERMANENT  SETTLEMENT — A  COLONY  OF  KBNTUCKIANS  COMB — 
ROADS— FIRST  SETTLERS   IN  BOONSLICK   COUNTRY 107-109 


CHAPTER  VIII 


CHARACTERISTICS  AND  CUSTOMS  OF  PIONEERS. 


SELF-RELIANT  AND  BRAVE — FREE  FROM  PRIDE  AND  VANITY — GOOD  WILL  BE- 
TWEEN NEIGHBORS  —  MANY  WELL-TO-DO — SLAVE  OWNERS — PRODUCTS  — 
FIRST  HOMES- COOKING — GAME  IN  ABUNDANCE— THE  PIONEER  FAMILY- 
SUPPLIED   THEIR   OWN   WANTS 110-114 


CHAPTER  IX 


PIONEER  SETTLERS  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


SILVER  CREEK  TOWNSHIP  SETTLED  FIRST— WILLIAM  HOLMAN  FIRST  SETTLER— 
SETTLERS  MOSTLY  FROM  THE  SOUTH — DR.  FORT  FIRST  PHYSICIAN — EARLY 
SETTLERS— ORIGINAL  TOWNSHIPS— PIONEERS  WERE  OF  HIGH  TYPE— OTHER 
EARLY    SETTLERS   11.5-120 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  X 


ORGANIZATION  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


ORGANIZED  IN  1829— NAMED  IN  HONOR  OP  JOHN  RANDOLPH  OF  ROANOKE— FIRST 
COUNTY  COURT— COUNTY  DIVIDED  INTO  FOUR  TOWNSHIPS— OFFICERS  AP- 
POINTED-SECOND SPECIAL  TERM— COUNTY  FINANCES— FIRST  BRIDGES — 
COUNTY  RECORDS— FIRST  CIRCUIT  COURT — FIRST  GRAND  JURY — ATTOR- 
NEYS-SECOND   GRAND    JURY 121-127 


CHAPTER  XI 


EARLY  WARS. 


BEFORE  WAR  OF  1812 — INDIANS  IN  WAR  OF  1812 — FORTS  CONSTRUCTED  IN  BOONS- 
LICK  COUNTRY — INDIAN  WARFARE — SETTLERS  KILLED  BY  INDIANS — CAP- 
TAIN COOPER  ASSASSINATED  —  CAPTAIN  SARSHALL  COOPER'S  COMPANY — 
MEXICAN  W^AR— COMPANY  ORGANIZED  IN  RANDOLPH  COUNTY — CIVIL 
WAR     128-134 


CHAPTER  XII 


PHYSICAL  FEATURES  AND  NATURAL  RESOURCES. 


LOCATION— AREA — GRAND    DIVIDE — Rn'ERS,     CREEKS     AND     STREAMS — TIMBER — 
COAL — TOPOGRAPHY— SOILS    135-1S7 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  XIII 


TOWNSHIP  ORGANIZATION. 


FOUR  ORIGINAL  TOWNSHIPS — LATER  TOWNSHIPS— ORIGIN  OF  COUNTY  SYSTEM — 
BEGINNING  OF  TOWNSHIP  SYSTEM — EARLY  METHODS  OF  TAKING  UP  GOV- 
ERNMENT LAND — PRESENT  SYSTEM  OP  LAND  SURVEYS— CONGRESSIONAL 
TOWNSHIP — MARKINGS     138-145 

I 


CHAPTER  XIV 


TOWNSHIPS. 


CAIRO    TOWNSHIP— CAIRO   VILLAGE — CLIFTON    TOWNSHIP — CLIFTON    HILL — CHAR- 
'JTON  TOWNSHIP — DARKSVILLE 146-154 


CHAPTER  XV 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 


JACKSON  TOWNSHIP — JACKSONVILLE — MONITEAU  TOWNSHIP— HIGBBE— PRAIRIE 
TOWNSHIP— RENICK— SALT  RIVER  TOWNSHIP— UNION  TOWNSHIP— MILTON- 
SILVER  CREEK  TOWNSHIP^MT.  AIRY— -SUGAR  CREEK  TOWNSHIP 155-168 


CONTEKTS. 


CHAPTER  XVI 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 
MOBERLY. 


■"CHARTER  GRANTED  TO  RAILROAD— PLAN  TO  INDUCE  SETTLERS  TO  COME  HERE- 
PATRICK  LYNCH  FIRST  SETTLER — REVIVED  AFTER  CIVIL  WAR — RAILROAD 
ACTIVITY — TOWN  PLATTED — SALE  OF  LOTS — HOTEL  BUILT — OTHER  BUILD- 
INGS—EA.RLY  MERCHANTS— PANIC— FIRST  TRUSTEES— NEGOTIATIONS  WITH 
RAILROAD  COMPANY  TO  LOCATE  SHOPS  HERE  —  LAND  DONATED  —  BONDS 
A^OTED— TOWN  INCORPORATED— FIRST  ELECTION— CITY  OFFICERS— PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS  —  PAROCHIAL  SCHOOLS  —  LIBRARY  —  CONTRACT  WITH  RAILROAD 
COMPANY — BOND— FROM  MOBERLY'S  FIRST  NEWSPAPER 169-191 


CHAPTER  XVII 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 
HUNTSVILLE  AND  SALT  SPRING  TOWNSHIP. 


:SALT  SPRING  TOWNSHIP.  HUNTSVILLE:  LOCATION  OF  COUNTY  SEAT- NAMED 
AFTER  DANIEL  ITQNT,  ONE  OF  THE  DONORS — OTHER  DONORS— FIRST  SALE 
OF  LOTS — PIONEER  BUSINESSMEN — EXTRACT  FROM  MISSOURI  GAZETTE — 
FIRST  LODGES — FIRST  CHURCH  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOL— OPERA  HOUSE — TOWN 
INCORPORATED— FIRST  MAYOR— PUBLIC  SCHOOL — CITY  AND  SCHOOL  OFFI- 
CBRS— TEACHERS— MT.  PLEASANT  COLLEGE  —  OFFICERS  —  FIRST  FAIR — 
LIBRARY— FIRST  COURT  HOUSE— SECOND  COURT  HOUSE 193-203 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  XVIII 


MEDICAL  PROFESSION. 


DR.  WILLIAM  FORT,  FIRST  DOCTOR  —  EARLY  CONDITIONS— EARLY  DOCTORS  — 
PHYSICIANS  FROM  1865  TO  1890 — DOCTOR  XBRRILL — DOCTOR  VASSE — EARLY 
DOCTORS  AT  HIGBEE,  RENICK,  CLIFTON  HILL,  CAIRO  AND  OTHER  LOCALI- 
TIES— EARLY  DOCTORS  AT  MOBERLY — PRESENT  PHYSICIANS  OF  THE 
COUNTY    204-206 


CHAPTER  XIX 


BENCH  AND  BAR  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


SECOND  JUDICIAL  DISTRICT  ESTABLISHED — JUDGE  TODD  PRESIDED  OVER  FIRST 
CIRCUIT  COURT— FIRST  LAWYERS  IN  ATTENDANCE— JUDGES  THOMAS  REY- 
NOLDS, JOHN  D.  LBLAND,  WILLIAM  A.  HALL,  GEORGE  H.  BURCKHARTT,  JOHN 
A.  HOCKADAY,  ALEXANDER  H.  WALLER  AND  ALLAN  W.  WALKER— EARLY- 
LAWYERS — LATER  MEMBERS  OF  THE  BAR— PRESENT-DAY  LAWYERS-    207-212 


CHAPTER  XX 


EARLY  CHURCHES. 


FIRST  CHURCH  ORGANIZED  IN  1819 — OTHER  EARLY  ORGANIZATIONS — PRIMITIVE 
AND  MISSIONARY  BAPTISTS — MT.  PLEASANT  COLLEGE  BUILT — PROVIDENCE 
METHODIST  CHURCH — ANTIOCH  CHRISTIAN  CHURCH — SALEM  CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH— SUGAR  CREEK  CUMBERLAND  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH — MT.  HOPE 
CUMBERLAND  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH 213-214 


CONTENTS. 


CHAPTER  XXI 


TRANSPORTATION. 


STEAMBOAT  TO  HANNIBAL  AND  GLASGOW — SUPPLIES  HAULED  OVERLAND — NORTH 
MISSOURI  RAILROAD  IN  1858— RAILROAD  BUILDING  SUSPENDED  DURING 
CIVIL  WAR— CHICAGO  &  ALTON  BUILT  IN  1871 — "WABASH  RAILROAD  AND  ITS 
BRANCHES — THE  MISSOURI.  KANSAS  &  TEXAS — RAILROAD  PROSPECTS  IN 
CONTEMPLATION     215-217 


CHAPTER  XXII 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


THE    "RAZORBACK" — FROM    THE    AUTOBIOGRAPHY    OF    LIBERTY    NOBLE — INDIAN 
SCARE  OF  lS2fl 218-224 


CHAPTER  XXIII 

BIOGRAPHICAL 


INDEX  TO  ILLUSTRATIONS 


Ash,  Ottis  ().   225 

lUeClsoe,    Jolin    A.    ami   fiimily 4U4 

Bledsoe's  Residence,  John  A 405 

Bradley,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dudley  T 570 

Burke,    Edmund    568 

Burton,    Henry    584 

Busch,  Theodore  F.  312 

Carney,  P.  J.  376 

Clifford.    William   C.    384 

Coal  Mine,  Higbee 160 

Court  House,  Pluntsville 65 

Cross,  j;  T. ^ 296 

Darby,  William  F.,  and  family 528 

Dunn,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Julius 440 

Early  Day   Transportation   90 

Emerson,  William  H. 328 

Esry,    William   August   592 

Fennel,   William,   S'r.   280 

Halliburton,   George   D.   504 

Haltei'man,  Jlr.  and  Mrs.  Cyrus 520 

Hamilton,  John  X. 232 

Harris,  C.  J.  Lumber  Company o6S 

Heifner,    V.    536 

High  School,  Moberly 128 

Hines,  Abraham   S.,   and   family 392 

Holbrook,    B.    C.    456 

Holman,    H.    Frank   264 

Hubbard,  John  W. 560 

Irons,  Thomas     408 

Irons,  William    A.    632 

Jaeger,  G.  H.  360 

Jones,  Winfield  Scott 424 

Kynaston,  John  F. 344 


JIcKinney,  II,  S.  "Harry"  and  family  472 

McKinuey,  "Jlat"    480 

Mayo,  James   P.    008 

Manning,  John  W. 512 

Manning,   Mrs.   Martha  I.   512 

Meals,  Itesidence   of   (.)rville 488 

Miller,  Clyde    272 

Murphy,   P.   J.   ^lO 

Xeber.eall,  John  X.  240 

O'Bryan,  Owen  Redick 256 

O'Keefe,  John   C.  288 

Pioneer    Home    65 

Pioneer  Motor  Power 80 

Postoffiee,  Moberly  65 

Powell,   Isham  and  grandson 552 

Public   Library,   Huntsville 192 

Public  School,  Higbee 160 

Public   School,   Huntsville  192 

Katliff,  George  X. 448 

Sanitarium,   Randolph  County 80 

Sandison,  James   248 

•Smith,  G.   A.    304 

Stamm,  William,  Jr.   352 

Stamm,  Jlr.  and  Mrs,  William  J 352 

'Street  Scene,  Moberly 176 

Stautermann,   Peter 432 

Thornburg,   George 544 

Truesdell,  John  C.  400 

Waller,   Alex.    H Frontispiece 

AVeber,   A.   J.   ■ ei6 

AVheeler,  Residence  of  Joseph  H. 496 

White,  B.  R. 336 

W(X)dland   Hospital   128 


RANDOLPH   COUNTY    COURTHOUSE,    HUNTSVILLE.    MO. 


UNITED    STATES    POSTOFFICE,    MOBERLY,    MO. 


History  of  Randolph  County 


CHAPTER  I 


INTRODUCTORY. 


EARLY  EXPLORATIONS  AND  DISCOVERIES  —  THE  NORTHMEN  —  CHRISTOPHER 
COLUMBUS — SPANISH,  FRENCH  AND  ENGLISH  EXPLORERS — ST.  AUGUSTINE, 
THE  OLDEST  TOWN  IN  THE  UNITED  STATES— SANTA  FE— RESULT  OF  EARLY 
EXPLORATIONS. 


This  work  will  be  essentially  a  history  of  Randolph  County.  But 
the  history  of  no  state,  nor  part  of  a  state,  of  this  Union  would  be  com- 
plete if  all  earlier  historic  events  are  omitted. 

The  first  European  visitors  to  North  America  were  Northmen  about 
Ihe  year  1000  A.  D.,  under  the  leadership  of  Leif  Ericsson,  son  of  Eric 

the  Red,  an  adventurous  navigator  and 
explorer.  The  place  where  he  and  his 
companions  landed,  and  later  spent  one 
or  more  winters  cannot  be  determined. 
They  called  the  region  Vineland  be- 
cause of  the  abundance  of  wild  grapes. 
This  point  may  have  been  somewhere 
along  the  North  Atlantic  coast  from 
A  pioNBBR~HOMB  Labrador  to  Massachusetts   or  Rhode 

Island.  But,  however  interesting  it  may  be  to  us  to  know  that  the  North- 
men (Danes  and  Norwegians),  visited  our  shores  at  this  earlier  date,  still 
their  discovery  led  to  nothing.    No  attempt  was  made  by  the  Northmen 


66  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

to  colonize  the  country,  and  in  course  of  time  their  descendants,  less 
adventurous,  had  lost  all  remembrance  of  any  tradition  or  record  of  that 
far  off  shore.  If  any  legend  survived,  it  had  become  a  mere  fable,  im- 
potent to  inspire  action  and  obtain  results. 

Nearly  five  hundred  years  later  Christopher  Columbus,  an  Italian, 
born  at  Genoa  about  the  year  1436,  through  the  generous  encouragemeni 
of  Queen  Isabella  of  Spain,  received  from  the  Spanish  government  the 
necessary  help,  together  with  the  rank  of  admiral,  to  enable  him  to  sail 
in  search  of  the  East  Indies  by  sailing  west.  No  thought  of  a  new  world, 
a  Western  Continent,  had  entered  the  mind  of  Columbus  or  any  one  else. 

On  Friday,  August  3,  1492,  half  an  hour  before  sunrise,  he  set  sail 
from  Palos,  Spain,  with  three  small  vessels,  and  one  hundred  and  twenty 
men. 

No  one  understood  navigation  better  than  Columbus;  he  had  a  chart 
of  the  globe  made  by  himself  and  based  on  the  highest  authorities.  Next, 
he  had  the  compass  for  his  guide.  Finally,  he  carried  with  him  an  im- 
proved astrolabe,  or  instrument  for  determining  his  position  by  observa- 
tion of  the  sun.  But  these  were  not  all.  He  had  the  conviction  that 
he  was  engaged  in  a  providential  work,  and  that  he  was  certain  to  ac- 
complish it.  There  are  occasions  in  life  when  such  a  faith  is  worth  every- 
thing; this  was  one. 

Nine  weeks  after  his  embarkation,  and  not  too  soon,  because  the 
crews  of  his  ships  had  become  discouraged,  almost  mutinous,  an  event 
occurred,  which  led  to  results.  On  October  2nd,  a  flock  of  land  birds 
was  seen  flying  to  the  southwest.  At  the  instance  of  Alonzo  Pinzon, 
one  of  his  captains,  Columbus,  who  had  been  sailing  due  west,  turned 
the  prow  of  his  ship  and  followed  these  winged  guides. 

Five  days  later  on  Friday,  October  12th,  a  small  island,  one  of  the 
Bahamas  was  sighted,  and  the  flag  of  Spain  hoisted  thereon. 

Columbus  believed  the  island  to  be  a  part  of  the  East  Indies,  hence 
he  called  the  native  inhabitants,  Indians,  a  name  they  still  bear  in  this 
country.  Columbus  made  three  more  voyages  to  the  Western  continents, 
but  never  found  out  his  mistake,  but  died  in  1506,  firmly  convinced  that 
America  was  part  of  Asia,  and  that  he  had  discovered  a  short  and  direct 
all  sea  westward  route  from  Europe  to  the  East  Indies. 

On  this,  his  first  voyage,  Columbus  discovered  Cuba,  and  San 
Domingo;  on  his  second  voyage,  Porto  Rico,  Jamaica  and  the  islands  of 
the  Caribbean  Sea  in  1493 ;  on  his  third  voyage,  1498,  the  island  of  IVin- 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  67 

idad  off  the  coast  of  Venezuela,  and  the  mainland  of  South  America  at 
the  mouth  of  the  Orinoco  river.  On  his  fourth  and  last  voyage  he  ex- 
plored Central  America  and  the  Isthmus  of  Panama.  Columbus  raised 
the  Spanish  flag  and  claimed  the  country  for  Spain  wherever  he  went. 

In  the  spring  of  1497,  John  Cabot  of  Venetia,  an  Italian  then  resid- 
ing in  Bristol,  England,  encouraged  by  Henry  VII,  King  of  England, 
set  sail  westward  and  discovered  the  continent  of  North  America. 

On  a  map  drawn  by  his  son  Sebastian  is  found  the  following  inscrip- 
tion: 

In  the  year  of  our  Lord  1497,  John  Cabot  and  his  son  Sebastian, 
discovered  that  country  which  no  one  before  his  time  had  ventured 
to  approach,  on  the  24th  of  June  about  five  o'clock  in  the  morning. 

Cabot  planted  the  English  flag  on  the  coast,  and  took  formal  pos- 
session  of  the   country   for  the   English   King. 

The  next  year  Sebastian  Cabot  made  a  voyage  and  explored  the 
coast  from  Nova  Scotia  to  Cape  Hatteras,  perhaps  even  farther  south. 
He  likewise  asserted  the  title  of  Henry  VII  to  the  land. 

Upon  the  discoveries  of  the  Cabots  the  English  based  their  claim 
to  this  country. 

The  fact  that  the  western  hemisphere,  the  two  Americas,  north 
and  south,  was  no  part  of  Asia,  was  made  known  by  Magellan  in  1517- 
1519,  sailing  under  the  flag  of  Spain,  who  sailed  around  the  south  end 
of  South  America,  through  the  straits  that  bear  his  name,  thence  north 
along  the  west  coast  for  some  distance,  thence  west  across  the  Pacific 
Ocean.     One  of  his  ships  sailed  entirely  around  the  world. 

Then  the  eyes  of  Europeans  were  opened  and  the  truth  made  known. 
America  was  an  immense  continent,  to  them  a  new  world.  In  1509,  Diego 
Columbus,  son  of  Christopher  Columbus  was  appointed  governor  of  San 
Domingo,  where  a  colony  had  been  already  established,  who  speedily 
thereafter  conquered  the  Island  of  Cuba. 

In  the  spring  of  1513,  Ponce  De  Leon,  an  elderly  Spaniard,  went 
upon  an  exploring  expedition,  under  the  auspices  of  the  Spanish  govern- 
ment and  on  Easter  Sunday  discovered  the  mainland  of  North  America. 
De  Leon  landed  near  the  mouth  of  the  St.  John  river,  planted  the  cross 
and  raised  the  Spanish  flag,  and  named  the  country  Florida.  It  was 
upon  this  discovery  that  Spain  laid  claim  to  Florida  and  afterward  made 
this  claim  good.  In  1565,  a  fort  was  built  at  St.  Augustine  by  the 
Spaniards  and  a  settlement  effected.     St.  Augustine  is  the  oldest  town 


68  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

in  the  United  States.  Santa  Fe,  in  the  state  of  New  Mexico,  the  second 
oldest  town,  was  settled  about  1582  by  Spaniards. 

During  the  year  1534,  Cartier,  a  Frenchman,  discovered  and  named 
the  St.  Lawrence  river  and  ascended  the  same  to  Mount  Royal,  so  named 
by  him,  the  site  of  the  city  of  Montreal,  raised  the  French  flag  and 
claimed  this  territory  for  France. 

In  the  spring  of  1539  Hernando  De  Soto  with  a  force  of  six  hundred 
picked  men,  two  hundred  horses,  three  hundred  hogs  for  meat,  sailed 
from  Cuba,  landed  at  Tampa  Bay,  and  began  his  march  of  exploration 
and  violence  toward  the  natives.  For  two  years  this  march  went  on. 
During  that  time  De  Soto  and  his  men  traveled  upward  of  fifteen  hun- 
dred miles  through  the  now  states  of  Florida,  Georgia,  Alabama  and 
Mississippi.  Their  quest  was  for  gold  and  they  found  little.  In  the 
spring  of  1541,  they  came  to  the  Mississippi  river  at  a  point  in  the  north- 
west corner  of  the  state  of  Mississippi  and  there  they  crossed  over  into 
the  then  wilderness,  now  the  state  of  Arkansas,  and  resumed  their  march. 
How  far,  and  whence  they  journeyed,  is  of  little  consequence  now.  In 
May,  1542,  they  came  back  to  the  great  river,  at  the  mouth  of  Red  River. 
This  was  the  end  of  De  Soto's  career.  There  he  died  and  was  secretely 
buried  at  midnight  in  the  muddy  waters  of  the  Mississippi.  Only  about 
half  of  those  who  had  landed  in  Florida  were  alive,  a  miserable  remnant 
of  a  once  proud  array,  half  naked,  half  starved,  the  survivors  at  length 
reached  the  Spanish  settlements  in  Mexico.  De  Soto  and  his  followers 
were  the  first  white  men  to  stand  on  the  banks  of  the  Mississippi  river. 

As  late  as  the  year  1600,  there  seemed  small  promise  that  this  coun- 
try would  ever  be  settled  and  governed  by  the  English-speaking  race. 
Look  at  the  situation.  More  than  a  hundred  years  had  passed  since 
Columbus  landed;  yet  the  only  white  inhabitants  of  the  territory  now 
embraced  in  the  United  States  were  a  few  hundred  Spaniards  in  St.  Augus- 
tine, Florida,  and  perhaps  a  few  hundred  more  in  Santa  Fe,  New  Mexico, 
the  second  oldest  town.  Over  the  rest  of  the  country,  embracing  more 
than  three  millions  of  square  miles,  the  Indians  ruled  supreme.  France 
had  tried  to  get  a  foothold  on  the  Atlantic  coast  and  had  failed ;  England 
had  tried  and  failed,  likewise.  Spain  alone  succeeded.  In  1600,  it  cer- 
tainly looked  as  though  her  flag  was  destined  to  wave  over  the  whole 
land  from  sea  to  sea. 

Confining  ourselves  to  the  territory  now  included  in  the  United  States, 
let  uc  see  what  the  explorers  of  that,  and  also  of  a  later  age,  found 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  69 

America  to  be.  In  great  measure  it  seemed  to  them  Europe  repeated. 
It  had  practically  the  same  climate  and  the  same  soil,  it  produced,  or 
was  capable  of  producing,  the  same  trees,  the  same  fruits,  the  same  crops, 
with  the  valuable  addition  of  cotton,  sugar,  and  rice.  In  all  ways  it 
was  equally  favorable  to  human  health  and  life. 

But  this  is  not  all.  In  two  important  respects  America  is  superior 
to  Europe.  That  continent  commands  the  Atlantic  only;  this  commands 
two  oceans,  the  Atlantic  and  the  Pacific.  Ships  can  be  sent  direct  to 
Europe  and  Africa  from  our  eastern  coast,  and  direct  to  Asia  and  Australia 
from  our  western.  That  is  the  first  f.dvantage.  The  second  is  that 
though  America  lepeats  the  natural  features  of  Europe  in  its  lakes,  moun- 
tains, plains,  rivers,  and  foiests,  yet  it  repeats  them  on  a  far  grander 
scale.  Europe  has  nothing  to  compare  with  the  Sierras  and  the  Rockies, 
the  Great  Lakes,  the  Mississippi,  Niagara,  the  Canyon  of  the  Colorado, 
Yellowstone  Park,  or  the  v  ostern  prairies.  "America,"  s^ys  a  distin- 
guished English  statesman  "has  a  natural  base  for  the  greatest  continu- 
ous empire  ever  established  by  man."  Such  was  the  land  spread  out 
before  the  explorers.  It  seemed  to  offer  to  all  who  were  disappointed  with 
the  Old  World  an  opportunity  to  try  what  they  could  make  of  life  under 
new  and  broader  conditions. 


CHAPTER  II 


INDIANS. 


SOLITUDE  OP  THE  WILDERNESS— CHARACTERISTICS— MODE  OF  LIVING — FORM  OF 
GOVERNMENT — RELIGION — ENDURANCE  TESTS— TORTURE  OF  CAPTIVES — A 
CRUEL  ENEMY,  BUT  STEADFAST  FRIEND — WHAT  HE  TAUGHT  THE  WHITE 
MAN — ALLIANCES    WITH    EUROPEAN    NATIONS — INDIAN    WARS. 

One  strange  fact  about  the  country  was,  that  east  of  the  Mississippi 
the  whole  vast  area  was  well  nigh  a  solitude.  Where  today  fifty  millions 
of  white  men  live,  there  were  then  only  two  or  three  hundred  thousand 
Indians.  In  going  through  the  forests,  the  explorers  would  sometimes 
travel  for  days  without  meeting  a  human  being.  The  truth  is,  th/at  the 
Indians  cannot  be  said  to  have  occupied  the  land;  they  simply  possessed 
it.  To  them  it  was  mainly  a  hunting-ground  to  roam  over  or  a  battle- 
field to  fight  on. 

Columbus  called  the  natives  Indians,  but  they  called  themselves  eimply 
"Men,"  or  "Real  Men";  "Real  Men"  they  certainly  often  proved  them- 
selves to  be.  The  most  numerous  body  of  Indians  in  the  east  was  the 
Algonquins;  the  ablest  and  most  ferocious  was  the  Iroquois.  They  were 
a  tall,  well-made  race,  with  a  color  usually  resembling  that  of  old  copper. 
Their  hair  was  like  a  horse's  mane,  coarse,  black  and  straight.  Their 
eyes  were  small,  black  and  deep  set.  They  had  high  cheek  bones  and 
a  prominent  nose. 

The  women  let  their  hair  grow  long.  The  men  cut  theirs  off  close 
to  the  head  with  the  exception  of  a  ridge  or  lock  in  the  middle.  That 
was  left  as  a  point  of  honor.  It  was  called  the  "scalp-lock."  Its  object 
was  to  give  an  adversary — if  he  could  get  it — a  fair  grip  in  fight,  and 
also  to  enable  him  to  pull  his  enemy's  scalp  off  as  a  trophy  of  the  battle. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  71 

That  lock  was  the  Indian's  flag  of  defiance.  It  waved  above  his  head 
as  the  colors  do  over  a  fort,  as  if  to  say,  "Take  me  if  you  can !" 

The  Indians  were  savages,  but  seldom  degraded  savages.  They 
lived  by  hunting,  fishing  and  agriculture.  Their  farming,  however,  was 
of  the  rudest  kind.  For  weapons  they  had  bows  and  arrows,  hatchets 
made  of  flint  and  heavy  clubs. 

The  Indian  believed  in  a  strict  division  of  duties.  He  did  the  hunt- 
ing, the  fighting,  and  the  scalping;  his  wife  did  the  work.  She  built  the 
wigwam  or  hut  of  bark.  She  planted  and  hoed  the  corn  and  tobacco. 
She  made  deerskin  clothes  for  the  family.  When  they  moved,  she  car- 
ried the  furniture  on  her  back.  Her  housekeeping  was  simple.  She 
kindled  a  fire  on  the  ground  by  rubbing  two  dry  sticks  rapidly  together; 
then  she  roasted  the  meat  on  the  coals,  or  boiled  it  in  an  earthen  pot. 
There  was  always  plenty  of  smoke  and  dirt;  but  no  one  complained. 
House-cleaning  was  unknown. 

The  most  ingenious  work  of  the  Indians  was  seen  in  the  moccasin, 
the  snow-shoe,  and  the  birch-bark  canoe.  The  moccasin  was  a  shoe  made 
of  buckskin,  durable,  soft,  plain  and  noiseless.  It  was  the  best  covering 
for  a  hunter's  foot  that  human  skill  ever  contrived.  The  snow-shoe  was 
a  light  frame  of  wood,  covered  with  a  net  work  of  strings  of  hide,  and 
having  such  a  broad  surface  that  the  wearer  could  walk  on  top  of  the 
snow  in  pursuit  of  game  Without  it  the  Indian  might  have  starved  in  a 
severe  winter,  since  only  by  its  use  could  he  run  down  the  deer  at  that 
season. 

The  birch-bark  canoe  was  light,  strong,  and  easily  propelled.  It  made 
the  Indian  master  of  every  lake,  river  and  stream.  Wherever  there  were 
waterways  he  could  travel  quickly,  silently  and  with  little  efl'ort.  If  he 
liked  he  could  go  in  his  own  private  conveyance  from  the  source  of  the 
Ohio  to  the  Gulf  of  Mexico  or  from  the  mouth  of  the  St.  Lawrence  to  the 
Falls  of  Niagara. 

Politically  the  Indian  was  free.  Each  tribe  had  a  chief,  but  the 
chief  had  little  real  power.  All  important  matters  were  settled  by  coun- 
cils. Socially,  the  Indian  had  less  liberty  than  the  white  man.  He  was 
bound  by  customs  handed  down  from  his  forefathers.  He  could  not  marry 
outside  his  tjribe.  He  could  not  sit  in  whatever  seat  he  chose  at  a  council. 
He  could  not  even  paint  his  face  any  color  he  fancied;  for  a  young  man 
who  had  won  no  honors  in  battle  would"  no  more  have  dared  to  decorate 
himself  like  a  veteran  warrior,  than  a  private  soldier  in  the  United  States 


72  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

army  would  venture  to  appear  at  parade  in  the  uniform  of  a  major-general. 

The  Indian  usually  believed  in  a  Great  Spirit-all-powerful  wise  and 
good ;  but  he  also  believed  in  many  inferior  spirits,  some  good,  and  some 
evil. 

Often  he  worshipped  the  evil  spirits  most.  He  reasoned  in  this  way : 
The  Great  Spirit  will  not  hurt  me,  even  if  I  do  not  pray  to  him,  for  he  is 
good ;  but  if  I  neglect  the  evil  spirits,  they  may  do  me  mischief. 

Beyond  this  life  the  Indian  looked  for  another.  There  the  brave  war- 
rior who  had  taken  many  scalps  would  enter  the  happy  hunting-grounds ; 
there  demons  would  flog  the  coward  to  never-ending  task. 

It  has  sometimes  been  said  that  "the  only  good  Indian  is  a  dead 
Indian,"  but  judged  by  his  own  standard  of  right  and  wrong,  the  red  man 
was  conscientious.  He  would  not  steal  from  his  tribe,  he  would  not  lie 
to  his  friends,  he  did  not  become  a  drunkard  till  the  white  man  taught  him. 

The  Indian  rarely  expressed  his  feeling  in  words,  but  he  frequently 
painted  them  on  his  face.  You  could  tell  by  his  color  whether  he  meant 
peace  or  war,  whether  he  had  heard  good  news  or  bad.  He  sometimes 
laughed  and  shouted,  he  seldom  if  ever  wept.  From  childhood  he  was 
taught  to  despise  pain.  A  row  of  little  Indian  boys  would  sometimes  put 
live  coals  under  their  naked  arms,  and  then  press  them  close  to  their 
bodies.  The  game  was  to  see  which  one  would  first  raise  his  arms  and 
drop  the  coal.  The  one  that  held  out  longest  became  the  leader.  If  an 
Indian  lad  had  met  with  an  accident  and  was  mortally  wounded,  he  scorned 
to  complain;  he  sang  his  "death-song"  and  died  like  a  veteran  warrior. 

Generally  speaking,  the  Indians  tortured  their  captives.  They  wanted 
to  see  how  much  agony  they  could  bear  without  crying  out.  The  surest 
way  for  a  prisoner  to  save  his  life  was  to  show  that  he  was  not  afraid 
to  lose  it.  The  redman  never  failed  to  show  his  respect  for  courage.  An 
instance  is  found  in  the  case  of  General  Stark  of  New  Hanipshire.  He 
was  taken  prisoner  by  the  Indians  in  1752,  and  condemned  to  run  the 
gauntlet.  Two  long  rows  of  stalwart  young  warriors  were  formed.  Each 
man  had  a  club  or  stick  to  strike  Stark  as  he  passed.  But  Stark  was  equal 
to  the  occasion.  Just  as  he  started  on  the  terrible  race  for  life  he  snatched 
a  club  out  of  the  hands  of  the  nearest  Indian,  and  knocking  down  the 
astonished  savages  right  and  left,  he  escaped  almost  unhurt.  The  old 
men  of  the  tribe,  who  stood  near,  roared  with  laughter  to  see  the  spruce 
young  warriors  sprawling  in  the  dust.  Instead  of  torturing  Stark,  they 
treated  him  as  a  hero. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  73 

The  Indian  was  a  treacherous  and  cruel  enemy,  but  a  steadfast  friend. 
He  thought  at  first  that  the  white  man  was  a  celestial  being  who  had 
come  from  heaven  to  visit  him.  IJe  soon  found  out  his  mistake,  and  acted 
accordingly.  The  Indian  could  return  good  for  good,  but  he  knew  nothing 
of  returning  good  for  evil ;  on  the  contrary,  he  always  paid  bad  treatment 
by  bad  treatment,  and  never  forgot  to  add  some  interest.  If  he  made  a 
treaty,  he  kept  it  sacredly;  it  is  said  that  in  no  instance  can  it  be  proved 
that  he  was  first  to  break  such  an  agrtement.  Those  of  the  early  white 
settlers  who  made  friends  with  the  redman  had  no  cause  to  regret  it. 

The  Indian's  school  was  the  woods.  Whatever  the  woods  can  teach 
that  is  useful — and  they  can  teach  much — that  he  learned.  He  knew  the 
properties  of  every  plant,  and  the  habits  of  every  animal.  The  natives 
taught  the  white  man  many  of  these'  things,  but  the  most  useful  of  all  the 
lessons  the  American  barbarians  gave  the  civilized  Europeans  was  how 
to  raise  corn  in  the  forest  without  first  clearing  the  land. 

They  showed  them  how  to  kill  the  trees  by  burning  or  girding  them. 
Then,  when  the  leaves  no  longer  grew,  the  sun  would  shine  on  the  soil 
and  ripen  the  com.  There  were  times  in  the  history  of  the  early  settle- 
ments of  white  men  when  that  knowledge  saved  them  from  starvation,  for 
often  they  had  neither  time  nor  strength  to  clear  the  soil  for  planting. 

But  the  results  of  contact  between  the  two  races  did  not  end  here. 
The  alliances  formed  between  the  Indians  and  the  English  on  the  one  hand, 
or  the  Indians  and  French,'  who  were  rivals  and  enemies  of  the  English, 
on  the  other,  had  important  historical  results.  The  hostility  of  the  Iro- 
quois Nation,  five  tribes,  of  New  York  to  the  French  in  Canada,  prevented 
the  French  from  getting  possession  of  the  Hudson  river,  and  so  separating 
the  English  colonies  of  New  England  from  those  of  Virginia  and  Pennsyl- 
vania. This  was  a  decided  advantage  to  the  English  settlers,  who  thus  got 
a  firm  foothold  on  the  Atlantic  coast. 

Finally,  the  Indian  wars  prevented  the  English  from  scattering  over 
the  country.  These  contests  forced  them  to  stand  by  each  other,  and  thus 
trained  them  for  union  and  for  independence. 


CHAPTER  III 


EARLY  EXPLORATIONS  AND  SETTLEMENTS. 


FIRST-  ENGLISH  COLONY  —  SETTLEMENT  ■  OF  MANHATTAN  —  THE  MAYFLOWER  — 
PLYMOUTH  COLONY — LORD  BALTIMORE — RELIGION  —  PBNN — LAWS  —  CHAM- 
PLAIN— THE  JESUITS— FRENCH  AND  ENGLISH  ENMITY— FRENCH  AND  INDIAN 
WARS— FALL  OF  QUEBEC  —  TREATY  OF  PARIS  —  LOUISIANA  TERRITORY- 
DANIEL   BOONE. 

The  first  English  colony  that  endured  was  sent  out  by  the  London 
Company  on  New  Year's  Day,  1607.  It  consisted  of  105  persons,  all  men. 
They  sailed  up  a  river  of  Virginia  which  they  named  the  James  river 
about  the  middle  of  May  and  settled  at  Jamestown.  Fgi^tunately  there 
was  a  young  man  of  decided  ability  among  these  colonists.  This  was 
Captain  John  Smith.  His  energy  and  courage  saved  the  settlers  from 
starvation  and  in  the  end  perpetuated  the  settlement.  The  start  was 
discouraging,  but  the  colony  lived  to  lay  the  foundation  of  a  prosperous, 
powerful  and  independent  state. 

In  1609,  Captain  Henry  Hudson,  an  Englishman  then  in  the  employ 
of  Holland,  crossed  the  ocean  and  entered  what  is  now  New  York  Bay  and 
was  the  first  Englishman  who  sailed  up  the  river  that  today  bears  his 
name. 

In  1626,  the  Dutch  West  India  Company  sent  out  a  colony  and  landed 
on  Manhattan  Island.  The  governor  bought  from  the  Indians  the  entire 
island  and  established  a  settlement  thereon.  Later  the  English  King, 
Charles  II,  claimed  the  whole  country  on  the  ground  that  the  Cabots  had 
discovered  the  coast  and  planted  the  English  flag  on  it  in  1497.  Suddenly 
one  day  in  1664  a  British  fleet  appeared  off  New  Amsterdam,  as  the  set- 
tlement was  called,  and  demanded  its  surrender,  promising  at  the  same  time 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  75 

full  protection  of  life  and  liberty,  freedom  of  trade,  religious  liberty  and 
a  representative  government.  In  consequence  the  Dutch  flag  was  hauled 
down,  the  English  colors  were  run  up,  and  the  name  changed  to  New  York. 

Thus  was  the  first  colony  planted  in  the  state  of  New  York,  and  the 
city  of  New  York  founded. 

On  a  morning  late  in  November,  1620,  the  Mayflower,  bearing  the  Pil- 
grim fathers,  102  in  number,  all  told,  sighted  Cape  Cod,  and  cast  anchor 
m  what  is  now  Province  Harbor.  While  the  Mayflower  was  at  anchor 
Captain  Myles  Standish,  who  was  with  them,  but  not  of  them,  with  a 
boat  load  of  men  went  out  to  explore.  A  few  days,  later  the  Mayflower 
sailed  into  Plymouth  Rock  Harbor,  and  the  pilgrims  went  ashore  on  the 
mainland  of  the  now  state  of  Massachusetts.  They  immediately  erected 
cabins  and  went  into  winter  quarters,  but  such  was  the  hardships  they 
had  to  bear  that  by  spring  just  one-half  of  the  colony  were  in  their  graves. 
But  when  the  Mayflower  went  back,  not  one  of  the  Pilgrims  returned ;  they 
had  come  to  stay. 

The  colony  increased  but  slowly.  Even  at  the  end  of  ten  years  there 
were  only  300  people  in  Plymouth.  Massachusetts  Colony,  founded  in 
1630,  overshadowed  and  finally  absorbed  it. 

In  1628,  John  Endicott  assisted  in  planting  a  colony  at  Salem,  Massa- 
chusetts. Endicott  was  a  Puritan  and  his  purpose  was  to  establish  a  place 
of  refuge  for  the  oppressed  people  of  his  own  faith,  and  of  his  own  faith 
only.  But  great  immigration  to  New  England  began  in  1630  when  John 
Winthrop,  a  wealthy  English  Puritan  decided  to  emigrate. 

He  came  with  a  fleet  of  eleven  vessels,  bringing  a  colony  of  over 
seven  hundred  persons,  with  horses,  cattle,  and  all  things  necessary  for 
establishing  a  thriving  settlement.  John  Winthrop  was  appointed  Gov- 
ernor, and  thus  became  the  first  sole  and  resident  Governor.  From  the 
outset  all  public  matters  were  settled  in  town  meetings.  When  the  colony 
grew  too  large,  the  towns  sent  representatives.  Church  members  only 
were  allowed  to  vote. 

In  1635  provision  was  made  for  the  establishment  of  a  public  school  in 
Boston.  In  the  course  of  a  few  years  free  instruction  was  provided  for 
every  white  child  in  Massachusetts.  This  was  the  beginning  of  the  com- 
mon school  system  of  the  United  States.  In  1636,  money  was  voted  by 
the  General  Court  to  found  a  college.  Two  years  later  the  Rev.  John 
Harvard  left  his  library  and  half  of  his  estate  of  about  750  pounds  to 
the  college.  Such  was  the  origin  of  Harvard  University,  the  first  English 
college  in  America. 


76  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

During  the  years  1634-1635  the  rich  lands  of  the  valley  of  the  Connec- 
ticut attracted  settlers  from  Massachusetts,  and  several  towns  were 
founded.  In  1639  the  people  of  these  several  towns  met  at  Hartford 
and  drew  up  the  first  constitution,  or  form  of  government  "known  in 
history." 

This  compact  made  no  mention  either  of  the  King  of  England  or 
of  the  English  company  which  held  a  royal  grant  of  the  Connecticut 
lands.    It  was  in  reality  the  constitution  of  a  republic. 

One  reason  why  the  Connecticut  emigrants  had  left  Massachusetts 
was  that  they  did  not  believe  in  the  principle  of  limiting  the  right  of 
voting  to  church  members.  The  Hartford  constitution  imposed  no  such 
restriction.  Every  citizen  was  politically  equal  with  every  other,  and 
was  at  liberty  to  take  part  in  making  the  laws. 

Today  the  United  States  and  every  state  of  the  Union  has  a  written 
constitution,  and  the  right  of  suffrage  is  general  as  to  every  citizen. 

In  the  year  1634  a  company  of  Catholic  pilgrims  came  to  America 
that  they,  too,  might  build  up  a  state  where  they  could  worship  God 
without  molestation.  This  colony  consisted  of  about  300  persons  led 
by  Governor  Leonard  Calvert,  a  younger  brother  of  the  second  Lord 
Baltimore,  landed  on  the  northern  bank  of  the  Potomac  near  its  mouth 
and  founded  the  town  of  St.  Marys.  Prior  to  this  time  Charles  I  had 
granted  to  Lord  Baltimore  that  part  of  northern  Virginia,  north  of 
the  Potomac  river,  and  named  it  Maryland  in  honor  of  his  queen,  who 
was  herself  a  Catholic.  A  part  of  these  colonists  were  gentlemen  of 
wealth  and  standing  and  probably  Catholics.  The  rest  of  the  emigrants 
were  laborers  and  seem  to  have  been  chiefly  Protestants. 

Father  White,  a  priest  who  accompanied  the  expedition,  had  no 
sooner  landed  than  he  got  permission  from  an  Indian  chief  to  convert 
his  wigwam  into  a  chapel.  This  hut  was  the  first  English  Catholic 
church  in  America.  Virginia  would  not  have  permitted  that  church 
to  stand.  New  England  would  not.  It  was  only  in  the  wilderness  of 
Maryland,  in  that  mixed  population  of  Catholics  and  Protestants  that  it 
was  safe. 

From  the  beginning  all  the  colonists  took  part  in  making  the  laws, 
and  in  a  few  years  Lord  Baltimore  granted  them  the  power  of  originat- 
ing those  laws.  In  religion,  absolute  freedom  of  worship  was  given  to 
all  Christians,  but  to  Christians  only.  No  other  colony  in  this  country 
the  nenjoyed  such  liberty,  and  it  was  wholly  unknown  in  Europe. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  77 

In  1636  Roger  Williams,  an  exiled  minister,  from  Massachusetts  with 
others  established  a  colony  at  Providence,  Rhode  Island.  Other  colonists 
soon  followed  and  founded  Portsmouth  and  Newport.  From  the  beginn- 
ing entire  freedom  of  conscience  was  given  to  every  settler,  "soul  liberty" 
Williams  called  it.  Maryland  had  granted  such  liberty  to  all  Chris- 
tians, but  the  colony  of  Providence  did  not  limit  it,  not  Protestants  and 
Catholics  only,  but  Jews  and  unbelievers  were  protected.  Roger  Wil- 
liams laid  down  and  put  into  actual  practice  what  we  may  call  the 
"American  principle,"  that  is,  that  government  has  nothing  to  do  with 
the  control  of  religious  belief.  This  idea  so  new,  strange  and  startling 
at  the  time,  steadily  grew  and  spread  until  in  time  it  became  a  part 
of  the  constitution  of  the  United  States,  where  it  now  appears  in  the 
language  following: 

"Congress  shall  make  no  law  respecting  an  establishment  of  reli- 
gion, or  prohibiting  the  free  exercise  thereof." 

And  again,  "No  religious  test  shall  ever  be  required  as  a  qualifica- 
tion to  any  office  or  public  trust  under  the  United  States." 

The  first  permanent  settlement  in  New  -Hampshire  was  about  1627, 
four  years  later,-  in  1631,  Portsmouth  was  settled.  The  first  permanent 
settlement  on  the  mainland  of  Maine  was  effected  in  1625.  Saco  and 
Biddeford  were  founded  in  1630,  and  Portland  in  1632. 

In  1668  Charles  II  of  England  granted  an  immense  tract  of  land 
south  of  Virginia  to  a  company  composed  of  Lord  Clarendon  and  seven 
associates.  This  territory  was  called  CaroHna.  On  the  coast  it  embraced 
the  entire  region  now  included  in  the  states  of  North  and  South  Carolina, 
Georgia,  and  a  part  of  Florida;  westward  it  extended  to  the  Pacific. 

At  the  time  this  grant  was  made  there  were  a  few  farmers  in  the 
northern  part  who  had  moved  in  from  Virginia.  These  settlers  were 
formed  into  a  colony  in  1663  called  Albemarle.  North  and  South  Caro- 
lina was  settled  by  emigrants  from  Virginia,  by  English  and  also  by 
Huguenots,  or  French  Protestants  who  came  to  escape  persecution  to 
which  they  were  subject  in  their  native  land.  General  Marion,  a  descen- 
dent  from  a  Huguenot  family,  a  revolutionary  patriot,  won  renown  in 
the  American   cause. 

Charleston,  founded  in  1690,  at  the  time  of  the  revolution,  was  one 
of  the  chief  cities  of  America. 

In  1861  Charles  II  gave  to  William  Penn  a  territory  of  forty-eight 
ihousand  square  miles,  fronting  on  the  Delaware  river. 


78  HISTOKY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  first  emigrants  sent  over  by  Penn  arrived  in  1681.  The  next 
year  (1682)  Penn  himself  came  over,  together  with  a  hundred  English 
Quakers,  and  took  formal  possession  of  his  vast  estate.  The  same  year 
he  founded  Philadelphia. 

Less  than  two  months  thereafter  Penn  called  an  assembly,  and  he 
with  the  people  enacted  the  "Great  Law." 

"That  constitution  had  a  two-fold  foundation,  liberty  of  the  people 
to  make  their  own  laws,  and  obedience  to  the  laws  they  had  made;" 
for,  said  Penn,  "Liberty  without  obedience  is  confusion,  and  obedience 
without  liberty  is  slavery." 

By  the  great  law  it  was  provided,  first:  That  all  Colonists  should 
be  protected  in  their  worship  of  God,  but  that  no  one  should  be  com- 
pelled to  support  or  attend  any  form  of  worship  against  his  will. 

Second:  That  all  resident  taxpayers  should  have  the  right  to  vote 
and  that  every  member  of  any  Christian  church  might  hold  office,  and 
become  a  member  of  the  legislative  assembly. 

Third:  That  every  child  after  reaching  the  age  of  twelve  should 
be  brought  up  to  some  trade  or  useful  occupation. 

Fourth:  That  the  death  penalty  should  be  inflicted  for  two  crimes 
only,  murder  and  treason,  and  for  the  first  time  in  the  history  of  the 
world,  it  was  further  provided,  that  every  prison  should  be  made  a 
workshop  and  a  place  of  reformation.  Penn's  next  act  was  a  treaty 
with  the  Indians. 

Penn  met  the  Indians  under  the  branches  of  a  wide  spreading  elm 
in  the  outskirts  of  Philadelphia.  There  solemn  promises  of  mutual 
friendship  were  made,  but  no  oaths  were  taken.  Each  trusted  the  other's 
word.  That  treaty  was  never  broken,  and  for  sixty  years,  as  long  as 
the  Quakers  held  control,  the  people  of  Pennsylvania  lived  in  peace  with 
the  Indians.  Voltaire,  the  French  historian,  said  that  it  was  "the  only 
treaty  which  was  never  sworn  to  and  never  broken." 

In  1732  General  James  Oglethorp,  a  member  of  the  English  Parlia- 
ment, obtained  a  charter  for  settling  the  country  between  the  Savannah 
and  Altamaha  rivers.  Oglethorp  was  a  man  of  high  character  and  ability. 
His  prime  object  in  establishing  t^is  colony  was  benevolent. 

Imprisonment  for  debt  obtained  in  England  and  thousands  of  honest 
hard  working  men,  who  through  sickness  or  misfortune  had  contracted 
some  debt,  however  trifling,  that  he  was  unable  to  pay,  had  been  cast 
into  prison,  where  many  of  them  remained  for  years.     These  men  were 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  79 

in  prison,  yet  they  had  committed  no  crime.  Oklethorp's  scheme  was  to 
select  the  most  deserving,  discharge  their  debts,  to  furnish  them  and 
their  famihes  transportation  to  America  and  thus  give  them  a  chance 
to  begin  life  anew. 

The  English  government  and  private  individuals  contributed  money 
and  the  first  emigrants  were  sent  out.  This  first  settlement  was  made 
on  the  Savannah  river  and  the  town  named  Savannah.  Later,  German 
Protestants,  persecuted  in  their  own  country,  and  sturdy  Scots  for  the 
Highlands  made  settlements  in  Georgia.  With  the  settlement  in  Geor- 
gia effected,  the  entire  Atlantic  coast  from  New  Brunsv/ick  to  Florida 
was  held  by  the  EngHsh  colonist. 

In  the  summer  of  1608,  Champlain,  a  French  explorer,  sailed  up 
the  St.  Lawrence  to  Quebec  and  there  established  the  first  French  colony 
planted  in  North  America.  Other  settlements  followed.  In  New  Bruns- 
wick at  Louisberg  on  the  island  of  Cape  Breton,  at  Montreal,  Kingston 
and  other  places. 

The  French,  not  the  English,  were  the  explorers  of  the  West.  The 
Jesuit  Missionaries  set  out  to  convert  the  Indians,  and  in  their  zeal  for 
this  work,  they  braved  all  danger,  and  every  hardship.  They  made 
friends  of  the  Indians  and  sought  to  do  them  good.  The  fur  traders, 
seeking  gain,  followed  on  the  heels  of  the  missionaries,  oftimes  they 
came  with  him.  Next  came  the  fort  builders,  and  after  the  friendship  of 
the  Indians  had  been  secured  all  came  together. 

The  Jesuits  reached  the  western  shore  of  Lake  Michigan  in  1669 
at  Green  Bay.  There  they  established  a  mission.  Prior  thereto  mis- 
sions had  been  established  at  Sault  St.  Marie  and  Mackinaw.  In  1673, 
Joliet,  a  French  explorer  and  fur  trader,  and  Father  Marquette  set  out 
from  Mackinaw  to  find  a  great  river  which  the  Indians  told  them  was 
west  of  Lake  Michigan.  Making  their  way  to  Green  Bay,  in  birch  bark 
canoes  they  paddled  up  Fox  river  to  Portage.  They  carried  their  canoes 
across,  less  than  two  miles,  and  started  down  the  Wisconsin  river,  and 
on  a  June  day  they  floated  out  of  the  mouth  of  the  Wisconsin  onto  the 
waters  of  the  Mississippi.  Down  this  stream  they  descended  past  the 
mouths  of  the  Missouri  and  the  Ohio  rivers  and  south  to  the  Arkansas. 
Here  they  turned  back  and  laboriously  paddled  their  way  back  to,  and 
up  the  Illinois  river,  and  thence  across  Lake  Michigan. 

Six  years  later,  in  1679,  La  Salle,  the  greatest  of  these  French  ex- 
plorers, set  out  from  Montreal  to  complete  the  work  of  Joliet  and  Mar- 


80  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

quette.  He  sailed  to  Mackinaw,  and  from  thence  he  and  his  companions 
went  in  canoes  to  the  St.  Joseph  river,  near  the  southeastern  corner 
of  Lake  Michigan.  From  thence  they  crossed  over  to  the  headwaters 
of  the  Kankakee  river,  and  down  this  stream  to  the  Illinois  river.  Con- 
tinuing their  descent  to  a  point  where  Peoria  now  stands.  They  built 
a  fort.  Leaving  a  small  garrison,  La  Salle,  although  it  was  winter, 
returned  to  Canada  on  foot  for  supplies.  While  he  was  gone.  Father 
Hennepin,  a  priest  in  his  expedition,  set  out  from  this  fort  to  explore. 
After  many  adventures  he  finally  reached  the  rapids  of  the  Mississippi, 
where  Minneapolis  now  stands,  which  he  named  the  Falls  of  St.  Anthony. 

The  next  year  La  Salle  returned  to  Illinois,  landing  where  Chicago 
now  stands,  he  crossed  over  to  the  Illinois  and  going  down  the  river, 
entered  the  Mississippi  in  February,  1782.  The  weather  was  bitter  cold 
and  the  river  full  of  floating  ice;  La  Salle  did  not  hesitate,  but  started 
with  his  company  on  his  voyage.  Nine  weeks  later  he  reached  the 
Gulf  of  Mexico.  There  he  set  up  a  wooden  cross  on  which  he  fastened 
a  metal  plate  bearing  the  arms  of  France,  and  took  possession  of  the 
entire  territory  watered  by  the  Mississippi  and  its  tributaries  as  French 
territory.  He  gave  the  name  of  Louisiana  to  this  vast  territory,  which 
included  all  the  valley  of  the  Mississippi  and  extended  from  the  Alle- 
ghenys  in  the  East  to  the  Rockies  in  the  West.  In  1718  a  French 
colony  was  established  at  Mobile,  on  the  Gulf  of  Mexico,  and  in  1718 
New  Orleans  was  founded  by  the  French. 

We  have  seen  that  by  reason  of  the  exploration  of  the  Cabots  that 
England  claimed  all  of  the  Atlantic  coast  from  Nova  Scotia  to  Floriaa 
and  the  territory  westward  to  the  Pacific  ocean  Several  of  the  early 
grants  made  by  the  English  sovereigns  granted  all  this  terrtiory  westward 
to  the  Pacific. 

We  have  also  seen  that  French  explorers.  La  Salle  and  others,  laid 
claim  not  only  to  Canada,  but  to  the  Valley  of  the  Mississippi  as  well, 
and  France  stood  ready  to  make  good  these  claims  by  force  of  arms. 

In  Europe  the  French  and  English  had  been  long  at  enmity,  and 
their  rival  claims  to  territory  in  America  did  not  make  them  better 
friends,  and  eventually  led  to  conflicts,  four  in  number,  known  in  the 
histories  of  the  colonists  as  the  "French  and  Indian  Wars." 

The  Iroquois  Nation  of  Indians  in  northern  New  York  were,  through- 
out, the  steadfast  allies  of  the  English  during  all  of  their  wars. 


RANDOLPH   COUNTY    SANITARIUM 


PIONEER    MOTOR    POWER 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  81 

The  Algonquins,  comprised  of  kindred  tribes  in  southern  Canada, 
Michigan  and  extending  west  as  far  as  eastern  Minnesota,  together  with 
other  tribes  west  of  the  Alleghanies,  were  fast  friends  and  allies  of  the 
French.     The  first  war  began  in  1689  and  lasted  eight  years. 

Frontenac,  the  French  governor,  sent  a  force  of  French  and  Indians 
to  attack  the  English  colonies  along  the  Hudson.  They  secretly  marched 
from  Montreal  in  mid-winter,  and  at  midnight  fell  upon  the  village  of 
Schenectady,  New  York,  burned  it  and  massacred  most  of  the  inhabitants. 

Thus  was  the  war  begun,  and  thus  was  it,  and  the  next  two  wars, 
in  the  main,  prosecuted.  The  second  war  began  in  1702  and  lasted 
until  1713. 

After  an  interval  of  thirty  years,  the  third  one  of  these  wars  began 
in  1744,  and  ended  in  1748.  Like  the  preceding  wars  it  led  to  a  series 
of  forays,  destruction  of  outlying  towns,  pillage  and  massacre,  and  one, 
or  more,  pretentious  military  attempts  by  the  English  colonists,  that 
in  the  end  obtained  no  lasting  results. 

By  this  time  the  French  had  got  possession  of  the  two  chief  rivers 
of  the  country,  the  St.  Lawrence  and  the  Mississippi.  To  clinch  their 
hold,  they  had  built  fort  after  fort  until  they  had  a  line  of  sixty,  extend- 
ing from  Quebec  to  Lake  Michigan,  and  thence  down  the  Illinois  and 
Mississippi  rivers  to  the  gulf.  The  French  and  the  English  both  claimed 
the-valley  of  the  Ohio  river. 

Before  1749,  no  English  settlements  had  been  made  west  of  the 
Alleghanies.  In  the  year  1749  the  kind  of  England  granted  to  the  Ohio 
Company,  600,000  acres  of  land  in  the  Ohio  Valley,  situated  in  south- 
west Pennsylvania  and  West  Virginia. 

The  French  determined  to  stop  this  movement  and  began  to  erect 
a  new  line  of  forts  extending  from  Erie  on  Lake  Erie  southward  to  the 
juncture  of  the  Alleghany  and  Monongahela  rivers,  where  the  Ohio  river 
is  formed. 

These  movements  speedily  brought  about  results,  namely  the  fourth 
and  last  French  and  Indian  war.  The  struggle  began  in  1754  and  was 
finally  terminated,  in  fact,  by  a  bloody  battle  fought  under  the  walls 
of  Quebec  in  the  autumn  of  1758,  Montcalm,  noble  and  chivalorous  com- 
manded the  French.  General  Wolf,  gifted  and  gallant,  led  the  English. 
The  English  won  and  Quebec  surrendered.  Both  Montcalm,  aged  40, 
and  Wolf,  age  34,  fell  in  this  battle;  thus  two  loyal  and  intrepid  spirits, 
foes  in  life,  together  passed  into  the  land  of  perpetual  peace. 


82  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  fall  of  Quebec  was  a  turning  point  in  the  history  of  North 
America.  On  the  night  that  Wolf  and  his  army  climbed  the  rocky 
heights  behind  Quebec,  to  the  plains  of  Abraham,  the  whole  of  the 
country  west  to  the  Mississippi,  and  the  valley  of  that  river  to  New 
Orleans  and  the  gulf  belonged  to  France.  When  the  sun  went  down  the 
next  day,  the  sun  of  France  had  already  set  in  the  new  world.  Her  hold 
on  America  was  lost,  gone  forever.  But  this  seven  year  war  did  not 
come  to  an  end  until  Spain  had  taken  up  arms  in  aid  of  France.  Then, 
in  1762,  England  conquered  Cuba  and  the  Philippine  Islands.  When  peace 
was  made  at  Paris,  in  1763,  England  gave  all  these  islands  back  to  Spain 
and  took  Florida  in  exchange.  France  to  indemnify  Spain  for  the  loss 
of  Florida,  ceded  to  Spain  the  city  of  New  Orleans  and  the  territory  of 
Louisiana. 

By  the  treaty  of  Paris,  1763,  all  of  the  territory,  including  Florida, 
New  Orleans  and  westward  to  the  Mississippi,  all  of  Canada  west  to  the 
Pacific  and  north  to  the  frozen  ocean,  except  Alaska  became  English 
territory.    The  territory  of  Louisiana  was  ceded  to  Spain  in  1762. 

Less  than  seventeen  years  after  the  capture  of  Quebec,  the  Ameri- 
can revolution  began  and  seven  years  later  the  thirteen  colonies  had 
gained  their  independence.  Shortly  thereafter  the  constitution  was 
framed  and  adopted,  the  thirteen  colonies  became  states  of  the  Union, 
and  the  United  States  of  America  appeared  upon  the  map,  and  took 
their  place  among  the  nations  of  the  earth. 

In  1800,  Louisiana  territory  was  retroceded  to  France,  but  Spain 
was  in  actual  possession  until  November,  1803. 

The  first  permanent  settlements  made  by  the  French  were  situated 
along  the  eastern  bank  of  Mississippi,  five  in  number,  in  the  state  of 
Illinois,  extending  from  near  the  mouth  of  the  Illinois  to  the  Kaskaskia 
river.  They  were  Kaskaskia,  settled  in  1682,  View  Rocher,  Fort  Charters, 
Phillippi  and  Kahoki.  The  white  population  of  these  five  posts  did  not 
exceed  eight  hundred. 

From  these  points  exploring  parties  were  sent  forth,  and  one  such 
party  from  Kaskakia  having  crossed  the  Mississippi  in  search  of  the  pre- 
cious metals,  found  lead  instead.  This  discovery  led  to  t?ie  establish- 
ment of  the  first  white  settlement  on  the  west  bank  of  said  river, 
in  1684,  at  St.  Geniveve,  in  the  state  of  Missouri. 

St.  Louis  was  founded  by  Pierre  Laclede  Siguest,  in  the  year  of  1764 ; 
he  was  a  native  of  France,  and  a  member  of  a  trading  company  to  which 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  83 

a  royal  charter  had  granted  an  exclusive  trade  with  Indians  as  far  north 
as  the  St.  Peters  river.  This  colony  grew  rapidly  by  accessions  from 
Kaskakia  and  other  towns  on  the  east  side  of  the  river  and  its  trade 
correspondingly  increased.  The  next  settlement  was  made  at  Potosi,  in 
Washington  county,  by  Francis  Breton,  who  discovered  the  mine  nearby. 

Five  years  after  St.  Louis  was  founded,  Blanchette,  a  Frenchman, 
established  a  settlement  and  built  a  fort  at  St.  Charles,  the  first  in  north 
Missouri.  Soon  thereafter  the  old  French  village  of  Portage  dis  Sioux 
was  located  on  the  Mississippi,  near  the  south  of  the  Illinois  river. 

In  1781,  New  Madrid  was  settled  by  French  Canadians,  and  there- 
after, in  1801  Cote  San  Dessein,  on  the  Missouri  river  in  Callaway  county 
was  settled  by  the  French.  This  village  at  that  time  was  considered  the 
outpost. 

Prior  to  the  acquisition  of  Louisiana  territory,  a  number  of  adven- 
turous spirits  from  the  older  states  of  the  Union,  attracted  by  the  liberal 
proffers  of  land  grants  made  by  the  Spanish  authorities,  or  by  the  call 
of  the  wild,  or  by  both,  had  come  to  Missouri.  Among  these  was  Moses 
Austin  of  Virginia  who  in  1795  received  a  grant  of  a  league  of  land  from 
the  Spanish  government,  on  condition  that  he  would  establish  a  lead 
mine  at  Potosi  and  work  it.  At  this  place  the  first  shot^tower  and  sheet- 
lead  manufactory  was  erected. 

Big  River  Mills,  St.  Francois  County,  was  settled  in  1796,  by  Andrew 
Baker,  John  Alley,  Ftancis  Stamator  and  John  Andrews,  each  locating 
claims.  The  next  year  a  settlement  was  effected  near  Farmington  by 
Rev.  Williams  Murphy  from  East  Tennessee. 

In  1796  settlements  were  made  in  Perry  County  by  emigrants  from 
Kentucky  and  Pennsylvania.  Birds  Point,  opposite  Cairo  in  Mississippi 
County,  was  settled  in  1800  by  John  Johnson,  who  received  a  land  grant 
from  the  Spanish  authorities.  Norfolk  and  Charleston  were  settled  in 
1800  and  1801.    Warren  County  was  settled  in  1801. 

Daniel  Boone,  a  pioneer  in  Kentucky,  secured  a  grant  of  land  in 
St.  Charles  County  and  located  thereon  about  1797.  He  was  then  an 
old  man,  but  strong  and  vigorous,  and  so  remained  for  many  years  there- 
after, and  hunted  and  trapped  up  and  down  the  Mississippi  river,  depend- 
ing upon  his  traps  and  rifle  solely  for  his  wants.  When  Hunt,  in  his 
expedition  across  the  continent,  early  in  the  year  of  1811,  touched  with 
his  boats  at  Charlotte,  one  of  the  old  villages  founded  by  the  French, 
he  met  with  Daniel  Boone,  who  was  still  leading  a  hunter's  life  at  the 


84  HISTORY   OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

age  of  82  years.  He  had  but  recently  returned  from  a  hunting  and 
trapping  expedition  and  had  brought  with  him  about  sixty  beaver  skins, 
trophies  of  his  skill.  He  was  still  erect  and  strong  of  limb  and  his  cour- 
age unabated.  Prior  to  1807,  Nathan  and  Daniel  M.  Boone,  sons  of  Daniel 
Boone,  had  joined  their  father  and  they  were  living  together,  about 
25  miles  west  of  St.  Charles.  Daniel  Boone  died  in  1820  in  his  ninety- 
second  year. 


CHAPTER  IV 


LOUISIANA  PURCHASE. 


SCOPE  OP  LOUISIANA  TERRITORY — NECESSITY  OP  AN  OCEAN  PORT— JEFFERSON'S 
NEGOTIATIONS— LIVINGSTON  AND  MONROE  TO  PARIS — PURCHASED  PROM 
NAPOLEON — TERRITORY  OP  THE  UNITED  STATES  DOUBLED — ORGANIZATION 
OP  TERRITORY— COUNCIL  PROCEEDINGS— POPULATION— TERRITORIAL  LEG- 
ISLATURE. 

Prior  to  1803  the  territory,  entire,  of  the  United  States  included 
Maine  and  extended  thence  south  to  Florida  and  thence  westward  to 
the  Mississippi,  thence  up  the  Mississippi  to  its  source,  thence  north 
to  Canada.  Immediately  after  the  revolution  immigration  westward  be- 
gan and  settlements  were  effected  along  the  Mississippi  and  to  a  greater 
extent  along  the  Ohio  and  its  tributaries.  There  were  no  railroads  then, 
nor  steamboats.  The  way  to  the  ocean,  and  the  only  way  that  surplus 
products  could  find  a  market,  was  by  way  of  New  Orleans  and  the  mouth 
of  the  Mississippi;  hence  the  fact  that  New  Orleans  and  the  way  to 
the  sea  were  controlled  by  a  foreign  country,  caused  discontent  and  loud 
clamor  from  Pittsburg,  down  the  Ohio  and  Mississippi,  to  the  last  set- 
tlement on  its  eastern  bank.  So  insistent  and  importunate  were  these 
settlers,  citizens  all,  so  unnecessary  did  it  seem,  that  the  present  and 
future  interest  of  these  settlers  be  conserved,  and  so  imperative,  if  the 
peace  of  the  nation  be  maintained,  that  in  the  early  part  of  the  year  1803 
President  Jefferson,  assisted  by  Madison,  framed  careful  instructions, 
and  appointed  James  Monroe,  envoy  extraordinary,  to  treat  with  France 
for  the  purchase  of  New  Orleans.  Shortly  before,  Robert  R.  Livingston 
had  been  appointed  minister  to  France  and  was  sent  January  11,  1803. 
Jefferson  fully  realized  the  importance  of  the  acquisition  of  the  mouth  of 


86  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

the  Mississippi,  and  his  master  mind  conceived  the  plan  to  acquire,  for 
the  west,  this  outlet  to  the  sea  by  purchase. 

In  a  letter  to  Monroe  he  wrote,  "If  we  cannot  by  a  purchase  of  the 
country,  insure  to  ourselves  a  course  of  perpetual  friendship  with  all 
nations,  then  as  war  cannot  be  far  distant,  it  behooves  us  immediately 
to  prepare  for  that  course  without,  however,  hastening  it." 

When  Monroe  later  arrived  with  more  extensive  powers,  Livingston 
had  already  begun  negotiations  and  was  waiting  to  conclude  terms  for 
the  purchase  of  not  only  New  Orleans,  but  both  ujpper  and  lower  Louis- 
iana, at  a  price  within  the  reach  of  the  United  States  treasury. 

Napoleon  was  at  the  time  on  the  verge  of  a  war  with  England  and 
he  needed  money,  besides  by  reason  of  the  supremacy  of  the  English 
upon  the  sea  and  war  inevitable,  he  deemed  the  colony  of  Louisiana  lost 
already.  The  time  was  auspicious  and  the  terms  were  speedily  agreed 
upon  and  as  speedily  concluded.  Napoleon  urged  that  the  business  be 
closed  at  once  lest,  he  said,  "I  shall  only  transmit  an  empty  title  to  those 
republicans  whose  friendship  I  seek." 

At  Paris,  France,  the  treaty  and  the  two  covenants  were  signed  in 
French  on  April  30,  1803. 

Four  days  later,  after  these  documents  had  been  translated  into 
English,  they  were  again  signed.  This  was  the  final  act  and  the  pur- 
chase was  completed.  After  thus  completing  their  task  an  exalted  senti- 
ment seemed  to  animate  and  inspire  the  three  ministers  who  had  nego- 
tiated this  compact.  As  soon  as  they  had  signed  they  rose  to  their 
feet  and  shook  hands.  Livingston,  in  expressing  the  general  satisfac- 
tion said:  "'We  have  lived  long,  but  this  is  the  noblest  act  of  our  whole 
lives.  The  treaty  which  we  have  just  signed  has  not  been  obtained  by 
art,  or  dictated  by  force;  equally  advantageous  to  the  two  contracting 
parties,  it  will  change  vast  solitudes  into  flourishing  districts.  From  this 
day  the  United  States  take  their  place  among  the  powers  of  the  first 
rank.  The  instruments  which  we  have  just  signed  will  cause  no  tears 
to  be  shed.  They  prepare  ages  of  happiness  for  innumerable  generations 
of  human  creatures.  The  Mississippi  and  Missouri  will  see  them  succeed 
one  another  and  multiply,  truly  worthy  of  the  regard  and  care  of  Provi- 
dence, in  the  bosom  of  equality,  under  just  laws,  freed  from  the  error 
of  superstition  and  the  scourage  of  bad  government." 

When  Napoleon  heard  that  the  treaty  had  been  made  final  he  said: 
■"This  accession  of  this  outlet  strengthens  forever  the  power  of  the  United 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  87 

States;  and  I  have  just  given  to  England  a  maritime  rival  that  will 
sooner  or  later  humble  her  pride." 

This  stupendous  land  transaction  was  concluded  within  two  months 
after  Monroe  had  sailed  from  New  York.  This  treaty  so  manifestly  ad- 
vantageous, was  not  so  speedily  ratified.  Grave  doubts  arose  as  to 
whether  new  territory,  and  up  to  that  time  foreign  territory,  could  be 
legally  annexed. 

The  constitution,  it  was  contended,  was  formed  for  the  government 
of  a  certain  known  and  defined  territory  and  could  not  be  extended  to 
other  territory  without  the  consent  of  each  of  the  states.  President 
Jefferson  himself  was  of  the  opinion  that  the  acquisition  of  anj''  addi- 
tional territory  whatever,  under  the  obligation  to  admit  such  territory 
as  a  state  to  the  Union,  was  not  warranted  by  the  constitution.  He  con- 
fessed that  in  lending  his  approval  he  had  "stretched  his  power  till  it 
cracked."  These  old  time  statesmen  had  the  utmost  respect  for  the 
constitution,  and  no  doubt  construed  it  strictly,  and  sought  to  shun  the 
least  infraction  of  this  sacred  covenant. 

But  the  people  were  for  it,  and  in  the  end,  the  treaty  was  ratified 
by  the  senate  on  October  21,  1803,  by  a  vote  of  yeas  24,  and  nays  7. 

The  formal  transfer  of  the  possession  of  Lower  Louisiana  was  made 
by  the  representatives  of  the  French  government,  and  accepted  by  those 
of  the  United  States  on  December  20,  1803,  at  New  Orleans,  and  the 
French  flag  was  hauled  down  and  the  flag  of  the  United  States  hoisted 
instead. 

Twenty-five  days  later,  on  January  12,  1804,  the  formal  possession 
of  North  Louisiana  was  likewise  transferred  to  this  country  in  the  city 
of  St.  Louis,  and  the  stars  and  stripes  hoisted  in  place  of  the  colors  of 
France. 

The  acquisition  of  this  vast  territory  thus  obtained  doubled  the  area 
of  the  United  States  and  more  than  doubled  its  natural  resources.  The 
Mississippi  had  now  become  ours  and  its  every  tributary,  and  the  right 
of  way  down  its  broad  bosom  to  the  open  sea  was  likewise  ours,  beyond 
dispute. 

The  magnitude  of  the  two  Louisianas  can  be  realized  only  by  tracing 
their  boundaries.  On  the  south  it  included  the  gulf  short  of  Louisiana, 
west  to  Texas.  Thence  northwest  with  the  undefined  eastern  boundary 
of  Texas  to  the  Red  river ;  thence  up  the  Red  river  to  the  100th  meridian, 
at  the  southwest  comer  of  the  present  state  of  Oklahoma;  thence  along 


88  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

said  meridian,  north  to  the  Arkansas  river;  thence  up  this  river  to  its 
source,  and  on  to  the  main  crest  or  divide  of  the  Rocky  Mountains; 
thence  northwesterly,  along  said  divide  to  the  Canadian  line,  at  about  the 
113th  meridian,  west;  thence  east,  along  said  Canadian  boundary  about 
900  miles  to  a  point  on  the  south  shore  of  the  Lake  of  the  Woods,  directly 
north  of  the  source  of  the  Mississippi ;  thence  south  to  said  source,  thence 
down  said  river  to  the  state  of  Louisiana,  the  place  of  beginning. 

Included  within  these  limits  there  are  over  nine  hundred  thousand 
square  miles  of  land,  or  six  million  acres;  all  of  which  was  obtained  by 
this  purchase  for  sixteen  million  dollars,  or  two  and  two-thirds  dollars 
per  acre — a  good  buy  certainly,  when  we  take  into  consideration  the 
fact  that  Randolph  County  was  included  in  this  purchase. 

Ten  days  after  the  ratification  of  the  treaty,  October  21,  1803,  tem- 
porary measures  were  taken  for  the  government  of  the  Louisianans,  and 
Amos  Stoddard  was  appointed  Commandant  of  Upper  Louisiana.  This 
temporary  provision  came  to  an  end  by  act  of  congress  which  went  into 
effect  October  1,  1804, 

This  act  provided  that- Louisiana  be  divided  into  two  territories,  all 
south  of  the  thirty-third  parallel  being  designated  as  the  Territory  of 
Orleans,  and  all  north  of  that  line  as  the  District  of  Louisiana.  The  Terri- 
tory of  Orleans  was  given  its  own  territorial  government,  but  the  Dis- 
trict of  Louisiana,  for  governmental  purposes,  was  placed  under  the  gov- 
ernment of  the  territory  of  Indiana  which  then  embraced  all  the  then 
Northwest  Territory.  The  Territory  of  Louisiana  was  of  the  lower  grade, 
and  all  of  the  officers  were  appointed ;  the  people  had  no  voice  therein. 

This  governmental  arrangement,  however,  created  universal  dissatis- 
faction in  the  district  of  Upper  Louisiana,  so  much  so  that  five  days 
before  it  was  to  go  into  effect,  the  representatives  of  the  five  administra- 
tive divisions  of  the  district,  all  in  Missouri  (St.  Charles,  St.  Louis,  St. 
Geneveve,  Cape  Girardeau  and  New  Madred)  joined  in  a  petition  protest- 
ing against  the*  act,  and  so  cogent  and  convincing  was  this  petition  and 
protest  that  on  March  3,  1805,  congress  by  an  act  of  that  date,  provided 
for  a  separate  territorial  organization  for  Upper  Louisiana,  thereby  creat- 
ing the  Territory  of  Louisiana,  instead  of  the  District  of  Louisiana.  No 
material  change  was  made  in  this  arrangement  until  1812.  By  this  time 
the  population  had  doubled ;  10,000  in  1804  had  grown  to  20,800  in  181'2, 
in  consequence  of  an  influx  of  settlers  from  the  states  east  of  the  Missis- 
sippi.   These  hardy  pioneers  bought  with  them  not  only  their  dogs,  their 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  89 

rifles  and  their  families,  but  very  positive  convictions  as  to  the  right 
of  local  self-government,  at  the  earliest  date  possible.  In  consequence 
they  submitted  to  congress,  between  1810  and  1812,  fifteen  petitions 
praying  for  a  higher  and  better  form  of  territorial  government. 

Congress,  on  July  4,  1812,  changed  the  name  of  Louisiana  Territory 
to  Missouri  Territory  and  organized  the  same  with  a  governor  and  gen- 
eral assembly.  The  governor,  legislative  council  and  the  house  of  rep- 
resentatives exercised  the  legislative  power  of  the  territory,  the  governor's 
vetoing  power  being  absolute. 

The  legislative  council  was  composed  of  nine  members,  whose  tenure 
of  office  lasted  five  years.  Eighteen  citizens  were  nominated  by  the  house 
of  representatives  to  the  President  of  the  United  States,  from  whom  he 
selected,  with  approval  of  the  senate,  nine  councillors  to  compose  the 
legislative  council. 

The  house  of  representatives  consisted  of  members  chosen  every  two 
years  by  the  people,  the  basis  of  representation  being  one  member  for 
every  five  hundred  white  males.  The  first  house  of  representatives  con- 
sisted of  thirteen  members,  and,  by  act  of  congress,  the  whole  number 
of  representatives  could  not  exceed  twenty-five. 

The  judicial  power  of  the  territory  was  vested  in  the  superior  and 
inferior  courts  and  in  the  justices  of  the  peace;  the  superior  court  hav- 
ing three  judges,  whose  term  of  office  continued  four  years,  having 
original  and  appellate  jurisdiction  in  civil  and  criminal  cases. 

The  territory  could  send  one  delegate  to  congress.  Governor  Clark 
issued  a  proclamation  October  1,  1812,  required  by  congress,  reorganiz- 
ing the  districts  of  St.  Charles,  St.  Louis,  St.  Genevieve,  Cape  Girardeau 
and  New  Madrid,  into  five  counties  and  fixed  the  second  Monday  in 
November  following  for  the  election  of  a  delegate  to  congress  and  the 
members  of  the  territorial  house  of  representatives. 

Captain  William  Clark,  of  the  expedition  of  Lewis  and  Clark,  was 
the  first  territorial  governor  of  Missouri  Territory,  appointed  by  the 
president,  and  began  his  duties  in  1813. 

Edward  Hempstead,  Rufus  Easton,  Samuel  Hammond  and  Matthew 
Lyon  were  candidates  in  November  for  delegates  to  congress. 

Edward  Hempstead  was  elected,  being  the  first  territorial  delegate 
to  congress  from  Missouri.  He  served  one  term,  declining  a  second 
term,  and  was  instrumental  in  having  congress  pass  the  act  of  June  13, 
1812,   which   he   introduced,   confirming  the   title   to   lands   which   were 


90  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

claimed  by  the  people  by  virtue  of  Spanish  grants.  The  same  act  con- 
firmed to  the  people  "for  the  support  of  schools,"  the  title  to  village 
lots,  out-lots  or  common  field  lots,  which  were  held  and  enjoyed  by 
them,  at  the  time  of  the  cession  in  1803. 

Under  the  act  of  June  4,  1812,  the  first  general  assembly  held  its 
session  in  the  house  of  Joseph  Robidoux,  in  St.  Louis,  on  the  7th  of 
December,  1812.    The  names  of  the  members  of  the  house  were: 

St.  Charles:     John  Pitman  and  Robert  Spencer. 
St.   Louis:     David   Music,   Bernard   G.   Farrar,   William   C.   Carr  and 
Richard  Clark. 

Ste.  Genevieve:  George  Bullet,  Richard  S.  Thomas  and  Isaac  Mc- 
Gready. 

Gape  Girardeau:     George  F.  Bollinger  and  Spencer  Byrd. 

New  Madrid:     John  Shrader  and  Samuel  Phillips. 

John  B.  Lucas,  one  of  the  territorial  judges,  administered  the  oath 
of  oflSce.    William  C.  Carr  was  elected  speaker  and  Andrew  Seott,  clerk. 

The  house  of  representatives  proceeded  to  nominate  eighteen  per- 
sons from  whom  the  president  of  the  United  States,  with  the  senate, 
was  to  select  nine  for  the  council.  From  this  number  the  president 
chose  the  following: 

St.  Charles:     James  Flaugherty  and  Benjamin  Emmons. 

St.   Louis:     Auguste  Chouteau,   Sr.,  and  Samuel  Hammond. 

Ste.  Genevieve:     John  Scott  and  James  Maxwell. 

Cape  Girardeau:     William  Neeley  and  Joseph  Cavenor. 

New  Madrid:     Joseph  Hunter. 

The  legislative  council,  thus  chosen  by  the  president  and  senate, 
was  announced  by  Frederick  Bates,  secretary  and  acting  governor  of  the 
territory,  by  proclamation,  June  3,  1913,  and  fixing  the  first  Monday  in 
July  following,  as  the  time  for  the  meeting  of  the  legislature. 

In  the  meantime  the  duties  of  the  executive  office  were  assumed 
by  William  Clark.  The  legislature  accordingly  met,  as  required  by  the 
acting  governor's  proclamation,  in  July,  but  its  proceedings  were  never 
officially  published.  Consequently  but  little  is  known  in  reference  to  the 
workings  of  the  first  territorial  legislature  in  Missouri. 

From  the  imperfect  account  published  in  the  Missouri  Gazette  of 
that  day,  a  paper  which  had  been  in  existence  since  1808,  it  is  found 
that  laws  were  passed  regulating  and  establishing  weights  and  measures ; 
creating  the  office  of  sheriff,  providing  the  manner  for  taking  the  cen- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  91 

sus,  permanently  fixing  the  seats  of  justices  and  an  act  to  compensate 
its  own  members.  At  this  sesion  laws  were  also  passed  defining  crimes 
and  penalties,  law  in  reference  to  forcible  entry  and  detainer,  establish- 
ing courts  of  common  pleas,  incorporating  the  Bank  of  St.  Louis,  and 
organizing  a  part  of  Ste.  Genevieve  County  into  the  County  of  Wash- 
ington. 

The  next  session  of  the  Legislature  convened  in  St.  LohIs,  Decem- 
ber 6,  1813.  George  Bullet  of  Ste.  Genevieve  County,  was  speaker  elect, 
and  Andrew  Scott,  clerk,  and  William  Sullivan,  doorkeeper.  Since  the 
adjournment  of  the  former  Legislature,  several  vacancies  had  occurred, 
and  new  members  had  been  elected  to  fill  their  places.  Among  these 
was  Isreal  McCready,  from  the  county  of  Washington. 

The  president  of  the  Legislative  Council  was  Samuel  Hammond. 
No  journal  of  the  council  was  officially  published,  but  the  proceedings 
of  the  house  are  found  in  the  Gazette. 

At  this  session  of  the  Legislature  many  wise  and  useful  laws  were 
passed,  having  reference  to  the  temporal  as  well  as  the  moral  and  spiritual 
welfare  of  the  people.  Laws  were  enacted  for  the  suppression  of  vice 
and  immorality  on  the  Sabbath  day;  for  the  improvement  of  public  roads 
and  highways;  creating  the  ofl!ices  of  auditor,  treasurer  and  county  sur- 
veyor; regulating  the  fiscal  affairs  of  the  territory  and  fixing  the  bound- 
ary lines  of  New  Madrid,  Cape  Girardeau,  Washington  and  St.  Charles 
counties.  The  Legislature  adjourned  on  the  19th  of  January,  1914,  sine 
die. 

The  population  of  the  territory  as  shown  by  the  United  States  census 
in  1810,  was  20,845.  The  census  taken  by  the  Legislature  in  1814  gave 
the  territory  a  population  of  25,000.  This  enumeration  shows  the  county 
of  St.  Louis  contained  the  greatest  number  of  inhabitants,  and  the  new 
county  of  Arkansas  the  least,  the  latter  having  827,  and  the  former,  3,149. 

The  candidates  for  delegate  to  Congress  were  Rufus  Easton,  Samuel 
Hammond,  Alexander  McNair  and  Thomas  F.  Riddick.  Rufus  Easton 
and  Samuel  Hammond  had  been  candidates  at  the  preceding  election.  In 
all  the  counties,  excepting  Arkansas,  the  votes  aggregated  2,599,  of  which 
number  Mr.  Easton  received  965,  Mr,  Hammond,  Mr.  McNair  853  and  Mr. 
Riddick  (who  had  withdrawn  previously  to  the  election)  35.  Mr.  Easton 
was  elected. 

The  census  of  1814  showing  a  large  increase  in  the  population  of  the 
territory,  an  appointment  was  made  increasing  the  number  of  the  repre- 


92  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

sentatives  in  the  Territorial  Legislature  to  twenty-two.  The  General 
Assembly  began  its  session  in  St.  Louis,  December  5,  1814.  There  were 
present  on  the  first  day  twenty  representatives.  James  Caldwell  of  Ste. 
Genevieve  County  was  elected  speaker,  and  Andrew  Scott  who  had  been 
clerk  of  the  preceding  assembly,  was  chosen  clerk.  The  president  of  the 
council  was  William  Neelwy,  of  Cape  Girardeau  County. 

It  appeared  that  James  Maxwell,  the  absent  member  of  the  Council, 
and  Seth  Emmons,  member  elect  of  the  House  of  Representatives,  were 
dead.  The  county  of  Lawrence  was  organized  at  this  session,  from  the 
western  part  of  New  Madrid  County,  and  the  corporate  powers  of  St. 
Louis  were  enlarged.  In  1815  the  Territorial  Legislature  again  began 
its  session.  Only  a  partial  report  of  its  proceedings  are  given  in  the 
Gazette.  The  County  of  Howard  was  then  organized  by  bill  approved 
January  13,  1916,  from  St.  Louis  and  St.  Charles  Counties,  and  included 
practically  all  that  part  of  the  state  lying  north  of  the  Osage  and  south 
of  the  dividing  ridge  between  the  Mississippi  and  Missouri  rivers. 

The  next  session  of  the  Territorial  Legislature  commenced  its  session 
in  December,  1916.  During  the  sitting  of  this  Legislature  many  im- 
portant acts  were  passed.  It  was  then  the  "Bank  of  Missouri"  was  chart- 
ered and  went  into  operation.  In  the  fall  of  1817  the  "Bank  of  St.  Louis" 
and  the  "Bank  of  Missouri"  were  issuing  bills.  An  act  was  passed  chart- 
ering lottery  companies,  chartering  the  academy  at  Postosi,  and  incor- 
porating a  board  of  trustees  for  superintending  the  schools  in  the  town 
cf  St.  Louis.  Laws  were  also  passed  to  encourage  the  "killing  of  wolves, 
panthers  and  wild-cats." 

The  Territorial  Legislature  met  again  in  December,  1818  and  among 
other  things,  organized  the  counties  of  Pike,  Cooper,  Jefferson,  Franklin, 
Wayne,  Lincoln,  Madison,  Montgomery,  and  three  counties  in  the  southern 
part  of  Arkansas.  In  1819  the  Territory  of  Arkansas  was  formed  into 
a  separate  government  of  its  own. 


CHAPTER  V 


ADMISSION  AND  ORGANIZATION  OF  STATE. 


TERRITORIAL  LEGISLATURE  CONVENED  —  "MISSOURI  QUESTION"  —  STATE  AD- 
MITTED UNDER  CONDITIONS— COUNTIES— STATE  CONSTITUTION — FIRST  GOV- 
ERNOR— GENERAL  ASSEMBLY  ELECTED— GOVERNORS  OP  MISSOURI — UNITED 
STATES  SENATORS  FROM  MISSOURI — REPRESENTATIVES  FROM  RANDOLPH 
COUNTY. 


The  Territorial  Legislature  convened  in  December,  1818  and  at  this 
session  which  continued  into  1819,  application  was  made  by  this  legis- 
lature that  Missouri  Territory  be  admitted  into  the  Union  as  a  state. 
Slavery  existed  generally  in  the  territory  at  that  time  and  the  presenta- 
tion of  this  application  for  admission,  fanned  into  flame  the  slavery  ques- 
tion, not  only  in  Congress,  but  throughout  the  states  of  the  Union  and 
for  the  next  three  years  the  "Missouri  Question"  was  the  bone  of  con- 
tention, the  absorbing  political  theme.  Finally  by  an  act  of  Congress, 
concurred  in  by  both  House  and  Senate  on  February  28,  1821,  Missouri 
was  admitted  on  conditions.  At  a  special  session  of  the  Legislature  held 
at  St.  Charles  in  June  following,  assent  was  given  to  the  conditions  of 
admission  and  thereafter,  on  August  10,  1821,  President  Monroe  by 
proclamation  announced  the  admission  of  Missouri  into  the  Union  as  a 
State. 

At  the  time  Missouri  was  so  admitted,  its  territory  was  divided  into 
twenty-seven  counties,  and  by  subdividing  later,  we  now  have  one  hundred 
counties  within  the  state  as  admitted,  and  six  others  organized  within 
the  Platte  purchase,  and  added  to  the  State  in  1833,  and  the  city  of  St. 
Louis  which  is  a  county,  making  a  total  of  one  hundred  and  fifteen 
counties.     Any  reader,  curious  to  know,  may  trace  the  trend  of  the  set- 


94 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 


tlement  of  the  state  by  the  dates  of  the  organization  of  the  count 

in  the  table  following: 

County. 

Organized. 

Adir, 

January  29,  1841 

Andrew, 

January  29,  1841 

Atchison, 

January  14,  1845 

Audrain, 

December  17,  1836 

Barry, 

January     5,  1835 

Barton, 

December  12,  1835 

Bates, 

January  29,  1841 

Benton, 

January     3,  1835 

Bollinger, 

March     1,  1851 

Boone, 

November  16,  1820 

Buchannan, 

February  10,  1839 

Butler, 

February  27,  1849 

Caldwell, 

December  26,  1836 

Calloway, 

November  25,  1820 

Camden, 

January  29,  1841 

Cape  Girardeau, 

October     1,  1812 

Carroll, 

January     3,  1833 

Carter, 

March  10,  1859 

Cass, 

September  14,  1835 

Cedar, 

February  14,  1845 

Chariton, 

November  16,  1820 

Christian, 

March     8,  1860 

Clark, 

December  15,  1818 

Clay, 

January     2,  1822 

Clinton, 

January  15,  1833 

Cole, 

November  16,  1820 

Cooper, 

December  17,  1880 

Crawford, 

January  23,  1829 

Dade, 

January  29,  1841 

Dallas, 

December  10,  1844 

Daviess, 

December  29,  1836 

De  Kalb, 

February  25,  1845 

Dent, 

February  10,  1851 

Douglass, 

October  19,  1857 

Dunklin, 

February  14,  1845 

HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 


95 


Franklin, 

Gasconade, 

Gentry, 

Greene, 

Grundy, 

Harrison, 

Henry, 

Hickory, 

Holt, 

Howard, 

Howell, 

Iron, 

Jackson, 

Jasper, 

Jefferson, 

Johnson, 

Knox, 

Laclede, 

Lafayette, 

Lawrence, 

Lewis, 

Lincoln, 

Linn, 

Livingston, 

McDonald, 

Macon, 

Madison, 

Maries, 

Marion, 

Mercer, 

Miller, 

Mississippi, 

Moniteau, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 

Morgan, 

New  Madrid, 

Newton, 


December  11 

1818 

November  25 

1820 

February  12 

1841 

January  2 

1833 

January  2 

1843 

February  14 

1845 

December  13 

1834 

February  14 

1845 

February  15 

1841 

January  23 

1816 

March  2 

1857 

February  17 

1857 

December  15, 

1826 

January  29, 

1841 

December  8 

1818 

December  13, 

1834 

February  14, 

1845 

February  24, 

1849 

November  16, 

1820 

February  25, 

1845 

January  2, 

1833 

December  14, 

1818 

January  7, 

1837 

January  6, 

1837 

March  3, 

1849 

January  6, 

1837 

December  14, 

1818 

March  2, 

1845 

December  23, 

1826 

February  14, 

1845 

February  6, 

1837 

February  14, 

1845 

February  14, 

1845 

January  6, 

1831 

December  14, 

1818 

January  5, 

1833 

October  1, 

1812 

December  31, 

1838 

96 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 


Nodaway, 

Oregon, 

Osage, 

Ozark, 

Peniscot, 

Perry, 

Pettis, 

Phelps, 

Pike, 

Platte, 

Polk, 

Pulaski, 

Putnam, 

Ralls, 

Randolph, 

Ray, 

Reynolds, 

Ripley, 

St.  Charles, 

St.  Clair, 

St.  Francois, 

Ste.  Genevieve, 

St.  Louis, 

Saline, 

Schuyler, 

Scottland, 

Scott, 

Shannon, 

Shelby, 

Stoddard, 

Stone, 

Sullivan, 

Taney, 

Texas, 

Vernon, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Wayne, 


February  14, 

1845 

February  14, 

1845 

January  29 

1841 

January  29, 

1841 

February  19, 

1861 

November  16, 

1820 

January  26 

1833 

November  13, 

1857 

December  14, 

1918 

December  31, 

1838 

March  13, 

1835 

Decembe 

r  15, 

February  28, 

1845 

November  16, 

1820 

January  22, 

1829 

November  16, 

1820 

February  25, 

1845 

January  29, 

1841 

October  1 

1812 

January  29 

1841 

December  19 

1821 

October  1 

1812 

October  1 

1812 

November  25 

1820 

February  14 

1845 

January  29 

1841 

December  28 

1821 

January  29 

1841 

January  2 

1835 

January  2 

1835 

February  10 

1851 

February  16 

1845 

January  16 

1837 

February  14 

1835 

February  17 

1851 

January  5 

1833 

August  21 

1813 

December  11 

1818 

\ 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  97 

Webster,  March  3,  1855 

Worth,  February  8,  1861 

Wright,  January  29,  1841 

Prior  to  the  admission  of  Missouri  as  a  state,  a  convention  to  frame  a 
constitution  was  assembled  on  July  19,  1820;  a  constitution  was  framed 
and  adopted  in  anticipation  of  admission  as  a  state.  One  provision  of 
this  organic  law  proved  to  be  distasteful  to  Congress,  and  by  the  terms 
of  the  Missouri  Compromise,  Missouri  was  to  be  admitted  upon  condition 
that  this  objectionable  feature  of  its  constitution  be  eliminated,  which  was 
accordingly  done,  as  we  have  seen  in  a  preceding  paragraph. 

This  constitution  provided  that  an  election  be  held  on  August  28, 
1820  to  elect  a  governor,  and  other  state  officers,  members  of  the  Gen- 
eral Assembly,  county  officers.  United  States  Senators  and  a  member  of 
Congress.  Alexander  McNair  was  elected  governor,  a  total  of  9,132  votes 
being  cast.  John  Scott  was  elected  to  Congress  and  other  state  and 
county  officers  were  voted  for  and  elected  throughout  the  territory. 

The  General  Assembly  so  elected  in  August,  met  on  Sept.  19,  1820 
and  after  organizing  by  their  votes  elected  David  Barton  and  Thomas  H. 
Benton  to  the  United  States  Senate.  Mathias  McGirk,  John  D.  Cook,  and 
John  R.  Jones  were  appointed  judges  of  the  Supreme  Court,  each  to  hold 
office  until  he  reached  the  age  of  60  years.  When  the  territory  a  year 
later  finally  became  the  State  of  Missouri,  these  state  and  county  officers 
had  already  been  installed  in  office  and  when  Congress  convened  in  De- 
cember, 1821,  these  senators  and  the  representatives  were  sworn  in  and 
became  members. 

Thus  it  came  about  that  Alexander  McNair  became  the  first  governor 
of  Missouri,  and  Mathias  McGirk,  John  D.  Cook  and  John  R.  Jones  the 
first  judges  of  the  Supreme  Court  and  David  Barton  and  Thomas  H. 
Benton  the  first  United  States  Senators  from  the  State  of  Missouri. 

Both  of  these  senators  were  men  of  ability,  and  served  their  State, 
and  the  nation  as  well  with  fidelity.  David  Barton  served  for  ten  years, 
and  was  succeeded  by  Alexander  Buckner.  Senator  Benton  served  there- 
after continuously  for  thirty  years,  until  1850. 

Both  Barton  and  Benton  were  men  of  ability,  Benton,  especially  so, 
and  during  this  long  service  ranked  in  the  Senate  as  one  of  its  ablest 
members.  He  was  not  possesed  of  the  peronal  charm  nor  persuasive 
oratory  of  Henry  Clay,  nor  the  overpowering  eloquence  of  Daniel  Web- 
ster, but  in  practical  statesmanship,  he  was  probably  the  superior  of 
either  of  them. 


98 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 


GOVERNORS  OF  MISSOURI. 


Name. 


Alexander  McNair, 
Frederick  Bates, 
Abraham  J.  Williams, 
John  Miller, 
John  Miller, 
Daniel  Dunklin, 
Lilburn  W.  Boggs, 
Thomas  Reynolds, 
M.  M.  Marmaduke, 
John  C.  Edwards, 
Austin  A.  King, 
Sterling  Price, 
Trusten  Polk, 
Hancock  Jackson, 
Robert  M.  Stewart, 
Claiborne  F.  Jackson, 
Hamilton  R.  Gamble, 
Willard  P.  Hall, 
Thomas  C.  Fletcher, 
Joseph  W.  McGlurg, 
B.  Gratz  Brown, 
Silas  Woodson, 
Charles  H.  Hardin, 
John  S.  Phelps, 
Thos.  T.  Crittenden, 
John  S.  Marmaduke, 
Albert  P.  Moorehouse, 
David  R.  Francis, 
Wm.  J.  Stone, 
Lon  V.  Stephens, 
Alexander  M.  Dockery, 
Joseph  W.  Folk, 
Herbert  S.  Hadley, 

Governor  Majors  was 


County. 

St.  Louis, 
St.  Louis, 
Boone, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Washington, 
Jackson, 
Howard, 
Saline, 
Cole, 
Ray, 

Chariton, 
St.  Louis, 
Randolph, 
Buchanan, 
Saline, 
St.  Louis, 
Buchanan, 
St.  Louis, 
Camden, 
St.  Louis, 
Buchanan, 
Audrain, 
Greene, 
Johnson, 
St.  Louis  City, 
Nodaway, 
St.  Louis  City, 
Vernon, 
Cooper, 
Daviess, 
St.  Louis, 
Jackson, 
elected  in  1912  and  Governor 


Elected. 

August,  1820 

August,  1824 

Pres.  Senate 

Dec.  8,  1825 

August,  1828 

August,  1832 

August,  1836 

August,  1840 

Lieut.-Gov. 

August,  1844 

August,  1848 

August,  1852 

August,  1856 

Lieut.-Gov. 

August,  1857 

August,  1860 

Appointed 

Lieut.-Gov. 

November,  1864 

November,  1868 

November,   1870 

November,  1872 

November,  1874 

November,  1876 

November,  1880 

November,  1884 

Lieut.-Gov. 

November,  1888 

November,  1892 

November,  1896 

November,  1900 

November,  1904 

November,  1908 

Gardner  in  1916. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 


99 


UNITED  STATES  SENATORS  FROM  MISSOURI. 


When 

Elected.        Name.  Politics. 

1820.  David  Barton,  Whig, 

1820.  Thomas  H.  Benton,  Democrat, 

1824.  David  Barton,  Whig, 

1826.  Thomas  PI.  Benton,  Democrat, 

1880.  Alexander  Buckner,  Democrat, 
1832.  Thomas  H.  Benton,  Democrat, 
1834.  Lewis  F.  Linn,  Democrat, 
1836.  Lewis  F.  Linn,  Democrat, 
1838.  Thomas  H.  Benton,  Democrat, 

1842.  Lewis  F.  Linn,  Democrat, 

1843.  David  R.  Atchison,  Democrat, 

1844.  David  R.  Atchison,  Democrat, 
1844.  Thomas  H.  Benton,  Democrat, 
1849.  David  R.  Atchison,  Democrat, 
1851.  Henry  S.  Geyer,  Whig, 
1857.  James  S.  Green,  Democrat, 
1857.  Trusten  Polk,  Democrat, 

1861.  Waldo  P.  Johnson,  Democrat, 

1862.  Robert  Wilson,  Conservative, 

1862.  John  B.  Henderson,  Republican, 

1863.  B.  Gratz  Brown,  Republican, 
1867.  Charles  D.  Drake,  Republican, 

1869.  Carl  Schurz,  Republican, 

1870.  Daniel  F.  Jewett,  Republican, 

1871.  Francis  P.  Blair,  Democrat, 
1873.  Lewis  V.  Bogy,  Democrat, 
1875.  Francis  M.  Cockrell,  Democrat, 
1877.  David  H.  Armstrong,  Democrat, 
1879.  James  Shields,  Democrat, 
1879.  Geo.  G.  Vest,  Democrat, 

1881.  Francis  M.  Cockrell,  Democrat, 
1885.  Geo.  G.  Vest,  Democrat, 
1887.  Francis  M.  Cockrell,  Democrat, 
1891.  Geo.  G.  Vest,  Democrat, 


Residence. 

Howard 

St.  Louis 

Howard 

St.  Louis 

0-  Girai-deau 

St.  Louis 

St.  Genevieve 

St.  Genevieve 

St.  Louis 

C.  Girardeau 

Platte 

Platte 

St.  Louis 

Platte 

St.  Louis 

Lewis 

St.  Louis 

St.  Clair 

Andrew 

Pike 

St.  Louis 

St.  Louis 

St.  Louis 

St.  Louis 

St.  Louis 

St.  Louis 

Johnson 

St.  Louis 

Carroll 

Pettis 

Jchniion 

Jackson 

Johnson 

Jackson 


100  HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY 

1893.  Francis  M.  Cockrell,  Democrat,  Johnson 

1897.  Geo.  G.  Vest,  Democrat,  Jackson 

1899.  Francis  M.  Cockrell,  Democrat,  Johnson 

1903.  William  Joel  Stone,  Democrat,  Jefferson  City 

1905.  William  Warner,  Republican,  Kansas  City 

1909.  William  Joel  Stone,  Democrat,  Jefferson  City 

1911.  James  A.  Reed,  Democrat,  Kansas  City 

As  we  have  seen  Randolph  County  was  a  part  of  Howard  County 
auring  the  territorial  dayis  ^roxn  1816  uirtil  1820.  Chariton  County  was 
organized  in  1820  and  therefore  until  1829  Randolph  County  was  a  part 
of  Chariton  County.  After  Missouri  was  admitted  as  a  state  the  first 
representative  to  the  General  Assembly  from  Chariton  County  was  Hon. 
George  Burckhartt,  who  resided  about  six  miles  and  a  half  from'Hunts- 
ville  in  the  now  county  of  Randolph.  Mr.  Burckhartt  was  reelected  in 
1824  and  again  in  1826,  and  was  afterward  twice  elected  to  the  General 
Assembly  from  Randolph  County. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  members  of  House  of  Representatives  from 
Randolph  County: 

Charles  McLean,  1830 

Dr.  William  Fort,  1832 

Dr.  William  Fort,  1834 

Dr.  Waller  Head,  1836 

George  Burckhartt,  1838 

George  Burckhartt,  1840 

James  B.  Dameron,  1842 

Robert  Wilson,  1844 

Thomas  P.  Ruby,  1846 

P.  T.  Oliver,  1848 

Dabney  C.  Garth,  18.50 

James  F.  Wight,  1852 

Dabney  C.  Garth,  1854 

May  M.  Burton,  1856 

Henderson  D.  Wilcox,  1858 

J.  F.  Cunningham,  I860 

George  M.  Quinn,  1862 

Joseph  L.  Minor,  18(54 

Thomas  P.  White,  1866 

John  G.  Burton,  1869 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  101 

John  G.  Burton,  1871 

Henry  A.  Newman,  1873 

William  Quayle,  1875 

James  F.  Wight,  1877 

Franklin  P.  Wiley,  1879 

Franklin  P.  Wiley,  1881 

Walker  Wright,  1883 

W.  J.  HoUis,  1885 

Henry  A.  Newman,  1887 

Willard  C.  Hall,  1889 

William  B.  McCrary,  1891 

George  0.  Powell,  1893 

William  A.  Rothwell,  1895 

William  A.  Wight,  1897 

William  A.  Wight,  1899 

Stephen  W.  Creson,  1901 

Stephen  W.  Creson,  1903 

William  T.  Heathman,  '  1905 

William  T.  Heathman,  1907 

John  E.  Lynch,  1909 

John  E.  Lynch,  1911 

Rich  R.  Correll,  1913 

Rich  R.  Cojrell,  1915 


CHAPTER  VI 


EARLY  CONDITIONS. 


BOONSLICK  COUNTY  WITHIN  RESERVATION  OP  SAC  AND  FOX  INDIANS — INDIAN 
CLAIMS  EXTINGUISHED — COMING  OF  SETTLERS — FIRST  SETTLEMENTS — IM- 
MIGRATION— PIONEER  FARMING — THE  "RAZORBACK" — INDIAN  MENACE — 
BLACK  HAWK  WAR— SALE   OF  PUBLIC   LANDS. 

Prior  to  1808,  the  Boonslick  country,  north  of  the  Missouri  River  was 
within  the  reservation  of  the  Sac  and  Fox  Indians.  By  the  terms  of  the 
treaty  of  Paris,  the  French  government  ceded  Louisiana  Territory  to  the 
United  States  subject  to  the  claims  of  the  Indians  to  the  land.  These 
claims,  our  government  recognized,  consequently  the  United  States  could 
convey  no  clear  title  to  any  part  of  these  lands  until  the  claims  of  the 
Indians  had  been  extinguished  by  purchase.  It  appears  that  prior  to 
this  time  the  claim  of  the  Indians  had  been  so  extinguished  in  the  lands 
north  of  the  river  and  east  of  a  line  drawn  from  a  point  opposite  the 
mouth  of  the  Gasconade  River,  northerly  to  said  river  and  thence  down 
said  stream  to  the  Mississippi. 

The  question  of  the  ownership  of  the  lands  in  the  Boonlick  country, 
was  finally  set  at  rest  in  the  fall  of  1818  when  government  land  officers 
at  St.  Louis  and  Franklin  opened  their  doors  and  began  to  sell  these  lanas, 
after  the  Indian  claims  had  been  so  extinguished.  With  the  end  of  the 
War  of  1812,  the  tide  of  immigration  which  had  been  stayed  by  this  war, 
again  flowed  westward  in  an  ever  increasing  volume. 

These  new  settlers  came  as  best  they  could.  The  greater  number  in 
covered  wagons,  a  few  horseback,  and  possibly  some  single  men  afoot. 
The  better  to  do  families  came  in  two  or  more  wagons,  and  sometimes 
several    families    in    company.     Those    coming    in    wagons,    frequently 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  103 

brought  with  them  live  stock,  and  more  generally  necessary  tools  and 
equipment  such  as  axes,  saws,  hoes  and  other  edged  tools  and  probably 
spinning  wheels  and  looms  for  weaving  cloth  or  equipment  for  a  loom. 
Every  man  or  boy  able  to  shoulder  a  gun  brought  with  him  a  rifle  or 
gun  of  some  description. 

The  earlier  settlers  who  had  gone  before  had  blazed  the  way  and 
marked  the  trail.  Those  who  followed  gradually  converted  these  trails, 
into  roads.  There  were  no  bridges,  nor  legally  established  highways  m 
the  Boonslick  country  and  probably  none  west  of  St.  Charles,  and  conse- 
quently these  roads,  in  bad  weather  or  when  the  streams  were  swollen, 
were  not  always  passable.  But  the  early  settler  was  indomitable,  and  in 
the  end  reached  his  destination,  even  if  he  had  to  hew  his  way  through 
with  his  axe.  Thus  the  fii'st  highways  of  Missouri  were  established  by 
river. 

As  we  have  seen,  the  first  settlements  were  made  along  the  Missis- 
sippi from  St.  Louis  down  the  river  to  New  Madrid,  and  above,  at  St. 
Charles  on  the  Missouri,  prior  to  the  Louisiana  purchase.  Thereafter 
and  prior  to  the  War  of  1812,  settlements  had  been  established  up  the 
Mississippi  in  the  counties  of  Lincoln  and  Pike  further  north. 

Likewise  immigration  had  crept  westward  from  St.  Charles  along 
both  banks  of  the  Missouri,  and  settlements  had  been  effected  on  both 
sides  of  said  stream  as  far  west  as  Coopers  Bottom  in  the  Boonslick 
country.  I     i 

This  renewed  tide  of  immigration  which  set  in  during  the  year  1815, 
and  thereafter  continued  to  grow  steadily,  came  first  to  these  earlier 
settlements  there  to  acquire  knowledge  of  the  country  and  look  around 
for  themselves,  and  from  thence  this  tide  moved  up  the  Missouri  to  the 
mouth  of  the  Kaw  River,  where  Kansas  City  now  stands;  and  up  the 
Mississippi  to  the  mouth  of  the  Des  Moines  River. 

In  consequence  of  these  early  settlements  along  these  streams,  the 
country  bordering  on  the  river  was  the  first  organized  into  counties  in 
north  Missouri.  Prior  to  the  admission  of  Missouri  as  a  state,  seventeen 
counties  had  been  organized  in  North  Missouri,  all  of  them  being  river 
counties. 

St.  Charles  County  situated  at  the  confluence  of  the  Missouri  and 
Mississippi  Rivers  and  bordering  on  both,  was  as  we  have  seen  organized 
as  a  county  in  1812.  Northward,  along  the  west  bank  of  the  Mississippi, 
the  counties  of  Lincoln,  Pike  and  Clark  were  organized  in  1818  and  Ralls 


104  HISTORY  OP  EANDOLPH   COUNTY 

County  in  1820;  westward  of  St.  Charles  County  and  north  of  the  Mis- 
souri; Howard  County  was  organized  in  1816;  Montgomery  in  1818  and 
Callaway,  Boone,  Chariton,  and  Ray  in  1820.  South  of  the  Missouri, 
Cooper  and  Franklin  counties  were  organized  in  1818  and  Gasconade, 
Cole,  Saline  and  Lafayette  in  1820. 

These  early  settlements  in  the  river  counties,  by  reason  of  this  in- 
flux of  home  seekers,  grew  by  accretion  and  stretched  out  farther  and 
farther  into  the  country  away  from  the  rivers.  Other  initial  settlements 
further  west  and  north  were  established  and  likewise  grew  away  from 
the  rivers.  The  timbered  counties  were  the  first  settled.  Chariton 
County  to  the  east,  and  Ray  and  Clay  counties  west,  were  peopled,  before 
Carroll  County  which  is  largely  a  prairie  county.. 

^  In  these  days  the  question  is  often  asked  why  it  was  that  these  early 
settlers  neglected  the  rich  prairie  lands,  and  reared  their  cabins  in  the 
forest,  upon  inferior  lands  in  many  instances,  where  they  must  fell  the 
timber  and  burn  the  brush  before  they  could  plant,  when  the  prairie 
stood  ready  for  the  plow.  This  question  can  be  answered  only  by  putting 
our  feet  in  the  shoes  of  these  pioneers. 

It  must  be  borne  in  mind  that  the  greater  number  who  came  to 
north  Missouri  prior  to  1821  were  from  central  Kentucky,  Tennessee  and 
states  further  east,  and  over  roads  much  of  the  way  that  would  today 
be  regarded  unfit  to  travel.  They  came  in  wagons  and  they  could  bring 
with  them  only  such  of  their  belongings  as  were  indispensable.  Agri- 
cultural implements  were  out  of  the  question.  They  could  not  be  brought, 
hence  the  settler  must  equip  himself  with  such  implement  he  could  get 
or  construct  at  his  journey's  end. 

Good  water  and  an  abundance  of  fuel  to  warm  up  their  open  cabins 
in  winter  were  essentials,  and  fence  rails  to  inclose  field  and  garden  with 
a  substantial  fence,  sufficiently  high  and  strong  enough  to  keep  out  Ihe 
deer  and  elk  and  his  neighbors  stock  were  indispensable. 

The  timbered  lands  extending  back  from  the  river  abounded  in  springs 
of  cool  pure  water,  and  a  cabin  in  the  woods  near  a  spring  brought  both 
of  these  essentials  to  its  door. 

found  adjacent  to  the  prairie,  if  not  too  remote  from  a  settlement,  was  a 
lucky  find  and  the  land  thereabout  was  quickly  taken  up  by  some  home- 
seeker.  Such  locations  were  desirable,  as  the  settlers  stock  whether  much 
or  little  had  ample  room  to  graze  on  the  prairie  and  the  timber  as  a  rule 
was  nearby. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  105 

But  the  breaking  of  the  tough  prairie  sod  and  subjecting  this  land 
to  cultivation  was  a  task  to  be  accomplished  at  a  later  date  than  we  now 
have  in  view- 

The  wooden  plow  or  the  plow  with  an  iron  shear  and  wooden  mold- 
board,  the  only  kind  to  be  had  at  these  times,  were  wholly  inadequate  to 
break  and  turn  the  tough  prairie  sod.  As  late  as  the  middle  of  the  last 
century,  the  prairie  plow  with  its  heavy  iron  shear,  moldboard,  coulter 
and  massive  beam  and  rods  to  strengthen  and  small  wooden  wheels  of 
unequal  sizes,  set  under  and  at  right  angle  with  the  beam,  one  wheel  to 
track  in  the  furrow  last  made,  and  the  other  on  the  sod  to  steady  the 
plow  and  prevent  it  from  tipping,  was  a  clumsy  and  cumbersome  imple- 
ment. Such  plow  when  in  operation  was  usually  drawn  slowly  along  by 
three  yoke  of  oxen,  but  it  served  to  do  the  work  as  it  had  been  doing 
before  for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  or  more. 

After  the  sod  was  thus  turned  it  had  to  lie  and  rot  for  a  season 
before  it  could  be  again  plowed.  The  man  with  a  hoe  could  plant  corn 
on  this  newly  turned  sod  and  grow  sod  corn  if  the  spring  and  summer 
rainfall  was  ample.     If  a  dry  year  the  corn  "burned"  and  yielded  no  grain. 

The  prairie  was  therefore  impossible  to  these  early  settlers.  In  the 
timber  the  settler  could  with  axe,  mall  and  iron  wedge  and  wooden  glut 
fall  the  timber,  split  his  rails,  and  erect  his  fences  and  complete  his  in- 
closure.  The  laps  of  the  trees  thus  felled  would  furnish  him  his  next 
winter's  wood.  Then  with  axe  he  could  belt,  or  deaden  the  remaining 
timber,  scratch  the  virgin  soil,  by  ploughing  around  the  stumps,  with 
his  wooden  or  combination  plow,  and  by  the  industrious  use  of  hoe,  and 
plow  grow  corn  for  his  stock. 

His  hogs,  if  any,  great  and  small  could  provide  for  themselves  in 
the  woods  when  spring  came  and  unless  they  strayed  away  and  went  wild, 
the  settler  was  assured  of  hog  and  hominy  when  fall  came. 

The  hog  of  that  period,  known  as  "raisorback"  was  a  rustler  and 
could  take  care  of  himself  in  the  forest  without  human  aid,  and  is  given 
further  notice  in  these  pages.  Another  reason  why  these  new  comers 
settled  in  the  timbered  country  was  the  fear  of  the  Indians.  The  first  of 
these  settlers  came  within  a  year  after  the  end  of  the  Indian  War  in 
the  Boonslick  country,  and  the  last  of  them  within  less  than  six  years 
thereafter,  while  Missouri  was  yet  a  territory. 

During  all  of  this  period  the  Indian  was  regarded  as  a  menace.  The 
settler,  however  courageous  and  fearless  he  might  be,  for  the  peace  and 


106  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

safety  of  his  family  and  live  stock,  preferred  to  settle  within  or  near  the 
outskirts  of  an  established  settlement,  where  aid  could  be  had  in  case  of 
danger.  Indeed,  it  was  not  until  the  Sac  and  Fox  Indians  had  been  finally 
defeated,  the  Black  Hawk  War  ended,  in  1833,  and  these  Indians  were 
removed  entirely  out  of  this  state,  and  that  part  of  Illinois  to  the  east, 
that  all  fear  of  danger  from  that  source  was  finally  removed  from  the 
minds  of  our  people.  During  the  first  years  that  we  are  now  dealing 
with  the  Indians  outnumbered  the  whites  in  the  Boonslick  Country,  and 
westward.  They  had  no  love  for  any  white  person  that  spoke  English, 
and  the  settler  disliked  and  distrusted  the  Indian  as  much  or  more.  There 
was  no  further  warfare  in  the  Boonslick  Country,  no  more  scalping,  but 
an  armed  truce  instead,  in  time  of  peace  that  might  not  last. 

No  surveys  of  the  public  lands  of  the  Territory  of  Missouri  was  begun 
until  December,  1816.  The  only  lands  legally  surveyed  prior  to  that  time 
were  the  French  and  Spanish  claims.  This  survey  began  the  last  of  the 
year  1816,  progressed  slowly  and  it  was  not  until  August  3,  1818,  that 
the  first  land  sale  by  the  United  States  government  was  held  in  St. 
Louis  and  on  November  2,  1818,  the  first  in  the  Boonslick  Country  at 
Franklin,  Howard  County.  These  first  sales  were  made  at  public  vendue 
to  the  highest  bidder.  The  settlers  had  an  understanding  that  they  would 
not  bid,  the  one  against  the  other.  A  large  number  of  people  attended 
the  land  upon  which  he  had  "squatted,"  and  to  a  decree  mproved,  we 
competition  and  spirited  bidding  for  choice  tracts  among  these  visitors. 
Whether  or  not  any  settler  was  by  this  sale  deprived  of  his  cabin,  and 
the  land  upon  which  he  had  "squatted,',  and  to  a  decree  improved,  we 
are  not  advised. 

The  settlers  in  the  Franklin  land  district  at  this  time  had  given 
notice  to  the  officers  of  the  land  office,  claiming  the  land  upon  which  eacl'-. 
resided  by  right  of  preemption  or  that  they  had  given  notice  to  the  land 
oflSce  that  they  claimed  and  intended  to  purchase  some  certain  tract. 

In  March,  1818,  Congress  passed  an  act  whereby  the  right  to  pre- 
empt land  was  granted  the  settler  and  made  legal. 


CHAPTER  VII 


EARLY  SETTLEMENTS  IN  THE  BOONSLICK  COUNTRY. 


DANIEL  BOONE'S  FIRST  EXPEDITION  HERE— HE  DISCOVERS  A  SALT  SPRING — 
BENJAMIN  COOPER  AND  FAMILY  SETTLE  HERE — AN  ATTRACTIVE  COUNTRY 
— FIRST  PERMAJSTENT  SETTLEMENT — A  COLONY  OF  KENTUCKIANS  COME — 
ROADS — FIRST    SETTLERS    IN    BOONSLICK    COUNTRY. 

Daniel  Boone  in  some  one  of  his  hunting  and  trapping  expeditions 
discovered  a  salt  spring  about  eight  miles  northwest  of  the  old  town  of 
Franklin  in  Howard  County.  Afterward,  in  1807,  Boone's  sons  Nathan 
and  Daniel  M.  made  salt  at  this  spring,  and  it  is  probable  that  the  elder 
Boone  had  made  salt  there  prior  to  this  time.  This  salt  spring  was 
given  the  name  of  Boonslick,  and  all  the  country  thereabouts  without 
limit  was  known  as  the  Boonslick  Country. 

In  the  spring  of  1808,  Benjamin  Cooper  and  family,  consisting  of 
his  wife  and  five  sons,  moved  into  the  Boonslick  Country,  built  a  cabin 
and  cleared  some  ground  about  two  miles  southwest  of  Boonslick.  He 
had  thus  far  progressed  toward  making  a  permanent  home,  when  Gov- 
ernor Lews  issued  an  order,  directing  him  to  return  below  the  mouth  of 
the  Gasconade  River.  This  order  was  given  because  trouble  with  the 
Indians,  which  soon  occurred,  was  anticipated,  and  the  location  he  had 
chosen  was  so  far  away,  that  the  government  could  extend  him  no  pro- 
tection; another  reason  was  that  Cooper  was  trespassing  upon  lands  that 
belonged  to  the  Indians.  In  obedience  to  this  order  he  returned  to  Loutre 
Island,  and  remained  there  until  1810. 

This  section  of  the  Boonslick  Country  was  not  destined  to  be  left 
long  to  the  reign  of  the  wild  beasts  and  the  savage  Indian.  It  was  at- 
tractive and  presented  advantages  which  those  seeking  homes  where  they 


108  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

could  find  the  richest  of  lands  and  the  most  healthful  of  climates,  could 
not,  and  did  not  fail  to  receive  attention.  Its  fertile  soil  promised,  with 
little  labor,  the  most  abundant  of  harvests.  Its  forests  were  filled  with 
every  variety  of  game,  and  its  streams  with  all  kinds  of  fish.  It  is  no 
wonder  that  those  seeking  homes  looked  upon  this  section  as  a  "promised 
land,"  where  provisions  could  be  found,  and  that  they  should  select  and 
settle  the  rich  lands  here,  accommodating  themselves  to  the  scanty  fare 
of  the  wilderness,  and  risking  all  the  dangers  from  the  wild  beasts  and 
the  Indians  who  lived  in  great  numbers  nearby. 

Two  years  after  the  first  settlement  of  Benjamin  Cooper  and  after 
his  removal  to  Loutre  Island,  the  first  permanent  and  abiding  settlement 
was  made  in  this  section;  this  was  but  a  forerunner  of  the  stream  of 
emigration  which  soon  followed. 

On  Feb.  20,  1810,  Benjamin  Cooper  with  several  others  returned  to 
what  is  now  Howard  County.  They  came  upon  the  north  side  of  the  Mis- 
souri from  Loutre  Island,  and  all  of  them,  except  Hannah  Cole,  the  widow 
of  William  Temple  Cole,  and  her  family  and  Stephen  Cole  and  his  family, 
settled  in  Howard  County,  north  of  the  Missouri  River.  Hannah  Cole 
and  Stephen  Cole,  together  with  their  families,  settled  in  what  is  now 
Cooper  County. 

Benjamin  Cooper  settled  in  Howard  County,  at  the  same  place  and 
in  the  cabin  which  he  had  built  two  years  before.  This  cabin  had  not  been 
disturbed  by  the  Indians,  although  they  had  occupied  all  the  adjacent 
country  and  doubtless  had  passed  it  many  times. 

In  the  year  1810  a  colony  of  Kentuckians,  consisting  of  from  fifty 
to  a  hundred,  families  came  to  and  settled  in  that  part  of  the  Boonslick 
Country,  now  Howard  and  Cooper  counties.  These  settlers  located  on 
both  sides  of  the  Missouri  River,  the  greater  number  on  the  north  side, 
between  Rocheport  and  the  west  end  of  Coopers  Bottom.  Many  of  them 
became  the  neighbors  of  Benjamin  Cooper,  the  first  settler. 

When  the  Coopers  and  the  Coles  came  to  this  section,  there  was 
neither  road  nor  path  for  them  to  pass  through  the  wilderness,  save  here 
and  there  the  trail  of  the  savage  or  the  path  of  the  wild  beast.  They 
had  to  take  care  as  to  the  course  in  which  to  travel;  any  opening  which 
they  could  find  in  the  thickets,  or  through  the  forest,  that  would  permit 
the  passage  of  their  wagons  and  animals,  and  frequently  were  compelled 
to  chop  their  way  through  with  the  axe,  an  essential  accouterment  of  the 
early  pioneer. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  109 

Names  of  first  settlers  in  Boonslick  Country  and  whence  they  came: 
Those  who  settled  in  the  central  Boonslick  Country  in  1810  are  as 
follow:  ■  From  Madison  County,  Ky.,  Lieut.  Col.  Benjamin  Cooper,  Francis 
Cooper,  William  Cooper,  Daniel  Cooper,  John  Cooper,  Capt.  Sarshall 
Cooper,  Braxton  Cooper,  Sr.,  Joseph  Cooper,  Stephen  Cooper,  Braxton 
Cooper,  Ji-.,  Robert  Cooper,  James  Hancock,  Albert  Hancock,  William 
Berry,  John  Berry,  Robert  Irvin,  Robert  Brown,  Joseph  Wolfscale,  William 
Thorpe,  John  Thorpe,  Josiah  Thorpe,  James  Thorpe,  Gilead  Rupe,  James 
Jones,  John  Peak,  William  Wolfscale,  Adam  Woods.  From  Estill  County, 
Ky.,  Amos  Ashcraft,  Otho  Ashcraft,  Jesse  Ashcraft,  James  Alexander. 
From  Tennessee,  John  Ferrell,  Henry  Ferrell,  Robert  Hancock.  Fi'om 
Virginia,  James  Kile.  From  South  Carolina,  Peter  Popineau.  Previous 
residence  unknown,  John  Busby,  James  Anderson,  Middleton  Anderson, 
William  Anderson.  From  Wayne  County,  Ky.,  Hannah  Jennie,  Mattie, 
Dickie,  Nellie,  James,  Holbert,  Stephen,  William,  Samuel,  Stephen,  Phoebe 
(Stephen's  wife),  James,  Rhoda,  Mark,  Nellie,  and  Polly  Cole. 

Those  from  Wayne  County,  Kentucky,  settled  south  of  the  river. 
The  women  belonging  to  some  of  these  families  on  the  north  side  of  the 
river  did  not  arrive  until  the  following  July  or  August.  There  may  have 
been  others  but  the  above  list  is  all  that  we  are  able  to  trace. 


CHAPTER  VIII 


CHARACTERISTICS  AND  CUSTOMS  OF  PIONEERS. 


SELF-RELIANT  AND  BRAVJ:— FREE  FROM  PRIDE  AND  VANITY — GOOD  WILD  BE- 
TWEEN NEIGHBORS  —  MANY  WELL-TO-DO  —  SLAVE  OWNERS— PRODUCTS — 
FIRST  HOMES — COOKING — GAME  IN  ABUNDANCE— THE  PIONEER  FAMILY — 
SUPPLIED    THEIR    OWN   WANTS. 

During  the  years  preceding  the  organization  of  the  county,  for  the 
settlers  it  was  a  time  of  self  reliance  and  brave,  persevering  toil;  of 
privations  cheerfully  endured  in  hope  of  a  better  time  to  come.  The 
experience  of  one  settler  was  just  about  the  same  as  that  of  others. 
Most  of  the  settlers  were  poor;  they  faced  the  same  hardships  and  stood 
generally  on  an  equal  footing.  They  kept  no  record  of  events  nor  of 
the  privations  they  were  called  upon  to  endure,  nor  of  incidents  in  their 
lives  nor  happenings  in  the  community  that  would  be  of  interest  at  this 
time.  They  were  too  busily  engaged  in  making  history  to  preserve;) 
historical  events.  This  is  a  matter  of  regret  now,  for  it  was  then  the 
corner  stones  of  all  the  county's  history  and  future  prosperity  were  laid. 

If  these  early  settlers  were  poor  they  were  free  from  pride  and  vanity, 
and  the  anxiety  that  attends  the  position  of  wealth.  There  were  no 
fashion  plates  in  those  days  and  they  were  not  concerned  in  dress  nor 
display  of  that  kind.  Other  people's  eyes  cost  them  nothing.  They  had 
few  near  neighbors  but  they  were  on  the  best  of  terms  with  those  they 
had.  There  was  no  room  for  jealousy  or  strife  to  creep  in.  A  com- 
mon interest  and  a  common  sympathy  bound  them  together.  They  were 
a  little  world  to  themselves,  far  removed  from  the  east  of  the  Mississippi, 
bound  together  by  the  consciousness  of  common  hardships,  attended  with 
some  peril  and  they  must  necessarily  depend  the  one  upon  the  other  and 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  111 

make  common  cause  in  case  of  need.  If  disaster  came  to  any  one  settler, 
if  his  cabin  burned  or  was  blown  down,  the  neighbors  assembled  at  once 
to  assist  the  unfortunate  to  rebuild  his  home,  as  if  they  were  members  of 
the  same  family  bound  together  by  ties  of  blood. 

What  is  said  here  with  reference  to  Randolph  County  would  hold 
good  throughout  the  other  settlements  of  that  period  within  the  state. 
The  very  nature  of  their  surroundings  made  it  necessary  for  them  to  dwell 
together  in  this  spirit.  They  were  thus  living  before  there  was  an  officer 
of  the  law  in  the  county.  The  only  protection  each  had  was  in  the  good 
will  and  friendship  of  his  neighbors.  The  ill  will  of  his  neighbors  justly 
merited  would  ostracize  him  and  in  the  end  drive  him  out  of  the  com- 
munity. The  indignation  of  a  pioneer  community  was  more  potent  even 
than  the  law. 

What  we  have  said  above  is  specially  applicable  to  the  first  comers 
who  settled  in  Randolph  County  prior  to  the  admission  of  the  state  and 
shortly  thereafter. 

Every  settler  who  came  in  the  early  days,  however,  was  not  penni- 
less. In  1820  a  census  was  taken  in  the  state  of  Missouri  and  the  popu- 
lation all  told  was  70,000.  Of  this  total  population,  12,000  in  round  num- 
bers were  negro  slaves.  The  influx  of  population  after  the  admission  of 
the  state  brought  many  comparatively  well-to-do  men  together  with  their 
families  and  oft  times  as  many  slaves  as  there  were  members  in  his 
family,  into  these  river  and  contigious  counties  from  Boone  County  to 
the  then  state  line.  This  class,  as  a  rule,  bought  farms  improved  or 
partially  improved  and  oft  times  the  pioneer  seller  would  go  farther  back 
into  the  country  and  begin  his  pioneer  life  anew.  The  growing  of  hemp 
and  tobacco  with  slave  labor  soon  became  a  lucrative  business  and  within 
a  decade  after  Randolph  County  was  organized  and  prior  thereto  in  these 
river  counties,  comfortable  houses  were  erected  here  and  there,  and  wealth 
began  to  accumulate,  not  great  fortunes  such  as  we  have  today  but 
competent  ones  that  enabled  the  sons  and  daughters  of  the  wealthier 
class  to  attend  seminaries  and  colleges. 

The  first  cabins  erected  in  the  county  were  temporary  and  less  stable 
than  the  log  houses  that  shortly  took  their  places.  To  erect  a  log  house 
required  help,  hence  the  preliminary  cabin  that  must  be  raised  by  the 
unaided  efforts  of  the  settler  was  necessarily  a  make  shift  and  of  course 
endured  for  a  few  seasons  only,  until  a  more  stable  structure  could  be 
erected.  No  accurate  description  can  be  given  at  this  late  date  of  these 
temporary  structures. 


112  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

As  the  tide  of  emigration  was  strong  after  1818,  the  community  was 
speedily  formed  and  log  houses  of  one  or  more  rooms  were  then  erected. 
These  were  oft  times  rude  enough.  Some  of  the  cabins  were  constructed 
of  rough  logs,  notched  and  laid  up  one  on  top  of  the  other,  while  others 
were  constructed  of  hewn  logs  likewise  notched  and  laid  up  and  were  gen- 
erally a  story  and  a  half  high,  and  all  cabins  alike  were  covered  with  clap- 
boards, rived  usually  out  of  oak  trees  somewhat  thicker  than  more  than 
double  the  length  of  an  ordinary .  shingle.  Many  of  the  chimneys  were 
made  of  sticks  covered  with  clay,  the  fireplace  being  lined  with  stones. 
Cracks  between  the  logs  were  chincked  and  daubed  with  mud  so  as  to 
keep  out  both  wind  and  rain.  The  doors  of  these  cabins  were  usually 
hung  on  wooden  hinges  and  secured  when  closed  by  a  wooden  inside  latch 
lifted  by  a  string  through  a  hole  in  the  door  so  that  the  door  could  be 
opened  from  the  outside,  and  all  that  was  required  to  lock  the  door  was 
to  pull  in  the  string. 

There  were  no  mills  in  Randolph  County  when  the  first  settlers  eame, 
neither  sawmills  nor  gristmills,  and  when  planks  were  needed  or  when 
they  were  indispensable,  they  were  sawed  by  hand,  two  men  performing 
the  work. 

Cooking  was  done  in  vessels  over  the  fire  in  the  fire  place  and  in  sum- 
mer frequently  under  the  shade  of  a  nearby  tree. 

The  cabin  erected  and  the  shelter  thus  secured  for  the  family,  the 
next  work  for  the  pioneer  was  to  start  his  clearing  so  that  bread  could 
be  had  the  following  season.  The  trees  were  felled,  or  many  of  them, 
and  the  bodies  converted  into  rails  and  the  laps  into  fire  wood  for  winter 
use.  Enclosures  were  erected  wherein  to  confine  what  livestock  the  set- 
tler possessed.  Trees  unfit  for  rails  were  deadened  by  cutting  through 
the  bark  of  the  tree  all  the  way  around  thereby  girdling  it,  and  all  the 
brush  on  the  clearing  was  burned.  Of  course  the  tree  put  out  no  leaves 
the  following  year  and  cutting  down  and  converting  the  same  into  fire 
wood  was  the  work  of  a  later  day.  After  the  land  to  be  cultivated  was 
cleared  and  fenced,  the  amount  of  work  to  be  done  and  the  time  required 
depended  upon  the  size  of  the  clearing.  The  settler  was  then  ready  to 
plow  and  plant.  It  goes  without  saying  that  the  farmer  and  his  sons 
had  worked  incessantly  until  the  planting  season  came. 

The  family  of  the  pioneer  was  seldom  in  want  of  food.  The  woods 
and  prairies  abounded  in  game.  Elk,  deer,  bear,  rabbits  and  squirrels 
innumerable  could  be  obtained  by  the  hunter.    The  pioneer  was  an  ex- 


HISTOEY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  113 

pert  rifle  shot  as  a  rule,  and  fresh  meat  could  be  obtained  in  an  hour's 
hunt.  Game  birds  also  abounded.  Wild  geese,  ducks,  wild  turkey  and 
prairie  chickens  could  easily  be  found.  Fur  bearing  animals,  the  beaver, 
otter,  mink,  raccoon  and  others  were  abundant  and  many  a  pioneer  pet 
traps  in  winter  and  secured  furs  which  were  readily  sold  for  cash. 

The  pioneer  family  like  the  neighborhood  was  necessarily  based  on 
the  community  plan.  The  pioneer  must  furnish  the  food  and  the  ma- 
terial for  clothing  and  shoes,  while  the  pioneer's  wife  equally  the  head  of 
the  family  in  her  department  carded,  spun,  wove  and  made  the  clothing 
with  the  help  of  her  daughters  and  servants,  and  also  prepared  and  served 
the  meals.  There  were  times,  no  doubt,  when  the  wives  of  the  very  early 
pioneers  were  compelled  to  card  the  wool  as  well  as  to  spin  and  weave. 
Such  carding  was  done  by  hand  and  just  how  this  now  seemingly  im- 
possible achievement  was  accomplished  this  writer  will  not  attempt  to 
describe.  Mills  to  grind  com  and  saw  timber  were  indispensable  and 
were  early  established.  These  mills  were  operated  by  water  or  horse 
power.  The  carding  mill  was  equally  indispensable  and  these  were  estab- 
lished here  and  there  as  promptly  as  were  the  sawmills.  Thereafter  the 
wool  was  taken  to  the  carding  machine,  converted  into  rolls  and  the 
wives,  daughters  and  women  servants  spun,  wove,  fashioned  and  made 
all  the  winter  wear  and  likewise  much  if  not  all  of  the  summer  wear  of 
flax  or  hemp.  The  summer  wear  of  the  family,  especially  the  working 
clothes,  was  home  spun,  made  of  flax  or  hemp  milled  and  was  called 
"tow  linen".  A  suit  of  homemade  flax,  skilfully  milled,  spun  and  woven 
and  properly  bleached,  such  as  the  farmers  and  their  negro  slaves  wore 
in  the  antibellum  days,  would  bring  more  on  the  market  today  fashion- 
ably cut,  and  would  be  much  superior  to  the  present  palm  beach  suits 
both  in  durability  and  comfort.  The  wearing  of  homespun  clothing  did 
not  end  with  the  pioneer  days,  but  continued  until  the  Civil  War  and 
ended  only  when  the  slaves  were  freed. 

There  may  have  been  differences  of  opinion  and  some  bickering  be- 
tween man  and  wife  in  those  days,  but  these  old  pioneers  were  usually 
prudent  and  sensible  men,  and  having  much  to  do  themselves  did  what 
they  were  told  to  do,  when  in  and  about  the  house,  by  the  other  head  ot 
the  family.  In  any  event,  the  early  chronicles  of  Randolph  County  make 
no  mention  of  a  pioneer  wife  such  as  we  have  described  deserting  her 
pioneer  husband  and  her  family.  The  wife  had  too  much  responsibility 
to  indulge  in  such  pranks,  besides,  like  Miss  Betsy  Trotwood's  niece,  she 
had  no  place  to  go. 


J' 


114  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  winter  wear  of  the  pioneer  and  his  sons  and  servants  was  home- 
spun jeans,  cotton  warp  and  all  wool  woof  woven  three  or  four  ply. 
The  only  difference  between  the  coat  of  the  colored  servant  and  the 
master  was  in  the  shape  and  color.  The  master's  coat  was  usually  dyed 
with  indigo  and  was  called  blue  jeans,  while  the  suit  of  the  servant 
and  oftimes  the  working  clothes  of  the  other  members  of  the  family 
was  dyed  with  walnut  bark  or  made  of  wool  from  the  backs  of  black 
sheep  and  was  therefore  brown. 


CHAPTER  IX 


PIONEER  SETTLERS  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


SILVER  CREEK  TOWNSHIP  SETTLED  FIRST — WILLIAM  HOLMAN  FIRST  SETTLER- 
SETTLERS  MOSTLY  FROM  THE  SOUTH — DR.  FORT  FIRST  PHYSICIAN — EARLY 
SETTLERS — ORIGINAL  TO  WNSHIPS— PIONEERS  WERE  OF  HIGH  TYPE— OTHER 
EARLY  SETTLERS. 

The  Missouri  River  at  Glasgow,  flowing  eastward  to  that  point, 
turns  abruptly  to  the  south  and  flows  south  for  approximately  twenty 
miles;  thence  east  to  Rocheport.  Howard  County  lies  largely  in  this 
bend  of  the  river,  the  northwest  corner  being  about  six  miles  north  of 
Glasgow.  In  consequence,  Randolph  County,  adjoining  on  the  north, 
is  nearer  Glasgow  than  any  other  point  on  the  river.  As  we  have  seen 
the  first  settlements  were  along  the  river  and  from  thence  grew  inland. 
Silver  Creek  township  in  the  southwest  corner  of  Randolph  County  is 
from  eight  to  fifteen  miles  from  Glasgow,  and  it  was  in  this  part  of 
the  county  the  first  settlement  was  made.  It  is  conceded  that  William 
Holman  was  the  first  permanent  settler  in  Randolph  county.  He  located! 
near  a  spring  in  Silver  Creek  township  in  1818.  Following  close  on  the 
heels  of  William  Holman,  came  James  Holman,  a  brother  of  William, 
and  James  Dysart,  the  same  or  following  year. 

FVom  this  beginning  the  settlement  of  Randolph  County  grew  rapidly 
east  and  north.  From  and  after  the  close  of  the  war  of  1812  and  the 
treaty  of  peace  with  the  Indians,  the  tide  of  immigration  from  the  older 
states  east  of  the  Mississippi  grew  stronger  year  by  year.  Kentucky 
contributed  by  far  the  greater  number  of  settlers  and  Tennessee,  North 
Carolina,  Virginia  and  Maryland  each  contributed  large  numbers.  Mis- 
souri was  admitted  as  a  slave  state'  and  while  the  free  states  farther 


116  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

north  contributed,  the  number  was  relatively  small  compared  with  the 
numbers  coming  in  from  the  states  south  of  the  Mason  and  Dixon  line. 

Within  three  years  after  the  coming  of  William  Holman  the  settle- 
ment thus  begun  had  stretched  east  beyond  Higbee  and  north  beyond 
Huntsville,  and  probably  an  occasional  settler  had  found  his  way  to  the 
neighborhood  of  Middle  Grove  and  Milton  and  other  parts  of  Randolph 
County. 

In  the  year  of  1820,  Dr.  William  Fort,  the  first  physician  to  locate  in 
Randolph  County,  settled  on  land  about  three  and  a  half  miles  west  of 
the  site  of  Huntsville^  and  he  and  Tolman  Gorham  established  and  oper- 
ated salt  works  at  the  Salt  Spring,  now  known  as  Randolph  Springs. 
These  works  they  continued  to  operate  for  many  years  thereafter,  fur- 
nishing salt  for  a  wide  stretch  of  surrounding  territory. 

Among  other  early  settlers  of  Silver  Creek  and  Salt  Springs  town- 
ships were  John  Viley,  Nicholas  Dysart,  Cornelius  Vaughn,  Iverson  Sears, 
John  Sears,  Asa  Kerby,  Hardy  Sears,  David  R.  Denny,  Younger  Row- 
land, John  Rowland,  Archie  Rowland,  Samuel  Humphreys,  Wright  Hill, 
Rev.  James  Barnes,  Uriah  Davis,  Abraham  Goss,  Isiah  Humphreys,  Rev. 
S.  C.  Davis,  James  Davis,  Jacob  Medley,  Thomas  Mayo,  Sr.,  Charles 
Mathis,  Tillman  Bell,  James  Beattie,  Charles  Finnell,  Val.  Mayo,  Charles 
Baker,  Sr.,  Jos.  M.  Baker,  Charles  M.  Baker,  Jr.,  Jer.  Summers,  John  Whel- 
den,  Wm.  Elliott,  Neal  Murphy,  Wm.  Cross,  Nat.  Hunt,  Blandermin  Smith, 
George  Burckhartt,  John  C.  Reed,  Capt.  Robert  Scones,  James  Goodring, 
Elijah  Hammett,  John  J.  Turner,  Joseph  Wilcox,  James  Cochran,  Thomas 
Gorham,  Sr.,  T.  R.  C.  Gorham,  Daniel  Hunt,  William  Goggin,  Rueben 
Samuel,  Thomas  J.  Samuel,  John  Head,  Robert  Boucher,  Joseph  M.  Ham- 
mett, Dr.  W.  B.  McLean,  Chas.  McLean,  F.  K.  Collins,  Paul  Christian, 
Sr.,  Jos.  Cockrill  and  Robert  W.  Wells  and  Nathan  Hunt. 

It  will  be  borne  in  mind  that  these  early  settlers  arrived  and  located 
prior  to  the  organization  of  Randolph  County  and  when  we  refer  to  the 
townships  in  this  connection  by  name  we  refer  to  the  four  original  town- 
ships into  which  the  county  was  subdivided  after  its  organization.  Pri- 
marily, Silver  Greek  and  Salt  Spring  townships  embraced  the  entirei 
western  half  of  the  county  and  Prairie  and  Sugar  Creek  townships  the 
eastern  portion  of  the  county.  Many  others  came  before  the  organiza- 
tion of  Randolph  county,  but  the  time  of  their  arrival  cannot  be  definitely 
fixed  at  this  late  date.  These  later  arrivals,  many  of  them,  will  receive 
mention  in  the  history  of  the  several  townships  as  now  organized. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  117 

In  a  recent  history  of  Missouri  written  by  a  college  professor  these 
pioneer  settlers  are  referred  to  by  the  learned  author  as  rude,  uncouth, 
roistering  men  and  not  over  law  abiding.  Evidently  the  author  of  this 
work  belongs  to  a  younger  generation  and  was  not  fortunate  enough 
to  have  become  personally  acquainted  with  any  great  number  of  these 
pioneers.  The  writer  of  this  article  grew  up  from  a  boy  ten  years  of 
age  among  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Clay  County  and  in  the  early  seventies 
made  the  acquaintance  of  many  of  these  old  settlers  of  Randolph  County 
who  were  then  advanced  in  years,  some  of  them  feeble  with  age,  others 
yet  sturdy  oaks  in  their  seventies,  perhaps  older.  The  early  settlers 
of  Clay  County,  like  those  of  Randolph,  were  from  the  same  states 
and  like  to  the  early  settlers  of  Randolph  County  in  every  respect.  As 
a  rule  they  were  not  college  bred,  yet  some  of  them  had  college  diplomas. 
And  on  the  other  hand  some  were  illiterate,  but  not  all.  Prior  to  1840 
Missouri  was  yet  a  young  state  and  much  of  it  was  yet  a  wilderness, 
and  the  class  of  people  who  came  were  as  a  rule  men  of  strong  convic- 
tions and  strong  characters. 

The  very  early  settlers,  those  who  took  up  their  abode  in  Ran- 
dolph County  prior  to  its  organization,  were  supermen.  Before  1820 
no  steamboats  plied  the  Missouri  River  and  previous  to  that  time  and 
long  afterward  the  emigrant  from  east  of  the  Mississippi  came  with 
his  family,  if  he  had  one,  in  a  covered  wagon  or  wagons.  It  was  only 
the  courageous,  industrious,  fearless  man  that  come  to  the  wilderness 
in  those  days.  He  may  have  been  deficient  in  book  learning,  but  he 
had  learned  much  in  the  most  thorough  scht)ol  of  all — the  school  of 
experience.  The  man  who  sought  an  easy,  restful  life,  free  from  cares 
and  dangers,  remained  in  the  state  of  his  birth.  No  drones  crossed 
the  Mississippi  River  into  the  wilderness  in  the  early  days. 

It  was  my  fortune  to  make  the  acquaintance  of  probably  a  dozen 
of  the  very  early  settlers  who  came  to  this  county  before  the  state 
was  admitted  into  the  Union  and  of  many  more  before  Randolph  County 
was  organized.  They  were  not  great  scholars,  many  of  them,  but  as 
a  rule  they  were  men,  courageous,  honest,  energetic,  home  loving  and 
hospitable,  and  many  of  them  were  consistent  church  men.  So  far  as 
natural  ability,  industry,  morality  and  right  living  was  concerned  they 
more  than  averaged  with  the  men  of  Randolph  County  today.  As  a 
rule  their  word  was  as  good  as  their  bond.  In  the  early  days  when 
they  lived  side  by  side,  i.  e.,  within  a  few  miles  of  each  other,  facing: 


118  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

a  common  peril,  and  being  largely  dependent  the  one  upon  the  other, 
it  was  no  uncommon  thing  for  a  neighbor  to  loan  a  neighbor  not  only 
small  sums  of  money,  but  sums  amounting  to  several  hundred  dollars 
and  decline  to  take  a  note  because  his  neighbor's  promise  was  good 
and  his  lender  knew  his  word  would  be  kept. 

Nor  were  those  early  settlers  rude  or  uncouth,  especially  in  the 
company  of  ladies.  They  were  possessed  of  native  dignity,  they  placed 
women  upon  a  pedestal  and  were  gentlemen  in  their  presence  and  true 
men  at  all  other  times.  As  a  matter  of  course  there  were  some,  as 
there  always  are  iri  every  neighborhood  who  didn't  measure  up  to  this 
standard,  but  there  were  as  few  of  their  class  then  as  now.  Men  and 
women  of  today  are  better  educated,  it  is  true,  but  God  makes  men 
and  women  and  endows  them.  The  college  may  polish  and  to  a  degree 
enlighten  and  improve,  but  it  can't  make  nor  unmake  God's  handiwork. 

It  is  not  the  purpose  of  the  writer  to  unduly  extol  these  early 
settlers,  but  to  pay  them  a  just  tribute  only.  It  was  the  writer's  privi- 
lege in  the  early  seventies  to  become  personally  acquainted  with  a  num- 
ber of  these  old  settlers.  Several  of  them  had  already  passed  their 
four  score  mile  post.  Others  were  a  score  or  half  a  score  of  years 
younger  and  many  of  these  younger  ones  became  my  personal  friends. 
A  number  of  the  early  settlers  had  moved  west  and  south  and  of  course 
many  others  had  ended  life's  journey  and  were  sleeping  the  last  sleep 
in  the  church  yards  that  dotted  Randolph  County. 

The  memory  of  men,  however,  such  men  as  were  George  Burck- 
hartt.  Major  Homer,  William  Holman  and  the  older  Taylors,  Samuels, 
Burtons,  McLeans  and  many  other  former  leading  citizens,  does  not 
die  with  them.  There  were  hundreds  yet  living  who  bore  testimony 
to  the  high  character  and  worth  of  these  early  settlers.  What  I  have 
written  concerning  them,  the  ones  that  I  knew,  I  know  to  be  just  and 
true,  and  what  I  have  written  concerning  those  who  had  passed  away 
is  equally  true  because  based  upon  the  testimony  of  many  credible  men. 
The  sons  and  daughters  and  later  descendents  of  these  pioneers  may 
therefore  take  pride  in  the  names  and  achievements  of  their  pioneer 
forefathers,  with  few  exceptions. 

Other  early  settlers  were:  James  Hea;d,  Robert  Wilson,  James 
Wells,  Archibald  Shoemaker,  John  Peeler,  Elisha  McDaniel,  Thomas 
Bradley,  John  Dysart,  Abraham  Goodding,  Nathaniel  Floyd,  David  Floyd, 
William  Drinkard,  John  McCully,  Benjamin  Hardester,  Samuel  McCully, 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  119 

Terry  Bradley,  Thomas  J.  Gorham,  George  Shirley,  Robert  Gee,  Phoebe 
Wheldon,  Gabriel  Johnson,  Abraham  Summers,  George  W.  Green,  Jacob 
Maggard,  Samuel  Eason,  James  Davis,  John  Harvey,  Elijah  Hammett, 
Joseph  Goodding,  Fielding  Cockerill,  Edwin  T.  Hickman,  Nicholas  S.  Dy- 
sart,  Benjamin  F.  Wood,  Hancock  Jackson,  S.  Brockman,  EHas  Fort, 
Aaron  Fray,  John  Wheldon,  John  M.  Patton,  William  Harris,  William 
Patton,  Isaac  Harris,  James  Wells,  Henry  Lassiter,  Mark  Noble,  William 
B.  Tompkins,  John  Garshwiler,  Sandy  Harrison,  Thomas  Adams,  May 
Burton,  James  Burton,  Josiah  Davis,  David  Proffit,  Joseph  Higbee,  Am- 
brose Medley,  Henry  T.  Martin,  John  Loe,  Thoret  Rose,  Charles  Baker, 
William  Baker,  John  Clarkson,  William  Holeman,  John  Bagley,  John  Tay- 
lor, George  Q.  Thomson,  Thomas  Griffin,  Thomas  Pirather,  John  Kirley, 
John  Littrell,  James  Pipes,  James  Vivion,  Wiley  Ferguson,  Robert  Ash, 
Hiram  Summers,  Nicholas  W.  Tuttle,  Noah  Baker,  Richard  Wells,  Phillip 
Dale,  Isaac  Waldon,  Felix  G.  Cockerill  Frederick  Rowland,  James  Howard, 
Rachel  Crawford,  William  H.  Davis,  Isam  Rials,  Anthony  Head,  Jesse 
Jones,  Robert  Cornelius,  John  Biswell,  Luke  Mathis,  William  Robertson, 
William  H.  Brooks,  Adam  Wilson,  Benjamin  Hardin,  William  Blue,  Wyatt 
McFadden,  W.  M.  Dameron,  William  Lockridge,  Gideon  Wright,  John  Ball, 
Thomas  H.  Benton,  John  D.  Reed,  Moses  Kimbrough,  Aaron  Kinbrough, 
James  Emerson,  Edward  Stephenson,  Evan  Wright,  Stephen  Scoby,  James 
Vestals,  John  J.  Rice,  Waddy  T.  Currin,  Derling  Wright,  William  Upton, 
William  Meyers,  Lewis  Collier,  William  B.  Tompkins,  William  Oliver, 
Samuel  Gash,  Abijah  Goodding,  Martin  Fletcher,  Edmund  Chapman, 
John  Thompson,  David  Peeler,  John  Tooley,  Toland  Magoffin,  James  S. 
Ingram,  Adam  Everly,  Uriel  Sebree,  Robert  Payne,  John  Nanson,  Jona- 
than Dale,  Michael  Daly,  Benjamin  Skinner,  William  Cooley,  Henry  Wil- 
kinson, Mark  H.  Kirkpatrick,  John  Bull,  George  Watts,  Justin  Rose,  Noah 
Baker,  Simpson  Foster,  Richard  Goodding,  Andrew  Goodding,  William 
Sears,  George  Dawkins,  Jonathan  Ratliff,  Henry  Schitchfield,  Benjamin 
Hardin,  Liberty  Noble,  Richard  Rout,  E.  D.  Vest,  Henry  Austin,  William 
B.  Means,  Jubal  Hart,  John  Dunn,  William  Lindsey,  Branton  Carton,  Wil- 
liam Ramsey,  Zepheniah  Walden,  Lewis  S.  Jacobs,  William  Cristal,  John 
Collins,  Stanton  Carter,  Charles  Hatfield,  Reynold  Green,  James  Mitchell, 
John  Rowton,  Garland  Crenshaw,  William  Smoot,  Thomas  Phipps,  Joshua 
Phipps,  Owen  Singleton,  Samuel  T.  Crews,  Richard  Routt,  John  A.  Pitts, 
Tilman  W.  Belt,  Joseph  Sharon,  Dabney  Finley,  Aaron  W.  Lane,  Rueben 
Small,  William  Banks,  John  Parker,  Henry  Hines,  Abner  Brasfield,  Lucinda 


120  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Dalton,  Thomas  Partin,  Russell  Shoemaker,  Jesse  Harrison,  John  B.  Samp- 
kins,  William  C.  Dickerson,  John  D.  Bowen,  Andrew  King,  Samuel  Hodge, 
James  Hodge,  Byrd  Pyle,  Bright  Gillstrap,  David  James,  Tucker  W. 
Lewis,  William  Wear,  C.  F.  Burckhartt,  Squire  S.  Winn,  Samuel  Rich- 
mond, John  Kane,  Gabriel  Maupin,  Phillip  B.  Hodgkin,  Michael  Wate, 
Peter  Gulp,  Sydney  J.  Swetnam,  William  Fray,  James  H.  Bean,  Ebenezer 
Enyart,  Edmund  Bartlett,  Nathan  Minter,  James  Hinson,  Major  Wallis, 
Robert  Steele,  Richard  Banter,  James  T.  Haly,  Isham  P.  Embree,  P.  Samuel, 
William  H.  Mansfield,  Lewis  Bumbardner,  Waller  Head,  Edward  R.  Brad- 
ley, Yancy  Gray,  Abner  Vickry,  Waitman  Summers,  William  Eagan, 
Barnaby  Eagan,  Charles  W.  Cooper,  G.  W.  Richey,  Joseph  D.  Rutherford, 
Loverance  Evans,  Clark  Banning,  Levi  Fawks,  James  Fray,  John  Wilks, 
Samuel  Belshe,  Hugh  C.  Dobbins,  Fisher  Rice,  Nathan  Decker,  Leonard 
Dodson,  Silah  Phipps,  Thomas  Tudor,  Thomas  K.  White,  William  W. 
Walker,  Isaac  L.  Yealock,  Walker  Austin,  Daniel  Lay,  John  McDavitt, 
Henry  Smith.  • 


CHAPTER  .X 


ORGANIZATION  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


ORGANIZED  IN  1829 — NAMED  IN  HONOR  OF  JOHN  RANDOLPH  OF  ROANOKE — FIRST 
COUNTY  COURT — COUNTY  DIVIDED  INTO  FOUR  TOWNSHIPS— OFFICERS  AP- 
POINTED— SECOND  SPECIAL  TERM — COUNTY  FINANCES — FIRST  BRIDGES — 
COUNTY  RECORDS— FIRST  CIRCUIT  COURT— FIRST  GRAND  JURY— ATTOR- 
NEYS— SECOND  GRAND  JURY. 

Randolph  County  was  organized  in  1829  and  bears  the  name  of  an 
early  American  orator  and  statesman,  John  Randolph  of  Roanoke,  who  was 
bom  in  Chesterfield  County,  Virginia,  June  2,  1773,  and  died  in  Phila- 
delphia, June  24,  1833.  He  was  educated  at  Princeton  and  Columbia 
colleges.  He  was  elected  a  representative  in  congress  from  Virginia  in 
1799,  and  soon  became  conspicuous.  He  was  described  by  Hildreth  as  "a 
singular  mixture  of  the  aristocrat  and  the  Jacobin."  He  was  re-elected  in 
1801,  and  was  made  chairman  of  a  committee  of  ways  and  means.  In 
1803,  as  chairman  of  a  committee,  he  reported  against  a  memorial  from 
Indiana,  for  permission  to  introduce  slaves  into  the  territory  in  spite 
of  the  prohibition  of  the  ordinance  of  1787,  which  he  pronounced  to 
be  "wisely  calculated  to  promote  the  happiness  and  prosperity  of  the 
northwestern  country." 

In  1804  he  was  chief  manager  in  the  trial  of  Judge  Samuel  Chase, 
impeached  before  the  senate.  In  1806  he  assailed  President  Jefferson 
and  his  supporters  with  great  virulence.  He  attached  Madison's  admin- 
istration, and  opposed  the  declaration  of  war  against  Great  Britain  in 
1812.  His  opposition  caused  his  defeat  at  the  next  election.  He  was 
re-elected  in  1814  and  again  in  1818,  having  declined  to  be  a  candidate 
in   1816.     In  the  congress  of   1819-20  he  opposed  the  Missouri  Com- 


122  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

promise,  stigmatizing  the  northern  members,  by  whose  co-operation  it 
was  carried,  as  "doughfaces,"  an  epithet  adopted  into  the  political  vo- 
cabulary of  the  United  States.  In  1822  and  again  in  1824  he  visited 
England.  From  1825  to  1827  he  was  a  senator  of  the  United  States, 
and  during  that  time  fought  a  duel  with  Henry  Clay.  He  supported 
General  Jackson  for  president  in  1828.  In  1829  he  was  a  member  of 
the  convention  to  revise  the  constitution  of  Virginia,  and  in  1830  was 
appointed  a  minister  to  Russia,  but  soon  after  his  reception  by  the 
Emperor  Nicholas,  he  departed  abruptly  for  England,  where  he  remained 
for  nearly  a  year,  and  returned  home  without  revisiting  Russia.  He 
was  again  elected  to  congress,  but  was  too  ill  to  take  his  seat. 

Exhausted,  with  consumption,  he  died  in  a  hotel  at  Philadelphia, 
whither  he  had  gone  on  his  way  to  take  passage  again  across  the  ocean. 
During  his  life,  his  speeches  were  more  fully  reported  and  more  gen- 
erally read  than  those  of  any  other  member  of  Congress.  He  was  tall 
and  slender,  with  long,  skinney  fingers  which  he  was  in  the  habit  of 
pointing  and  shaking  at  those  against  whom  he  spoke.  His  voice  was 
shrill  and  piping,  but  under  perfect  command,  and  musical  in  its  lower 
tones.  His  invectives,  sarcasm  and  sharp  and  wreckless  wit,  made  him 
a  terror  to  his  opponents  in  the  house.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he 
owned  318  slaves,  whom  by  his  will  he  manumitted,  bequeathing  funds 
for  their  settlement  and  maintenance  in  a  free  state.  His  "Letters  to 
a  Young  Relative"  appeared  in  1834. 

The  first  county  court  that  convened  in  Randolph  County,  was  held 
on  the  2d  day  of  February,  1829.  The  following  is  the  record  and 
proceedings  of  the  first  term  of  the  said  court:        ' 

At  a  county  court  begun  and  held,  for  and  within  the  county  afore- 
said, at  the  house  of  Blandehnin  Smith,  the  place  appointed  by  law 
for  holding  the  courts  of  said  county,  James  Head,  William  Fort,  and 
Joseph  M.  Baker,  Esquires,  produced  from  the  governor  of  the  state 
commissions  as  justices  of  said  court,  who  qualified  on  the  2d  day  of 
February,  in  the  year  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-nine. 
Whereupon  court  was  opened  by  proclamation. 

The  court  appoint  James  Head  president  of  the  court. 

The  court  appoint  Robert  Wilson  clerk  pro  tem  of  this  court. 

Ordered,  That  all  applicants  for  office  file  with  the  clerk  pro  tem. 
their  applications  in  writing. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  123 

The  court  appoints  Robert  Wilson  clerk  of  said  court;  whereupon 
he  entered  into  bonds  with  satisfactory  security,  which  is  received  by 
the  court,  and  ordered  to  be  certified  to  the  governor. 

Ordered,  That  court  adjourn  until  tomorrow  morning  at  ten  o'clock. 

WM.  FORT, 
JOSEPH   M.   BAKER. 

Tuesday  Morning,  February  3d,  1829. 

The  court  met  pursuant  to  adjournment.  Present,  Justices  Head, 
Fort,  and  Baker.  R.  WILSON,  Clerk,  P.  T. 

The  court  recommend  to  his  excellency,  the  governor  of  this  state, 
the  following  named  persons  to  be  appointed  justices  of  the  peace,  viz.: 
Blanderman  Smith,  James  Wells,  and  Archibald  Shoemaker,  for  Salt 
Spring  township;  John  Peeler  and  Elisha  McDaniel,  for  Sugar  Creek 
township;  Thomas  Bradley,  John  Viley,  and  John  Dysart,  for  Silver 
Creek  township,  and  Charles  McLean  for  Pi'airie  township. 

The  court  then  proceeded  to  divide  the  county  into  townships,  as 
follows,  viz. :  The  township  of  Silver  Creek  shall  be  bounded  as  follows : 
Beginning  at  the  southwest  comer  of  Howard  county;  thence  running 
north  with  Randolph  county  line,  to  the  township  line,  between  town- 
ships 53  and  54;  thence  east  with  said  township  line,  to  the  range  line, 
to  the  Howard  county  line;  thence  west  with  said  line  to  the  beginning. 

The  township  of  Prairie  shall  be  bounded  as  follows,  viz.:  Begin- 
ning at  the  Howard  county  line,  where  the  range  line  between  ranges 
14  and  15  intersects  the  same;  thence  north  with  said  range  line,  to  the 
line  dividing  townships  53  and  54;  thence  east  with  said  townships  to 
the  line  dividing  Randolph  and  Ralls  counties;  thence  south  with  said 
county  line,  to  the  Boone  county  line;  thence  west  with  the  line,  divid- 
ing Randolph  and  Boone,  and  Randolph  and  Howard,  to  the  beginning. 

The  township  of  Salt  Spring  shall  be  bounded  as  follows,  viz.: 
Beginning  where  the  township  line,  dividing  townships  53  and  54  on 
the  west;  thence  north  with  said  county  line  to  the  northwest  corner 
of  the  county;  thence  east  with  the  county  line,  to  the  range  line  be- 
tween ranges  14  and  15 ;  thence  south  to  the  comer  of  Silver  Creek 
township;  thence  west  with  said  line  to  the  beginning. 

Ordered,  That  all  territory  lying  north  be  attached  to  and  form  a 
part  of  said  township. 

The  township  of  Sugar  Creek  shall  be  bounded  as  follows,  viz.: 
Beginning  at  the  range  line,  between  ranges  14  and  15,  on  the  north- 


124  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

ern  county  line;  thence  east  to  the  northeast  corner  of  the  county; 
thence  south  with  the  line  dividing  townships  53  and  54;  thence  west 
with  said  line  to  the  corner  of  Silver  Creek  and  Prairie  townships. 

Ordered,  That  all  the  territory  lying  north  of  said  township,  be 
attached   to  and  form  a  part  thereof. 

The  court  appoint  Thomas  J.  Gorham  surveyor  of  the  county  of 
Randolph,  whereupon  he  entered  into  bond  conditioned  as  the  law  directs, 
with  satisfactory  surety. 

The  court  appoint  Terry  Bradley  assessor  for  the  county  of  Ran- 
dolph, for  the  year  1829,  and  until  his  successor  is  duly  elected  and  quali- 
fied. Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  conditioned  as  the  law  directs,  in 
the  penal  sum  of  five  hundred  dollars,  with  Thomas  Bradley  and  Ben- 
jamin Cockerill  his  securities,  which  was  received  by  the  court. 

The  court  appoint  Jacob  Medley  collector  for  the  county  of  Ran- 
dolph, for  the  year  1829.  Whereupon,  he  entered  into  duplicate  bonds, 
conditioned  as  the  law  directs,  in  the  penal  sum  of  two  thousand  dol- 
lars, with  James  Head  and  Terry  Bradley  as  his  securities,  for  the  faith- 
ful performance  of  his  duties  in  relation  to  state  tax,  which  was  received 
by  the  court,  one  of  which  was  ordered  to  be  forwarded  to  the  auditor 
of  public  accounts;  he  also  took  the  oath  prescribed  by  law. 

The  court  appoint  Nathan  Hunt  constable  of  Salt  Spring  township. 
Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  in  the  penal  sum  of  eight  hundred 
dollars,  with  Daniel  Hunt  and  Abraham  Goodding  as  his  securities,  which 
was  received  by  the  court. 

The  court  appoint  Nathan  Floyd  constable  of  Prairie  township. 
Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  in  the  penalty  of  eight  hundred  dollars, 
with  David  Floyd  and  William  Drinkard  as  his  securities,  which  were 
received  by  the  court;  he  then  took  the  oath  prescribed  by  law. 

The  court  appoint  John  McCully  constable  of  Silver  Creek  township. 
Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  in  the  penalty  of  eight  hundred  dollars, 
conditioned  as  the  law  directs,  with  Benjamin  Hardester  and  Samuel 
McCully  as  his  securities,  and  took  the  oath  prescribed  by  law. 

The  court  appoint  Abraham  Goodding  constable  of  Sugar  Creek 
township.  Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  in  the  penalty  of  eight  hun- 
dred dollars,  conditioned  as  the  law  directs,  with  Terry  Bradley  and  Rob- 
ert Sconce  as  his  securities,  and  took  the  oath  prescribed  by  law. 

Ordered,  By  the  court,  that  application  be  made  to  the  clerk  of 
Chariton  county  court,  for  copies  of  such  records  pertaining  to  the  county 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  125 

of  Randolph,  as  may  be  thought  necessary.  The  court  appoint  Robert 
Sconce,  guardian  of  Luzetta  Wheldon,  minor  of  John  Wheldon,  deceased. 
Whereupon,  he  entered  into  bond  conditioned  as  tlie  law  directs,  in  the 
penalty  of  one  thousand  dollars,  with  John  J.  Turner,  and  Thomas  J. 
Gorham  as  his  securities,  which  were  received  by  the  court  as  sufficient. 

Ordered,  that  court  adjourn  until  court  in  course. 

WILLIAM  FORT, 
JOSEPH  M.   BAKER. 

At  a  county  court  begun  and  held  for  and  within  the  county  afore- 
said, by  special  appointment  on  the  first  day  of  March,  1829 ;  present 
William  Fort  and  Joseph  M.  Baker,  justices  of  said  court.  Robert  Wil- 
son, clerk,  and  Hancock  Jackson,  sheriff. 

Ordered,  By  the  court,  that  the  temporary  seat  of  justice  for  said 
county,  be  fixed  at  the  house  of  William  Goggin  in  said  county;  and 
it  is  further  ordered  that  all  courts  of  record,  hereafter  to  be  holden 
in  said  county,  be  held  at  the  house  of  the  said  William  Goggin,  and 
that  a  copy  of  this  order  be  furnished  the  judge  of  the  circuit  court. 

Ordered,  That  court  adjourn  until  court  in  course. 

WILLIAM  FORT, 
JOSEPH  M.  BAKER. 

The  above  constitutes  the  proceedings  of  the  first  and  special  terms 
of  the  county  court.  The  second  regular  term  of  the  court  was  held  on 
the  4th  day  of  May  following,  and  we  note  the  following  proceedings: 

Gabriel  Johnson  was  recommended  for  justice  of  the  peace  for  Sil- 
ver Creek  township,  and  George  Burckhartt  and  Benjamin  Hardin,  for 
Prairie. 

The  following  gentlemen  were  appointed  road  overseers:  Archibald 
Shoemaker,  Blandermin  Smith,  Thomas  Bradley,  John,  Dysart,  James 
Wells,  Henry  Lassiter,  Mark  Noble,  William  B.  Thompkins,  John  Garsh- 
weiler,  John  M.  Patton  and  Josiah  Davis. 

The  first  county  levy  was  made  at  the  June  term,  aid  was  ordered 
to  be  50  per  cent  of  the  state  levy,  and  in  order  to  give  some  idea  of 
the  kind  of  salaries  our  old-time  officers  received,  it  should  be  stated 
that  the  county  assessor,  Terry  Bradley,  "was  allowed  his  account  of 
sixty-one  dollars  and  fifty-six  and  one-fourth  cents,  for  thirty-five  days' 
service,  postage,  stationery,"  etc.  Query — If  such  salaries  as  this  were 
paid  nowadays,  would  not  electioneering  grow  small  by  degrees  and  beau- 
tifully less? 


126  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  collector  made  settlement  of  his  accounts  for  the  county  revenue 
November  3,  1829 ;  it  was  as  follows : 

Resident   list   amounts   to $253.60 

Delinquent  returned  and  allowed   1.25 

Allowed  by  law  for  collecting 20.20 


$21.45 

Leaving  a  balance  of  two  hundred  and  thirty-two  dollars  and  fifteen 
cents  in  his  hands,  together  with  the  sum  of  two  dollars  and  ninety- 
nine  cents,  received  by  him  on  licenses,  which  is  ordered  to  be  paid  to 
the  county  treasurer. 

In  August,  1830,  the  county  court  made  the  following  order: 

The  clerk  is  ordered  to  procure  a  seal  for  the  county  court,  with  the 
emblem  of  the  American  Eagle,  provided  the  same  can  be  had  on  reason- 
able terms. 

Robert  Wilson  was  appointed  commissioner  of  the  county  seat. 
William  Goggin  and  Nancy,  his  wife,  and  Gideon  Wright  and  Rebecca, 
his  wife,  Daniel  Hunt  and  wife,  and  Henry  Winburn  and  wife  all  made 
deeds  without  compensation,  conveying  land  to  the  county  for  the  seat 
of  justice.  Each  gave  twelve  and  a  half  acres,  aggregating  50  acres. 
Reuben  Samuel  was  appointed  superintendent  of  public  buildings. 

The  first  guardian  appointed  by  the  county  court  of  Randolph  county 
was  John  Harvey,  who  was  appointed  guardian  of  Drucilla  Wheldon, 
minor  child  of  John  Wheldon,  deceased.  Davis  and  Currin  were  granted 
the  first  license  to  keep  a  tavern;  their  stand  was  at  the  house  of  Wil- 
liam Goggin.  The  license  for  the  same  cost  them  $10.  John  Taylor 
was  the  second  tavern  keeper. 

The  first  bridge  of  any  importance,  constructed  in  the  county,  was 
built  over  the  east  fork  of  the  Chariton  river,  on  the  first  high  bank 
above  Baker's  ford,  in  1829.  The  citizens  paid  half  of  the  cost  by  sub- 
scription, and  the  county  court  subscribed  the  other  half.  Henry  B. 
Owen  was  the  contractor,  and  received  $1.65  for  building  half  of  the 
bridge.  In  1830  Nicholas  Dysart  was  allowed  the  sum  of  $56  for  assess- 
ing the  county. 

The  early  records  of  the  circuit  court  and  recorder's  office,  espe- 
cially the  record  of  deeds  in  the  latter  office,  were  destroyed  by  fire 
in  1882,  at  the  time  the  court-house  was  burned;  consequently  we  are 
forever  precluded  from  knowing  just  exactly  what  they  contained. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  127 

The  first  circuit  court  within  and  for  the  county  of  Randolph,  was 
held  at  the  residence  of  William  Goggin  in  1829.  The  Hon.  David  Todd, 
of  Boone  county,  was  the  presiding  judge;  Robert  Wilson  was  the  clerk, 
Hancock  Jackson,  sheriff,  and  James  Gordon,  prosecuting  attorney.  The 
following  persons  composed  the  first  grand  jury:  George  Burckhartt, 
foreman;  Peter  Gulp,  Ambrose  Medley,  William  Baker,  Lawrence  Evans, 
Terry  Bradley,  Edwin  T.  Hickman,  Francis  K.  Collins,  Levi  Moore,  Jere- 
miah Summers,  Robert  Boucher,  Richard  Blue,  Henry  Martin,  Thomas 
Kimbrough,  Moses  Kimbrough,  James  Davis,  John  Bagby,  John  Dunn, 
William  Upton,  Robert  Dysart,  John  Martin,  William  Pattin,  Isaac  Harris. 
They  closed  their  labors  on  the  second  day  of  the  term,  having  found 
two  indictments, — one  against  John  Moore  for  "assault  and  battery," 
and  one  against  John  Cooley,  for  resisting  legal  process. 

The  following  attorneys  were  in  attendance  upon  this  court:  Robert 
W.  Wells,  attorney-general;  John  F.  Ryland,  Gen.  John  B.  Clark,  Joseph 
Davis,  Thomas  Reynolds  and  Samuel  Moore.  Each  one  of  the  above 
named  attorneys,  excepting  Moore,  afterwards  occupied  honorable  posi- 
tions in  the  councils  of  the  state.  Wilson  and  Gen.  Clark  were  in  the 
congress  of  the  United  States,  the  former  being  a  senator. 

This  second  grand  jury  was  made  up  of  John  Dysart,  foreman; 
James  Davis,  John  Owens,  David  Turner,  William  Mathis,  Thomas 
Prather,  William  Kerby,  Jacob  Epperly,  Nicholas  Tuttle,  Robert  Elliott, 
George  W.  Green,  Thorett  Rose,  EHsha  McDaniels,  John  D.  Reed,  John 
Gross,  James  Cooley,  John  McCully,  Dr.  William  Fort,  Nathaniel  Floyd, 
David  Floyd. 


CHAPTER  Xf 


EARLY  WARS. 


BEFORE  WAR  OP  1S12— INDIANS  IN  WAR  OF  1812— FORTS  CONSTRUCTED  IN  BOONS- 
LICK  COUNTRY— INDIAN  WARFARE— SETTLERS  KILLED  BY  INDIANS— CAP- 
TAIN COOPER  ASSASSINATED  —  CAPTAIN  SARSHALL  COOPER'S  COMPANY- 
MEXICAN   WAR— COMPANY    ORGANIZED   IN   RANDOLPH    COUNTY— CIVIL  WAR. 

Doubtless  before  the  War  of  1812  began,  the  Missouri  Indians  were  at 
heart  hostile.  They  were  idle,  shiftless  and  treacherous,  from  the  white 
man's  viewpoint.  In  the  presence  of  the  settler,  they  were  apparently 
frank,  accommodating  and  kind.  Yet  they  knew  by  experience  that 
the  white  man  coveted  their  lands,  hence  was  their  enemy,  and  that 
eventually  they  would  be  dispossessed  of  their  hunting  grounds,  all  of 
which  subsequently  came  to  pass. 

Immediately  upon  the  breaking  out  of  hostihties  the  settlers  in  the 
Boonslick  country  began  to  erect  forts  in  every  neighborhood.  Four 
were  constructed  north  of  the  Missouri  river  and  two  south. 

The  largest.  Coopers  fort,  a  stockade  flanked  by  log  houses,  was 
erected  in  the  bottom  south  of  Glasgow  and  near  the  Missouri  river. 
A  common  field  of  250  acres  lying  between  the  fort  and  said  river  was 
worked  by  all  of  its  inhabitants.  Some  twenty  or  more  families  and  a 
number  of  young  men  took  refuge  therein. 

McLeans  fort,  or  Fort  Henpstead,  was  situated  on  a  high  hill  near 
Sulphur  creek,  about  a  mile  west  of  New  Franklin. 

Fort  Kincaid  was  near  the  river  about  a  mile  and  a  half  from  the 
present  site  of  old  Franklin. 

Heads  fort  was  four  miles  from  Rocheport  on  the  "Big  Hill"  near 
the  old  Boonslick  trail.    It  was  the  most  easterly  fort  of  the  settlement. 

South  of  the  river  was  Coles  fort,  a  mile  and  a  half  east  of  the  pres- 
ent site  of  Boonville. 


fyy  4;  i.-5.'H«!'i 


HIGH  SCHOOL,  MOBERLY,  MO. 


WOODLAND  HOSPITAL,  MOBERLY,  MO. 


HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  129 

In  1814,  the  Hannah  Cole  fort  was  erected  on  a  bluff  overlooking 
the  Misosuri  river  not  far  from  Boonville.  The  settlers  of  these  several 
neighborhoods  took  refuge  in  these  forts  and  so  remained  until  peace 
was  declared.  Thus  situated,  co-operation,  so  vitally  necessary  for  the 
safety  of  all,  was  rendered  difficult.  They  made  common  cause  of  their 
danger,  however,  and  stood  together  and  extended  to  each  other  armed 
aid.  And  when  on  one  occasion  the  settlers  in  Cole's  fort,  south  of  the 
river  were  threatened  with  extermination  and  escaped  across  the  river 
to  Fort  Kincaid,  they  found  not  only  a  refuge,  but  an  indefinite  right  of 
hospitality. 

There  were  no  phones  in  those  days  whereby  one  fort  could  com- 
municate with  the  other  in  safety.  When  danger  appeared,  some  daring 
man  or  woman  if  need  be,  must  take  his  life  in  hand  and  bear  the  mes- 
sage in  person. 

Beside  these  imprisoned  women  and  children  and  men  as  well  must 
be  fed  and  the  woods  was  their  larder.  The  hunter  must  go  forth,  other- 
wise a  famine.  The  hunters  went  at  duty's  call,  sometimes  he  did  not 
return,  for  the  Indian  was  a  "bushwhacker,"  the  first  of  the  kind. 

Fair  play  and  no  favors  was  no  part  of  his  war  creed,  nor  is  it  now 
among  so-called  enlightened  nations,  as  it  once  was  in  the  days  of  chiv- 
alry. The  Indian  preferred  to  lie  in  wait  and  slay  his  enemy  from  am- 
bush. The  redmen  were  not  cowards,  but  they  went  on  the  warpath  to 
kill,  not  -to  be  killed.  A  scalp  counted,  whether  obtained  by  a  shot  from 
the  bush  or  in  open  fight,  and  he  preferred  to  shoot  when  concealed; 
it  was  safer.  Indians  were  seldom  reckless  in  battle,  but  if  need  be 
they  knew  no  fear.  Today  full  blood  Indians  who  served  with  the  Amer- 
ican forces  in  France  in  the  late  World  War,  are  wearing  "decorations" 
awarded  them  for  efficient  and  daring  service,  unsurpassed  by  any  sol- 
dier of  any  nationality.  The  Indian  as  a  foe  was  cruel  and  vengeful, 
but  what  about  the  white  race  in  this  last  great  war.  Waged  as  it  was 
by  enlightened  nations  that  claim  to  be  Christian  countries  as  well. 
Every  damnable  device  that  inventor  could  design  or  chemist  discover 
was  used  to  cruelly  and  effectually  destroy  life  and  future  health.  Thou- 
sands of  hopeless  invalids  may  today  be  found  in  the  countries  engaged 
with  lungs  burned  beyond  repair  by  poison  gas,  who  must  suffer  until 
life  ends. 

Thus  it  has  come  to  pass  that  the  savage  Indian  of  more  than  a 
century  ago  has  been  so  far  outdistanced  in  cold-blooded  war  cruelty,  as 
to  make  the  redman  of  that  time  appear  comparatively  humane. 


130  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

During  the  war  of  1812  it  is  definitely  known  that  the  Indians  took 
the  lives  of  ten  of  these  early  settlers,  two  south  of  the  river,  and  eight 
north,  in  the  Boonslick  country. 

In  1812,  two  men  from  Cole's  fort  went  hunting,  Smith  and  Savage, 
and  were  cut  off  by  hostile  Indians.  Savage  escaped,  but  Smith  was 
slain. 

Later,  in  1814,  William  Gregg,  while  feeding  hogs,  was  shot  and 
killed  from  ambush  by  Indians.  This  took  place  above  Arrow  Rock,  and 
both  these  killings  were  south  of  the  Missouri  river. 

Early  in  the  year  1812,  Jonathan  Todd  and  Thomas  Smith,  while 
looking  for  land  upon  which  to  settle  were  set  upon  by  Indians  near  the 
Boone  County  line.  They  bravely  resisted  and  killed  several  Indians,  but 
in  the  end  paid  the  forfeit  with  their  lives. 

In  July,  1812,  a  man  named  Campbell  and  Adam  McCord  went  to 
Campbell's  home  from  Fort  Kincaid  to  do  some  work.  Campbell  was 
killed  from  ambush  and  McCord  escaped. 

Braxton  Cooper,  Jr.,  was  killed  in  September,  1813,  two  miles  north 
of  New  Franklin  while  cutting  logs  to  build  a  house.  He  was  armed 
with  a  rifle  and  a  hunting  knife,  and  fought  to  the  end.  When  his 
body,  lying  face  downwards,  was  found,  his  gun  lay  by  his  side  and  in 
his  clenched  right  hand  was  his  knife  bloody  to  the  hilt.  He  was  a 
young  man  of  superior  physical  strength  and  courage  and  the  trampled 
ground  and  broken  bushes  about  bore  evidence  that  he  had  fought  des- 
perately. He  was  not  scalped  nor  mutilated,  positive  evidence  that  the 
Indians  were  put  to  flight  while  he  was  yet  capable  of  resistance. 

Joseph  Still  and  Stephen  Cooper,  a  youth  of  sixteen,  both  rangers 
from  Fort  Cooper,  while  scouting,  came  in  contact  with  a  band  of  one 
hundred  Indians  twenty  miles  from  the  fort.  The  Indians  barred  the 
way,  so  the  two  rangers  rode  full  speed  at  the  Indians'  line  with  cocked 
rifles.  Both  fired  with  effect.  Cooper  killed  an  Indian  and  Still  shot  and 
wounded  another.  Still  was  shot  from  his  horse  at  the  Indian  line  and 
killed,  while  the  boy  Cooper  went  through  and  escaped  to  the  fort.  This 
was  in  October,  1813. 

About  the  same  time,  October,  1813,  William  McLean  was  killed 
near  Fayette.  He  with  several  other  men  went  to  select  a  piece  of  land 
upon  which  someone  of  them  desired  to  settle.  They  were  attacked  by 
a  large  party  of  Indians  and  McLean  was  shot  in  the  head  and  fell 
dead.    The  others  escaped  to  McLean's  fort. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  131 

A  negro  named  Joe,  belonging  to  Samuel  Brown,  was  killed  by  In- 
dians near  Burckhartt's  farm,  three-quarters  of  a  mile  from  Estill  Sta- 
tion. Several  other  men  belonging  to  Cooper's  fort  also  lost  their  lives 
during  the  war  period,  but  no  record  of  their  names  remain. 

One  of  the  most  lamentable  events  of  this  war  was  the  taking  off 
of  Captain  Sarshall  Cooper  on  the  night  of  AprU  14,  1814.  The  night 
was  exceedingly  dark  and  a  storm  was  raging.  Captain  Cooper  and 
family  lived  in  one  of  the  angles  of  Fort  Cooper.  A  single  warrior  crept 
up  to  the  fort  and  made  a  hole  in  the  clay  between  the  logs,  large  enough 
to  admit  the  muzzle  of  his  gun.  Captain  Cooper  was  sitting  before  the 
fire,  his  youngest  child  in  his  lap,  his  wife  nearby,  was  sewing.  The 
Indian  fired  and  Sarshall  Cooper  fell  lifeless  to  the  floor  in  the  midst 
of  his  family. 

Captain  Cooper  was  a  born  leader.  He  was  five  feet  and  ten  inches 
in  height,  fine  physique,  a  superb  horseman  and  was  cool,  deliberate  and 
courageous.    Cooper  County  was  afterward  named  for  him. 

The  musterroll  of  Captain  Sarshall  Coopers'  company,  dated  April, 
1812,  is  not  without  interest,  and  gives  the  names  of  the  following  offi- 
cers and  men : 

William  McLean,  first  lieutenant;  David  McQuilty,  second  lieutenant; 
John  Monroe,  third  lieutenant;  Ben  Cooper,  ensign;  John  McMurray,  first 
sergeant;  Sam  McMahan,  second  sergeant;  Adam  Woods,  third  ser- 
geant; David  Todd,  fourth  sergeant;  John  Mathews,  fifth  sergeant;  An- 
drew Smith,  corporal;  Thomas  Vaugn,  corporal;  James  McMahan,  cor- 
poral; John  Busby,  corporal;  James  Barnes,  corporal.  Privates  Jesse 
Ashcraft,  Jesse  Cox,  Sam  Perry,  Solomon  Cox,  Henry  Ferrill,  Harmon 
Gregg,  Robert  Cooper,  William  Gregg,  John  Wasson,  Josiah  Higgins,. 
David  Gregg,  Gray  Byrum,  David  Cooper,  Abbott  Hancock,  Williarat 
Thorp,  William  Cooper,  John  Cooper,  Joseph  Cooper,  Stephen  Cooper,. 
William  Read,  Stephen  Turley,  Thomas  McMahan,  James  Anderson,  Wil- 
liam Anderson,  Stephen  Jackson,  John  Hancock,  Robert  Irvin,  Francis 
Cooper,  Benoni  Sappington,  James  Cooley,  Nathan  Teague,  James  Doug- 
lass, John  Sneathan,  William  Cresson,  Joseph  Cooley,  William  McLane, 
James  Turner,  Ervin  M.  McLane,  William  Baxter,  Peter  Creason,  David 
Burns,  Price  Arnold,  John  Smith,  John  Stephenson,  Alfred  Head,  Gilliard 
Roop,  Daniel  Durbin,  James  Cockrill,  Jesse  Tresner,  Mitchell  Poage,  Town- 
send  Brown,  John  Arnold,  Robert  Poage,  Francis  Berry,  Lindsay  Car- 
son, David  Boggs,  Jesse  Richardson,   Robert   Brown,   John  Peak,  John 


132  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Elliot,  Joseph  Beggs,  Andrew  Carson,  John  Colley,  Reuben  Fugitt,  Seibert 
Hubbaid,  John  Berry,  William  Brown,  Francis  Woods,  William  Allen, 
Robert  Wells,  Joseph  Moody,  Joseph  Alexander,  Amos  Barnes,  Daniel 
Hubbard,  Harris  Jamison,  Abraham  Barnes,  William  Ridgeway,  Enoch 
Taylor,  Mathee  Kinkead,  John  Barnes,  Henry  Waedon,  Otto  Ashcraft, 
John  Pursley,  William  Monroe,  Isaac  Thornton,  Stephen  Feils,  Dan  Monroe, 
Giles  Williams,  Henry  Barnes,  William  Savage,  Thomas  Chandler,  John 
Jokley,  Stephen  Cole,  William  Robertson,  William  Bolen,  Mixe  Box,  Sabert 
Scott;  John  Savage,  James  Cole,  Stephen  Cole,  Jr.,  John  Ferrill,  Delaney 
Bolen,  James  Savage,  Joseph  McMahan,  Braxton  Cooper,  Robert  Hancock. 

Every  enlisted  man  furnished  his  own  equipment  and  an  order  was 
promulgated  so  the  "citizen  soldiers  may  not  be  ignorant  of  the  manner 
in  which  the  law  requires  him  to  be  equipped;  he  is  reminded  that  it  is 
his  duty  to  provide  himself  with  a  good  musket,  with  bayonet  and  belt 
or  fusil,  two  spare  flints  and  a  knapsack  pouch  with  a  box  thereon  to 
contain  not  less  than  twenty^four  cartridges,  or  a  good  rifle,  knapsack, 
powder  horn  and  pouch,  with  twenty  balls  and  one-quarter  of  a  pound  of 
powder." 

It  is  not  within  the  provinca  of  this  work  to  go  further  into  the  details 
of  this  war  period.  They  are  intensely  interesting,  however.  At  that 
time  the  now  Randolph  County  was  a  part  of  the  Boonslick  country,  but 
as  yet  no  white  settler  had  reared  his  cabin  within  its  boundaries,  hence 
Randolph  County  had  no  part  in  this  struggle. 

No  doubt  descendants  of  some  of  these  pioneers  who  took  an  active 
part  in  this  struggle  may  be  found  in  Randolph  County  at  this  time,  but 
the  writer  of  this  work  cannot  so  state  positively,  nor  give  names. 

In  July,  1846,  upon  the  call  of  the  president  of  the  United  States,  a 
company  of  men  was  organized  in  Randolph  County  foi  the  Mexican 
War.  The  company  consisted  of  about  100  men,  and  left  Huntsville  on 
the  first  Monday  in  August,  1846.  Before  leaving  the  company  was 
presented  with  a  beautiful  silk  flag,  made  by  the  ladies  of  Randolph 
County.  This  flag  was  carried  by  the  men  through  all  their  long  marches 
and  engagements,  and  when  they  returned  home,  in  November,  1847, 
with  a  list  of  the  names  of  the  men,  stored  away  in  the  courthouse  for 
safe  keeping,  and,  unfortunately,  destroyed  by  fire  when  the  courthouse 
was  burned.  This  list,  being  thus  destroyed,  we  are  unable  to  give  all 
the  names  of  the  men  who  made  up  the  company;  the  list,  however,  is 
as  complete  as  we  can  make  it: 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  133 

Hancock  Jackson,  captain;  Clair  Oxley,  first  lieutenant;  R.  G.  Gil- 
man,  second  lieutenant ;  W.  R.  Samuel,  third  lieutenant ;  William  Ketchum, 
first  sergeant,  died  in  the  army;  W.  L.  Fletcher,  first  sergeant;  L.  W.  T. 
Allin,  second  sergeant,  died  in  the  army ;  Eldridge  Cross,  second  sergeant ; 
Vincent  Barnes,  fourth,  died  in  the  army ;  Isaac  Larrick,  fourth  sergeant, 
died  in  the  army;  Thomas  L.  Gorham,  first  corporal;  Robert  C.  Reed, 
third  corporal;  E.  C.  Montgomery,  fourth  corporal;  R.  M.  Proffit,  first 
bugler;  W.  C.  Ho!man,  second  bugler;  Harrigan  Barnett,  A.  Bradigan, 
blacksmith,  N.  B.  Briswell,  W.  P.  Baker,  John  W.  Burris,  James  H.  Brown, 
Francis  Condon,  George  R.  Caton,  Jeremiah  Clarkston,  Asa  K.  GoUett, 
James  Cole,  Lewis  R.  Collier,  William  Embvee,  0.  N.  P.  Flagett,  David  A., 
Gray,  Samuel  P.  Gray,  William  N.  Gist,  Benjamin  F.  Heaton,  Lewis  Hag- 
gard, James  Heaton,  A.  0.  John,  N.  T.  Johnson,  F.  M.  Morris,  John  F. 
Miller,  Daniel  C.  Moore,  E.  A.  Matney,  James  N.  Marshall,  William  Murley, 
Monroe  Mullion,  John  F.  McDavitt,  died  in  the  army,  0.  P.  Magee,  A. 
McDonald,  John  0.  Oxby,  F.  E.  W.  Patton,  James  Phillips,  M.  H.  Parker, 
E.  W.  Parse!  s,  John  Roberts,  H.  H.  Richardson,  John  W.  Richardson,  W. 
T.  Redd,  W.  G.  Riley,  S.  D.  Richardson,  Martin  Riddle,  P.  M.  Richardson, 
John  W.  Latta,  Harvey  C.  Ray,  James  Ramy,  James  G.  Smith,  W.  R. 
Slater,  Paul  Shirley,  E.  K.  Wilson,  G.  H.  Wilson,  WilHam  H.  Wilson,  0. 
H.  P.  Fizell,  William  Roberts  and  A.  M.  C.  Donald. 

This  company  belonged  to  the  Second  Regiment,  Missouri  Mounted 
Volunteers,  and  was  under  the  command  of  Gen.  Sterling  Price,  and  Lieut.- 
Col.  D.  D.  Mitchell,  two  as  brave  and  gallant  officers  as  ever  commanded 
a  regiment  in  any  war. 

The  men  were  in  two  small  engagements,  one  at  Taos,  and  the  other 
in  the  Moreau  Valley,  and  like  the  American  forces  generally,  came  out 
victorious. 

The  young  men  from  Randolph  County  joined  the  army  away  from 
home.  Their  names  were  Clinton  B.  Samuel  and  his  cousin,  Edmond  T. 
Taylor.  The  former  joined  Capt.  O.  P.  Moss'  company,  Doniphan's  regi- 
ment, and  the  latter  Captain  Barber's  company,  of  Linn  County.  They 
were  true-hearted  and  brave;  one  died  with  the  consumption  (Samuel), 
and  the  other  (Taylor)  died  from  an  attack  of  measles,  and  was  buried 
far  away  from  home  and  friends,  on  the  top  of  a  lonely  mountain  in  New 
Mexico. 

Randolph  County,  as  did  the  state  of  Missouri  generally,  suffered  much 
during  the  Civil  War.    Her  territory  was  nearly  all  the  time  occupied  by 


134  HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

either  one  or  the  other  antagonistic  elements,  and  her  citizens  were  called 
upon  to  contribute  to  the  support  of  first  one  side  and  then  the  other. 

Among  those  who  commanded  companies  which  were  partially  or 
entirely  raised  from  Randolph  County  for  the  southern  army  were  Col. 
H.  T.  Fort,  Col.  John  A.  Poindexter,  Capt.  Frank  Davis,  Capt.  John  W. 
Bagby,  Capt.  Benjamin  E.  Guthrie  and  Col.  C.  J.  Perkins.  Some  of  the 
above  named  officers  were  from  adjoining  counties,  but  recruited  portions 
of  their  companies  from  Randolph  county. 

Among  those  who  raised  companies  for  the  Union  army  were  Capts. 
T.  B.  Reed,  C.  F.  Mayo,  W.  T.  Austin,  N.  S.  Burckhartt,  W.  A.  Skinner, 
M.  S.  Durham  and  Alexander  Denny.  The  number  of  men  entering  each 
army  was  about  the  same — numbering  between  600  and  900. 

During  the  war  a  few  non-combatants  were  killed  in  the  county: 
James  Harris,  Martin  Green,  James  K.  Carter,  Andrew  J.  Herndon,  and 
two  or  three  colored  men  were  shot  to  death  at  their  homes  or  in  the 
county. 


CHAPTER  XII 


PHYSICAL  FEATURES  AND  NATURAL  RESOURCES. 


LOCATION— AREA— GRAND     DIVIDE— RIVERS,     CREEKS     AND     STREAMS— TIMBER- 
COAD — TOPOGRAPHY — SOILS. 


Randolph  County  is  a  north  Missouri  county.  Its  southern  boundary 
is  from  twenty-two  to  twenty-five  miles  north  of  the  Missouri  river  at 
Rocheport  and  at  Boonville.  It  is  approximately  seventy  miles  south 
of  the  Iowa  state  line  and  is  one  of  the  central  counties  from  east  and 
west.  It  contains  307,677  acres.  Randolph  County  is  bounded  on  the 
north  by  Macon  and  Shelby  Counties ;  on  the  east  by  Monroe  and  Audrain ; 
on  the  south  by  Howard  and  Boone  and  on  the  west  by  Chariton  County. 

The  grand  divide  between  the  Mississippi  and  Missouri  rivers,  begin- 
ning in  St.  Charles  County,  runs  northwest  into  Randolph  County,  thence 
turns  north  through  the  counties  of  Macon,  Adair  and  Schuyler  into 
Iowa  and  thence  northwesterly,  parallelling  the  Des  Moines  river  beyond 
its  source,  thence  northwesterly  to  a  point  northwest  of  Big  Stone  Lake, 
where  it  joins  the  continental  divide  running  east  and  west  from  the 
Atlantic  to  the  Pacific,  dividing  the  waters  running  south  from  those 
running  into  the  Hudson  Bay.  About  one-fourth  of  Randolph  County 
is  on  the  east  slope  of  this  divide  and  from  this  part  of  the  county  the 
water  flows  into  the  Mississippi,  and  on  the  other  hand  the  waters  from 
the  west  and  south  side  of  the  divide  flow  into  the  Missouri.  The  towns 
of  Clark,  Renick,  Moberly,  Cairo  and  Jacksonville  are  situated  on  this 
divide,  Moberly  being  the  highest  point  between  Hannibal  and  Bruns- 
wick. This  divide  is  a  prairie  from  the  eastern  part  of  Montgomery 
County  throughout  its  length  and  is  of  unequal  width,  varying  from  one 
to  five  or  six  miles,  and  was  known  in  the  early  days  as  the  Grand  Prairie. 


136  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  slopes  of  this  divide  to  the  east  are  gentle,  but  as  the  smaller 
streams  come  together  and  form  larger  ones,  the  land  along  the  water 
courses  that  flow  from  these  slopes  grow  more  undulating  and  hilly  along 
the  streams.  From  the  west  and  southwest  side  of  the  divide  flow  the 
Perche,  Moniteau,  Silver  Creek,  Sweet  Springs,  Sugar  Creek  and  Locust 
Creek  and  other  smaller  streams.  All  of  these  streams,  except  the  Perche 
and  Moniteau,  which  flow  south  directly  to  the  Missouri  river,  empty  into 
the  east  fork  of  the  Chariton  river.  The  eastern  fork  of  the  Chariton  has 
its  source  in  north  Missouri  and  enters  Randolph  County  from  the  north, 
about  the  center  of  the  county,  flows  thence  southwest  until  it  empties  into 
the  Chariton  river  a  few  miles  above  the  mouth  of  that  stream  west  of 
Glasgow.  Six  miles  east  of  the  western  line  of  the  county  the  middle 
fork  of  the  Chariton  enters  the  county,  flows  south  by  Thomas  Hill  in 
Chariton  township,  thence  southwest  into  Chariton  County,  passing  Salis- 
bury east  of  that  town  and  forms  a  junction  with  east  fork  a  few  miles 
north  of  Forest  Green,  and  the  streams  so  combined  flow  into  the  Chari- 
ton as  we  have  seen.  From  the  southeast  corner  of  the  county  west, 
the  land  slopes  gently  to  the  south  and  west  for  several  miles,  becom- 
ing broken  and  hilly  along  the  Perche  and  Moniteau  for  a  few  miles  north 
of  the  county  line.  An  arm  of  the  grand  prairie  stretches  out  to  the  south- 
west from  a  point  two  miles  south  of  Moberly  for  several  miles,  extend- 
ing to  within  a  mile  of  Higbee  when  it  becomes  wooded,  and  thence  ex- 
tends into  the  northern  part  of  Howard  County.  From  this  divide  the 
waters  flow  directly  south  from  the  south  side,  and  into  Silver  Creek  and 
Sweet  Spring  from  the  northern  side.  The  land  situated  on  this  divide  is 
first  class  farming  and  grazing  land.  The  western  part  of  the  county  was 
mostly  timber  land,  interspersed,  however,  with  rich  prairie,  and  is  of 
superior  productive  qualities.  The  timber  was  principally  elm,  shell-bark 
hickory,  linden  and  burr,  swamp,  red,  white  and  black  oak,  sycamore  and 
sugar  maple.  There  are  some  large  bodies  of  very  rich  land  in  different 
portions  of  the  county.  The  bottoms  of  t>ie  east  and  middle  forks  of  the 
Chariton  and  Sweet  Spring  creeks  are  very  flat,  but  have  generally  been 
sufl[iciently  drained  to  be  cultivated,  and  are  very  productive. 

There  are  several  prairies  in  the  county  which  contain  very  superior 
land  for  agricultural  purposes.  The  creek  bottoms  are  wonderfully  rich, 
and  where  not  too  flat,  or  being  flat  have  been  drained,  they  produce 
remarkable  crops  of  the  cereals  and  grasses.  About  one-half  of  the  coun- 
try is  prairie. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  137 

Practically  all  of  Randolph  County  rests  upon  coal  beds  of  varying 
thickness  lying  in  strata  at  different  depths. 

From  the  edge  of  the  prairie  that  crown  the  grand  divide,  westward 
a  vein  of  coal  from  three  and  a  half  to  four  feet  in  thickness  underlies 
the  county  practically  to  its  western  border.  From  Jacksonville  west 
these  coal  measures  extend  to  and  beyond  the  county  limits.  In  the  south- 
western comer  they  may  be  somewhat  curtailed.  Coal  mines  have  been 
opened  and  successfully  operated  at  and  south  of  Renick,  at  and  on  all 
sides  of  Higbee,  and  west  thereof  to  Yates.  Also  at  and  around  Hunts- 
ville  to  within  a  mile  of  the  machine  shops  at  Moberly  and  west  of  Jack- 
sonville. This  great  coal  field  underlies  all  of  the  rough  timbered  lands, 
valuable  now  for  grazing  purposes,  but  vastly  more  valuable  by  reason 
of  their  mineral  wealth,  when  transportation  for  the  coal  that  underlies 
them  can  be  had.  This  coal  is  a  soft,  bituminous  coal  and  unexcelled  for 
steam  purposes.  As  yet  only  a  few  hundred  acres  of  this  great  coal  field 
has  been  mined  and  this  vast  wealth  lies  safely  stored  underground 
to  enrich  a  future  generation. 

The  eastern  half  of  the  county,  generally  speaking,  is  what  we  know 
as  the  Putnam  silt  loam  or  level  prairie,  although,  of  course,  this  is  cut 
into  by  streams  in  many  places  and  timber  land  results.  This  timber  land 
is  mostly  what  we  know  as  the  Lindley  loam.  This  soil  is  found  princi- 
pally, however,  in  the  belt  running  north  and  southwest  of  Moberly,  prac- 
tically across  the  county  and  five  to  eight  miles  wide. 

West  of  Huntsville  the  land  is  mainly  what  we  know  as  the  Shelby 
loam  in  the  northern  two-thirds  of  the  county,  while  in  the  southwest 
corner  there  is  some  soil  that  is  classed  as  the  Marshall  silt  loam.  This 
is  the  best  land  in  the  county  outside  of  the  bottoms.  The  Lindley  loam 
is  commonly  known  as  the  white  oak  ridge  land  and  is  best  adapted  to 
grass  and  timber.  There  are,  of  course,  many  intermediate  types  in  the 
county,  but  these  represent  the  principal  soils. 


CHAPTER  XIII 


TOWNSHIP  ORGANIZATION. 


FOUR  ORIGINAL  TOWNSHIPS — LATER  TOWNSHIPS — ORIGIN  OP  COUNTY  SYSTEM — 
BEGINNING  OF  TOWNSHIP  SYSTEM — EARLY  METHODS  OF  TAKING  UP  GOV- 
ERNMENT LAND — PRESENT  SYSTEM  OF  LAND  SURVEYS — CONGRESSIONAL 
TOWNSHIP— MARKINGS. 

Randolph  County  was  originally  divided  into  four  townships:  Silver 
Creek,  Prairie,  Salt  River  and  Sugar  Creek.  The  townships  of  Chariton, 
Clifton,  Salt  Spring,  Jackson,  Cairo,  Union  and  Moniteau  have  since  been 
added,  making  eleven  municipal  townships.  Prairie  is  the  largest,  and 
occupies  the  southeastern  portion  of  the  county.  Jackson  and  Union  are 
the  smallest. 

We  deem  it  proper  here  to  give  some  explanations  of  the  county  and 
township  systems  and  government  surveys,  as  much  depends  in  business 
and  civil  transactions  upon  county  limits  and  county  organizations. 

"The  county  system  originated  with  Virginia,  whose  early  settlers 
soon  became  large  landed  proprietors,  aristocratic  in  feeling,  living  apart 
in  almost  baronial  magnificence,  on  their  own  estates,  and  owning  the 
laboring  part  of  the  population.  Thus  the  materials  for  a  town  were  not 
at  hand,  the  voters  beng  thinly  distributed  over  a  great  area. 

"The  county  organization,  where  a  few  influential  men  managed  the 
wholesale  business  of  a  community,  retaining  their  places  almost  at  their 
pleasure,  scarcely  responsible  at  all,  except  in  name,  and  permitted  to  con- 
duct the  county  concerns  as  their  ideas  or  wishes  might  direct,  was  more- 
over consonant  with  their  recollections  or  traditions  of  the  judicial  and 
social  dignities  of  the  landed  aristocracy  of  England,  in  descent  from  whom 
the  Virginia  gentlemen  felt  so  much  pride.     In  1834  eight  counties  were 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  139 

organized  in  Virginia,  and  the  system  extending  throughout  the  State, 
spread  into  all  the  Southern  States  and  some  of  the  Northern  States; 
unless  we  except  the  nearly  similar  division  into  'districts'  in  South  Caro- 
lina, and  that  into  'parishes'  in  Louisiana,  from  the  French  laws. 

"Illinois,  which,  with  its  vast  additional  territory,  became  a  county  of 
Virginia,  on  its  conquest  by  Gen.  George  Rogers  Clark,  retained  the  county 
organization,  which  was  formerly  extended  over  the  State  by  the  constitu- 
tion of  1818.  and  continued  in  exclusive  use  until  the  constitution  of  1848. 
Under  this  system,  as  in  other  States  adopting  it,  much  local  business 
was  transacted  by  the  commissioners  in  each  county,  who  constituted  a 
county  court,  with  quarterly  sessions. 

"During  the  period  ending  with  the  constitution  of  1847,  a  large  por- 
tion of  the  State  had  become  filled  up  with  a  population  of  New  England 
birth  or  character,  daily  growing  more  and  more  compact  and  dissatisfied 
with  the  comparatively  arbitrary  and  inefficient  county  system.  It  was 
maintained  by  the  people  that  the  heavily  populated  districts  would  always 
control  the  election  of  the  commissioners  to  the  disadvantage  of  the  more 
thinly  populated  sections — in  short,  that  under  that  system  'equal  and 
exact  justice'  to  all  parts  of  the  county  could  not  be  secured. 

"The  township  system  had  its  origin  in  Massachusetts,  and  dates  back 
to  1635. 

"The  first  legal  enactment  concerning  the  system  provided  that, 
whereas,  'particular  townships  have  many  things  which  concern  only  them- 
selves and  the  ordering  of  their  own  affairs,  and  disposing  of  business  in 
their  own  town,'  therefore  the  'freemen  of  every  township,  or  a  majority 
part  of  them,  shall  only  have  power  to  dispose  of  their  own  lands  and 
woods,  with  all  the  appurtenances  of  said  town,  to  grant  lots,  and  to  make 
such  orders  as  may  concern  the  well  ordering  of  their  own  towns,  not 
repugnant  to  the  laws  and  orders  established  by  the  general  court.' 

"They  might  also,"  says  Mr.  Haines,  "impose  fines  of  not  more  than 
twenty  shillings,  and  'choose  their  own  particular  officers,  as  constables, 
surveyors  for  the  highway,  and  the  like.' 

"Evidently  this  enactment  relieved  the  general  court  of  a  mass  of 
municipal  details  without  any  danger  to  the  power  of  that  body  in  con- 
trolling general  measures  of  public  policy. 

"Probably,  also,  a  demand  from  the  freemen  of  the  towns  was  felt 
for  the  control  of  their  own  home  concerns. 


140  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

"The  New  England  colonies  were  first  governed  by  a  general  court 
or  Legislature,  composed  of  a  Governor  and  a  small  council,  which  court 
consisted  of  the  most  influential  inhabitants,  and  possessed  and  exercised 
both  legislative  and  judicial  powers,  which  Avere  limited  only  by  the  wis- 
dom of  the  holders. 

"They  made  laws,  ordered  their  execution  by  officers,  tried  and  de- 
cided civil  and  criminal  causes,  enacted  all  manner  of  municipal  regulations, 
and,  in  fact,  did  all  the  pubhc  business  of  the  colony." 

Similar  provisions  for  the  incorporation  of  towns  were  made  in  the 
first  constitution  in  Connecticut,  adopted  in  1639,  and  the  plan  of  town- 
ship organization,  as  experience  proved  its  remarkable  economy,  efficiency 
and  adaptation  to  Ihe  requirements  of  a  free  and  intelligent  people,  became 
universal  throughout  New  England,  and  went  westward  with  the  immi- 
grants from  New  England,  into  New  York,  Ohio,  and  other  Western  States. 

Thus  we  find  that  the  valuable  system  of  county,  township  and  town 
organizations  had  been  thoroughly  tried  and  proven  long  before  there  was 
need  of  adopting  it  in  Missouri,  or  any  of  the  broad  region  west  of  the 
Mississippi  River.  But  as  the  new  country  began  to  be  opened,  and  as 
Eastern  people  began  to  move  westward  across  the  mighty  river,  and 
formed  thick  settlements  along  its  western  bank,  the  Territory  and  State, 
and  county  and  township  organizations  soon  followed  in  quick  succession, 
and  those  different  systems  became  more  or  less  improved,  according  as 
deemed  necessary  by  the  experience  and  judgment  and  demands  of  the 
people,  until  they  have  arrived  at  the  present  stage  of  advancement  and 
efficiency.  In  the  settlement  of  the  Terirtory  of  Missouri,  the  legislature 
began  by  organizing  counties  on  the  Mississippi  River.  As  each  new 
county  was  formed,  it  was  made  to  include  under  legal  jurisdiction  all  the 
country  bordering  west  of  it,  and  required  to  grant  to  the  actual  settlers 
electoral  privileges  and  an  equal  share  of  the  county  government  with 
those  who  properly  lived  in  the  geographical  limits  of  the  county. 

The  counties  first  organized  along  the  eastern  borders  of  the  State 
were  given  for  a  short  time  jurisdiction  over  the  lands  and  settlements 
adjoining  each  on  the  west,  until  these  localities  became  sufficiently  set- 
tled to  support  organizations  of  their  own. 

"Previous  to  the  formation  of  our  present  government,  the  eastern 
portion  of  North  America  consisted  of  a  number  of  British  colonies,  the 
territory  of  which  was  granted  in  large  tracts  to  British  noblemen.  By 
treaty  of  1783,  these  grants  were  acknowledged  as  valid  by  the  colonies. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  141 

After  the  Revolutionary  War,  when  these  colonies  were  acknowledged 
independent  States,  all  public  domain  within  their  boundaries  was  acknowl- 
edged to  be  the  property  of  the  colony  within  the  bounds  of  which  said 
domain  was  situated. 

"Virginia  claimed  all  the  northwestern  territory,  including  what  is 
now  known  as  Wisconsin,  Michigan,  Ohio,  Kentucky,  Indiana  and  Illinois. 
After  a  meeting  of  the  representatives  of  the  various  States  to  form  a 
Union,  Virginia  ceded  the  northwest  territory  to  the  United  States  govern- 
ment. This  took  place  in  1784;  then  all  this  northwest  territory  became 
government  land.  It  comprised  all  south  of  the  lakes  and  east  of  the 
Mississippi  river  and  north  and  west  of  the  States  having  definite  boundary 
lines.  This  territory  had  been  known  as  New  France,  and  had  been  ceded 
by  France  to  England  in  1768.  In  the  year  1803,  Napoleon  Bonaparte 
sold  to  the  United  States  all  territory  west  of  the  Mississippi  River  and 
north  of  Mexico,  extending  to  the  Rocky  mountains. 

"While  the  public  domain  was  the  property  of  the  colonies,  it  was 
disposed  of  as  follows:  Each  individual  caused  the  tract  he  desired  to 
purchase  to  be  surveyed  and  platted.  A  copy  of  the  survey  was  then  filed 
with  the  registrar  of  lands,  when,  by  paying  into  the  State  or  Colonial 
treasury  an  agreed  price,  the  purchaser  received  a  patent  for  the  land. 
This  method  of  disposing  of  public  lands  made  law  suits  numerous,  owing 
to  different  surveys  often  including  the  same  ground.  To  avoid  the  diffi- 
culties and  effect  a  general  measurement  of  the  territories,  the  Unitea 
States  adopted  the  present  mode  or  system  of  land  surveys,  a  description 
of  which  we  give  as  follows: 

"In  an  unsurveyed  region,  a  point  of  marked  and  changeless  topo- 
graphical features  is  selected  as  an  initial  point.  The  exact  latitude  and 
longitude  of  this  point  is  ascertained  by  astronomical  observation,  and  a 
suitable  monument  of  iron  or  stone,  to  perpetuate  the  position,  is  thus 
reared.  Through  this  point  a  true  north  and  south  line  is  run,  which  is 
called  a  principal  meridian.  This  principal  meridian  may  be  extended 
north  and  south  any  desired  distance.  Along  this  line  are  placed,  at  dis- 
tances of  one-half  mile  from  each  other,  posts  of  wood  or  stone  or  mounds 
of  earth.  These  posts  are  said  to  establish  the  line,  and  are  called  section 
and  quarter-section  posts.  Principal  meridians  are  numbered  in  the  order 
in  which  they  are  established.  Through  the  same  initial  point  from  which 
the  principal  meridian  was  surveyed,  another  line  is  now  run  and  estab- 
lished by  mile  and  half-mile  posts,  as  before,  in  a  true  east  and  west 


142  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

direction.  This  line  is  called  the  base  line,  and  like  the  principal  meridian, 
may  be  extended  indefinitely  in  either  direction.  These  lines  form  the 
basis  of  the  survey  of  the  country  into  townships  and  ranges.  Township 
lines  extend  east  and  west,  parallel  with  the  base  line,  at  distances  of  six 
miles  from  the  base  line  and  from  each  other,  dividing  the  country  into 
strips  six  miles  wide,  which  strips  are  called  townships.  Range  lines  run 
north  and  south,  parallel  to  the  principal  meridian,  dividing  the  country 
into  strips  six  miles  wide,  which  strips  are  called  ranges.  Township  strips 
are  numbered  from  the  base  line,  and  range  strips  are  numbered  from  the 
principal  meridian.  Townships  lying  north  of  the  base  line  are  'townships 
north';  those  on  the  south  are  'townships  south.'  The  strip  lying  next 
the  base  line  is  township  one,  the  next  one  to  that,  two,  and  so  on.  The 
range  strips  are  numbered  in  the  same  manner,  counting  from  the  principal 
meridian  east  or  west,  as  the  case  may  be. 

"The  township  and  range  lines  thus  divide  the  country  into  six-mile 
squares.  Each  of  these  squares  is  called  a  congressional  township.  All 
north  and  south  lines  north  of  the  equator  approach  each  other  as  they 
extend  north,  finally  meeting  at  the  north  pole ;  therefore  north  and  south 
lines  are  not  literally  parallel.  The  east  and  west  boundary  lines  of  any 
range  being  six  miles  apart  in  the  latitude  of  Missouri  and  Kansas,  would, 
in  thirty  miles,  approach  each  other  at  2.9  chains,  or  190  feet.  If,  there- 
fore, the  width  of  the  range  when  started  from  the  base  line  is  made 
exactly  six  miles,  it  would  be  2.9  chains  too  narrow  at  the  distance  of 
thirty  miles,  or  five  townships  north.  To  correct  the  width  of  ranges  and 
keep  them  to  the  proper  width,  the  range  lines  are  not  surveyed  in  a  con- 
tinuous straight  line,  like  the  principal  meridian,  entirely  across  the  State, 
but  only  across  a  limited  number  of  townships,  usually  five,  where  the 
width  of  the  range  is  corrected  by  beginning  a  new  line  on  the  side  of  the 
range  most  distant  from  the  principal  meridian,  at  such  a  point  as  will 
make  the  range  its  correct  width.  All  range  lines  are  corrected  in  the 
same  manner.  The  east  and  west  township  lines  on  which  these  correc- 
tions are  made  are  called  correction  lines,  or  standard  parallels.  The  sur- 
veys of  the  State  of  Missouri  were  made  from  the  fifth  principal  meridian, 
which  runs  throughout  the  State,  and  its  ranges  are  numbered  from  it. 
The  State  of  Kansas  is  surveyed  and  numbered  from  the  sixth.  Con- 
gressional townships  are  divided  into  thirty-six  square  miles,  called  sec- 
tions, and  are  known  by  numbers  according  to  their  position. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  143 

"Sections  are  divided  into  quarters,  eighths  and  sixteenths,  and  are 
described  by  their  position  in  the  section.  The  full  secton  contains  640 
acres,  the  quarter  160,  the  eighth  80,  and  the  sixteenth  40. 

"Congressional  townships,  as  we  have  seen,  are  six-mile  squares  of 
land,  made  by  the  township  and  range  lines,  while  civil  or  municipal  town- 
ships are  civil  divisions,  made  for  purposes  of  government,  the  one  hav- 
ing no  reference  to  the  other,  though  similar  in  name.  On  the  county  map 
we  see  both  kinds  of  townships — the  congressional  usually  designated  by 
numbers  and  in  squares ;  the  municipal  or  civil  township  by  name  and  in 
various  forms. 

"By  the  measurement  thus  made  by  the  government  the  courses  and 
distances  are  defined  between  any  two  points.  St.  Louis  is  in  township  44 
north,  range  8  east,  and  Independence  is  in  township  49  north,  range  32 
west ;  how  far,  then,  are  Kansas  City  and  St.  Louis  apart  on  a  direct  line  ? 
St.  Louis  is  40  townships  east — 240  miles — and  5  townships  south — 30 
miles ;  the  base  and  perpendicular  of  a  right-angled  triangle,  the  hypoth- 
enuse  being  the  required  distance." 

The  "township,"  as  the  term  is  used  in  common  phraseology,  in  many 
instances  is  widely  distinguished  from  that  of  "town,"  though  many  per- 
sons persist  in  confounding  the  two.  "In  the  United  States  many  of  the 
States  are  divided  into  townships  of  five,  six,  seven,  or  perhaps  ten  miles 
square,  and  the  inhabitants  of  such  townships  are  vested  with  certain 
powers  for  regulating  their  own  affairs,  such  as  repairing  roads  and  pro- 
viding for  the  poor.  The .  township  is  subordinate  to  the  county."  A 
"town"  is  simply,  a  collection  of  houses,  either  large  or  small,  and  opposed 
to  "country." 

The  most  important  features  connected  with  this  system  of  town- 
ship surveys  should  be  thoroughly  understood  by  every  intelligent  farmer 
and  business  man;  still  there  are  some  points  connected  with  the  under- 
standing of  it,  which  need  close  and  careful  attention.  The  law  which 
established  this  system  required  that  the  north  and  south  lines  should 
correspond  exactly  with  the  meridian  passing  through  that  point;  also, 
that  each  township  should  be  six  miles  square.  To  do  this  would  be  an 
utter  impossibility,  since  the  figure  of  the  earth  causes  the  meridians  to 
converge  toward  the  pole,  making  the  north  line  to  each  township  shorter 
than  the  south  line  of  the  same  township.  To  obviate  the  errors  which 
are,  on  this  account,  constantly  occurring,  correction  lines  are  established. 
They  are  parallels  bounding  a  line  of  townships  on  the  north,  when  lying 


144  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

north  of  the  principal  base  from  which  the  surveys,  as  they  are  continued, 
are  laid  out  anew ;  the  range  lines  again  starting  at  correct  distances  from 
the  principal  meridian.  In  Michigan  these  correction  lines  are  repeated 
at  the  end  of  every  tenth  township,  but  in  Oregon  they  have  been  repeated 
with  every  fifth  township.  The  instructions  to  the  surveyors  have  been 
that  each  range  of  townships  should  be  made  as  much  over  six  miles  in 
width  where  it  closes  on  to  the  next  correction  line  north ;  and  it  is  further 
provided  that  in  all  cases  where  the  exterior  lines  of  the  townships  shall 
exceed,  or  shall  not  extend,  six  miles,  the  excess  of  deficiency  shall  be 
specially  noted,  or  added  to  or  deducted  from  the  western  or  northern 
sections  or  half  sections  in  such  township,  according  as  the  error  may  be 
in  running  the  lines  from  east  to  west,  or  from  south  to  north.  In  order 
to  throw  the  excess  of  deficiencies  on  the  north  and  on  the  west  sides  of 
the  township,  it  is  necessary  to  survey  the  section  lines  from  south  to 
north,  on  a  true  meridian,  leaving  the  result  in  the  north  line  of  the  town- 
ship to  be  governed  by  the  convexity  of  the  earth  and  the  convergency  of 
the  meridians. 

Navigable  rivers,  lakes  and  islands  are  "meandered"  or  surveyed  by 
the  compass  and  chain  along  the  banks.  "The  instruments  employed  on 
these  surveys,  besides  the  solar  compass,  are  a  surveying  chain  33  feet 
long,  of  50  links,  and  another  of  smaller  wire,  as  a  standard  to  be  used 
for  correcting  the  former  as  often  at  least  as  every  other  day,  also  11 
tally  pins,  made  of  steel,  telescope,  targets,  tape-measure  and  tools  for 
marking  the  lines  upon  trees  or  stones.  In  surveying  through  woods,  trees 
intercepted  by  the  line  are  marked  with  two  chips  or  notches,  one  on  each 
side;  these  are  called  sight  or  line  trees.  Sometimes  other  trees  in  the 
vicinity  are  blazed  on  two  sides  quartering  toward  the  line;  but  if  some 
distance  from  the  line,  the  two  blazes  should  be  near  together  on  the  side 
facing  the  line.  These  are  found  to  be  permanent  marks,  not  wholly  recog- 
nizable for  many  years,  but  carrying  with  them  their  old  age  by  the  rings 
of  growth  around  the  blaze,  which  may  at  any  subsequent  time  be  cut  out 
and  counted  as  years ;  and  the  same  are  recognized  in  courts  of  law  as  evi- 
dence of  the  date  of  survey.  They  cannot  be  obliterated  by  cutting  down 
the  trees  or  otherwise  without  leaving  evidence  of  the  act.  Corners  are 
marked  upon  trees  if  found  at  the  right  spot,  or  else  upon  posts  set  in  the 
ground,  and  sometimes  at  monument  of  stones  is  used  for  a  township 
comer,  and  a  single  stone  for  a  section  corner;  mounds  of  earth  are  made 
when  there  are  no  stones  nor  timber.     The  comers  of  the  four  adjacent 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  145 

sections  are  designated  by  distinct  marks  cut  into  a  tree,  one  in  each  sec- 
tion. These  trees,  facing  the  corner,  are  plainly  marked  with  the  letters 
B.  T.  (bearing  tree)  cut  into  the  wood.  Notches  cut  upon  the  corner  posts 
or  trees  indicate  the  number  of  miles  to  the  outlines  of  the  township,  or, 
if  on  the  boundaries  of  the  township,  to  the  township  corners. 


CHAPTER  XIV 


TOWNSHIPS. 


CAIRO    TOWNSHIP — CAIRO   VILLAGE — CLIFTON   TOWNSHIP — CLIFTON    HILL — CHAR- 
ITON TOWNSHIP— DARKBVILLB. 


CAIRO  TOWNSHIP. 

Cairo  township  lies  in  the  second  tier  of  townships  from  the  northern 
boundary  of  Randolph,  and  in  the  central  northeast  part  of  the  county. 
It  contains  an  area  of  21,920  acres,  or  a  fraction  over  34  square  miles. 
The  grand  divide  runs  in  a  northwesterly  direction  through  it,  separating 
it  into  two  nearly  equal  parts.  Its  territory  was  formerly  a  part  of  Sugar 
Creek  township. 

The  soil  is  a  rich  black  loam,  overlaying  a  substratum  of  stiff  clay 
that,  when  exposed  to  the  influences  of  rain  and  sunshine,  snow  and  frost, 
not  only  becomes  friable  and  arable,  but  imparts  a  peculiar  productive 
energy  to  the  soil  and  is  admirably  adapted  to  the  cultivation  of  certain 
crops.  Hence,  the  meadows  and  grass  fields  that  have  been  deeply  stirred 
are  among  the  best  in  the  state,  and  the  township  is  noted  for  the  rich 
and  nutritive  quality  of  its  grasses.  The  cereals,  also,  are  cultivated  with 
success.     About  two-thirds  of  the  territory  is  a  high  rolling  prairie. 

The  Wabash  Railroad  follows  the  divide  and  runs  through  the  town- 
ship; even  the  farmers  who  reside  in  the  most  remote  parts  of  it  are  not 
more  than  six  miles  from  a  depot. 

The  East  fork  of  Chariton  River  and  Walnut  Creek  on  the  west  side, 
and  Mud  Creek,  Elk  fork  and  Flat  Creek  on  the  east,  afford  plenty  and 
never  failing  water  for  all  the  operations  of  the  farm. 

Live  stock  is  raised  extensively  and  the  amount  shipped  to  markets  of 


HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY  147 

cattle,  sheep,  hogs,  horses  and  mules,  is  very  large,  returning'  a  handsome 
income  to  the  farmers. 

The  average  yield  of  farm  products  per  acre  is  as  follows:  Corn,  30 
bushels  average,  extra,  60  bushels;  oats,  35  bushels  average,  extra,  50 
bushels;  hay,  one  and  a  half  tons. 

Among  the  early  settlers  in  Cairo  township  were  Leonard  Dodson, 
from  Kentucky;  Andrew  Goodding,  from  Kentucky;  Samuel  Martin,  from 
Kentucky;  Col.  Robert  Boucher,  from  Kentucky;  Isaac  Baker,  from  Ken- 
tucky; Benj.  Huntsman,  from  Kentucky;  Daniel  McKinney,  from  Ken- 
tucky; James  Cochran,  from  Kentucky;  William  King,  from  Kentucky; 
James  T.  Boney,  from  North  Carolina;  Benjamin  Dameron,  from  North 
Carolina;  W.  S.  Dameron,  from  North  Carolina;  Judge  Joseph  Goodding, 
from  Kentucky. 

Judge  Joseph  Goodding  is  said  to  have  been  the  first  settler  in  the 
township.  He  emigrated  to  Howard  County,  Mo.,  from  Kentucky,  in 
1818,  and  in  1823  located  in  Cairo  township.  He  was  a  prominent  citizen, 
and  filled  the  office  of  county  judge  three  or  four  terms. 

W.  S.  Dameron  came  to  the  township  in  1841,  from  Huntsville,  Mo., 
and  has  lived  in  Randolph  County  52  years.  He  was  born  in  Nirth 
Carolina,  October  29,  1824. 

Cairo  was  located  in  1860,  on  the  North  division  of  the  Wabash,  St. 
Louis  and  Pacific  Railway,  eight  miles  from  Huntsville,  and  seven  miles 
north  of  Moberly,  and  152  miles  northwest  of  St.  Louis.  The  town  site 
originally  comprised  40  acres,  owned  by  W.  S.  Dameron,  who  donated  five 
acres  for  depot  purposes.  The  remaining  35  acres  were  laid  out  in  lots. 
The  new  town  was  at  first  called  Fairview,  but  there  being  another  town 
of  the  same  name,  it  was  changed  to  Cairo,  at  the  suggestion  of  Thomas 
Dameron.  -«,' 

P.  G.  McDaniel,  from  Kentucky,  erected  the  first  store  building  in  the 
town;  Thomas  Dameron,  the  first  dwelling  house,  located  east  of  the  rail- 
road. J.  C.  Tedford  was  the  pioneer  physician.  Abner  Landram  was  the 
first  blacksmith,  and  Thomas  Carter  was  the  first  shoemaker.  B.  R. 
Boucher  taught  the  first  school.  The  Methodists  (M.  E.  Church  South) 
erected  the  first  church  edifice.  Thomas  Dameron  was  the  first  postmaster, 
and  wrote  the  first  mail  matter  that  was  sent  from  the  town. 

CLIFTON  TOWNSHIP. 

Clifton  is  the  middle  township  on  the  western  border  of  Randolph 
county.     It  is  five  miles  in  width  from  east  to  west,  its  greatest  length 


148  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

from  north  to  south  being  seven  and  a  half  miles,  giving  an  area  of  about 
321/2  square  miles.  It  is  watered  by  the  Middle  and  East  forks  of  the 
Chariton,  Muncus  and  Dark  creeks,  the  slopes  are  gentle  and  the  land  lies 
in  beautiful  waves.  Towards  the  southern  and  western  parts  of  the  town- 
ship the  hills  become  more  abrupt,  and  in  the  vicinity  of  East  fork,  on 
the  south,  and  the  Middle  fork,  on  the  west,  it  is  broken  and  somewhat 
ragged.  This  is  one  of  the  best  farming  sections  of  the  county.  The  soil 
is  deep  and  rich,  affording  such  a  variety,  that,  with  care  in  selection  of 
position,  almost  any  crop  may  be  developed  in  perfection.  About  one- 
third  of  the  township  is  prairie,  the  balance  timber  land. 

The  Wabash  Railroad  passes  through  the  southern  part  of  the  tovm- 
ship,  and  no  point  in  it  is  distant  more  than  seven  miles  from  that  road. 
This  gives  a  convenient  outlet  to  all  the  products  of  the  farm  and  easy 
shipping  of  live  stock  and  other  farm  products. 

All  the  field  crops  yield  heavy  harvests.  Corn  will  yield  8  to  12  bar- 
rels or  40  to  60  bushels  to  the  acre;  wheat,  15  to  25  bushels;  oats,  40  to 
50  bushels;  hay,  1  to  2  tons.  Besides  this,  blue  grass  spontaneously,  and 
clover  when  cultivated  give  rich  crops. 

Kentucky  is  more  largely  represented  in  the  early  settlement  of  this 
township  than  any  other  state.  Her  sons  and  her  daughters  have  ever 
been  in  the  front  ranks  of  civilization,  and  wherever  they  located,  lived 
and  died,  there  may  be  found  even  to  this  day,  among  the  present  genera- 
tion, many  of  the  traits  of  character  which  they  possed.  Early  settlers 
in  Clifton  township  are  as  follows: 

Joseph  Baker,  from  Kentucky;  Charles  Baker,  from  Kentucky;  Noah 
C.  Baker,  from  Kentucky;  David  Harris,  from  Kentucky;  David  ProfRt, 
from  Kentucky ;  Sadie  Baker,  from  Kentucky ;  Wm.  Titus,  from  Kentucky ; 
Russell  Shoemaker,  from  Kentucky ;  Levi  Fox,  from  Tennessee ;  Samuel  G. 
Johnson,  from  Tennessee;  Joseph  Harris,  from  Kentucky;  Noah  C.  Harris, 
from  Kentucky;  James  Holman,  from  Kentucky;  Hiram  Stamper,  from 
Kentucky;  John  C.  Turner,  from  Kentucky;  Augustine  Bradsher,  from 
Kentucky ;  Capt.  N.  G.  Matlock,  from  Kentucky ;  J.  M.  Summers,  from  Ken- 
tucky; T.  J.  Summers,  from  Kentucky;  Judge  D.  J.  Stamper,  from  Ken- 
tucky; James  Ferguson,  from  Kentucky;  A.  G.  Rucker,  from  Kentucky; 
David  Bozarth,  from  Kentucky;  F.  H.  Hackley,  from  Kentucky;  David 
Milan,  from  Kentucky;  W.  H.  Ball,  from  Kentucky;  W.  B.  Crutchfield, 
from  Kentucky;  J.  M.  Creighton,  from  Kentucky;  W.  B.  McCreary,  from 
Kentucky;  J.  M.  Patton,  from  Kentucky;  E.  Greer,  from  Kentucky; 
Thomas  Williams,  from  Kentucky;  J.  H.  Wayland,  from  Kentucky. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  149 

Samuel  G.  Johnson,  born  in  1807,  who  was  one  of  the  first  settlers  in 
the  township,  once  speaking  of  early  events,  said:  "I  came  to  the  town- 
ship October  16,  1833,  from  Wilson  County,  Tennessee.  We  all  lived  in 
log  cabins.  My  cabin  had  a  board  roof,  which  was  weighted  down  with 
poles.  When  there  was  a  snow  storm  the  snow  would  drift  through  the 
roof,  and  after  the  storm  was  over,  the  snow  would  be  almost  as  deep  on 
the  inside  of  the  cabin  as  on  the  outside,  the  beds  being  covered  like  the 
floor.  I  have  awaked  many  a  morning  with  my  head  and  neck  covered 
with  snow,  and  after  making  a  fire  had  to  clear  away  the  snow  from  around 
the  fire,  so  my  wife  and  children  could  get  up  to  it  and  warm. 

"The  floor  of  my  cabin  consisted  of  loose  planks,  sawed  by  hand.  The 
bedsteads  were  made  of  small  logs,  with  poles  put  across  and  boards  laid 
on  them." 

Such  was  the  primitive  method  of  living  and  yet  there  were  compen- 
sations and  pleasures  which  were  experienced  by  these  pioneers,  that  are 
wholly  unknown  to  the  people  of  today.  The  forests  abounded  with  game 
and  all  the  streams  teemed  with  delicate  varieties  of  fish. 

The  first  mill  that  was  erected  in  that  section  of  the  county,  was 
built  by  Ezekiel  Richardson,  in  1824,  on  the  Middle  fork  of  the  Chariton 
River.  Richardson  resided  in  Chariton  County  and  sold  the  mill  to  Levi 
Fox. 

The  first  religious  services  were  held  at  Joseph  Baker's  house,  but. 
were  afterwards  held  at  Ezekiel  Richardson's  cabin,  about  the  year  1828, 
where  they  were  continued  until  1834,  when  Mr.  Johnson's  cabin  was  used, 
as  a  house  of  worship.  After  a  period  of  four  or  five  years,  a  small  house,, 
known  as  Johnson's  school  house,  was  erected,  which  served  the  pui-poses. 
of  a  church  and  school.  Here  met  these  humble  Christian  worshipers, 
until  1846,  when  a  larger  and  more  costly  building  was  constructed  and. 
called  Providence  church.  This  edifice,  although  not  a  very  stately  and 
magnificent  one,  was  something  of  an  architectural  wonder,  as  it  con- 
tained 12  corners.  The  services  above  mentioned  were  conducted  by  the 
Methodists,  who  also  erected  Providence  church.  Among  the  early  min- 
isters of  the  gospel  was  Rev.  John  Shores,  a  Methodist. 

Clifton  Hill  is  the  only  town  in  the  township  and  was  laid  out  in  1866, 
on  the  southeast  quarter  of  the  northeast  quarter  of  section  35,  township 
54,  r.ange  16,  and  was  named  after  David  Clifton,  who  came  from  Owen 
County,  Kentucky,  about  the  year  1850,  and  was  the  owner  of  the  town, 
site. 


150  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

William  Holman  erected  the  first  house  that  was  built  in  the  town. 
The  first  hotel  was  opened  by  Julius  Rogers.  Dr.  J.  J.  Watts  was  the  first 
physician  to  practice  in  the  town.  Dr.  E.  F.  Wilson  was  the  first  resident 
physician.  The  first  school  was  taught  by  Ansel  Richardson,  from  Vir- 
ginia. William  Wagner  and  James  Maddox  were  the  first  shoemakers, 
and  W.  M.  Roberts  and  Cyrus  Clifton  were  the  pioneer  blacksmiths. 

The  present  village  ofl^cials  are:  Mayor,  George  F.  Christy;  clerk, 
Everett  Thurston ;  treasurer,  H.  C.  Eubank ;  collector,  P.  D.  Blake ;  street 
commissioner,  E.  E.  Hurt;  marshall,  W.  B.  McDavitt.  Councilmen: 
George  F.  Christy,  Everett  Thurston,  H.  C.  Eubank,  P.  D.  Blake,  E.  E. 
Hurt. 

CHARITON  TOWNSHIP. 

Chariton  township  lies  in  the  northwest  corner  of  Randolph  and 
borders  on  Macon  and  Chariton  Counties.  It  was  organized  in  1832,  and 
of  territory  originally  belonging  to  Salt  Spring  township,  and  extended 
12  miles  into  the  present  limits  of  Macon  County.  By  the  subsequent 
organization  of  that  county  Chariton  township  lost  two-thirds  of  its  terri- 
tory, and  was  reduced  to  its  present  dimensions  of  54  square  miles  in  a 
rectangular  shape,  being  nine  miles  long  from  east  to  west,  by  a  width  of 
six  miles  from  north  to  south. 

The  first  settlement  was  made  in  about  the  year  1829,  by  a  few 
families  on  each  side  of  Dark's  Prairie,  near  the  present  site  of  Darksville. 
These  were  followed  in  the  spring  and  fall  of  1830  by  others,  and  from 
that  time  the  country  was  rapidly  filled  up  by  immigrants  from  Virginia, 
North  Carolina,  Kentucky  and  Tennessee.  In  about  three  years  from  the 
time  of  its  first  settlement  it  had  acquired  sufficient  population  to  justify 
its  organization  into  a  separate  township,  with  Joseph  Turner  its  first 
magistrate  and  Henry  Smith  its  first  constable. 

The  soil  of  this  township,  while  ranking  along  with  the  best  in  the 
county,  is  remarkable  for  the  uniformity  of  its  adaptability  to  agricultural 
and  grazing  purposes.  There  is  very  little  waste  land  in  the  whole  town- 
ship, and  scarcely  an  acre  can  be  found  that  is  not  valuable  for  growing 
grass  or  grain.  The  soil  is  principally  a  black  loam  of  great  fertility, 
and  suflficiently  undulating  to  avert  disaster  from  the  crops  in  extremely 
wet  seasons,  and  yet  sufficiently  retentive  of  moisure  to  preserve  them 
from  total  failure  in  extreme  drouths.  The  township  is  about  equally 
divided  between  timber  and  prairie  land,  the  timber  embracing  wide  mar- 
gins along  the  streams,  and  the  prairie  occupying  the  intervening  space. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  151 

This  natural  arrangement  afforded  the  early  settlers  ample  scope  for  select- 
ing their  lands  with  a  proper  division  of  timber  and  prairie,  and  has  re- 
sulted in  the  establishment  of  some  of  the  best  organized  farms  for  mixed 
farming  in  the  county.  The  township  is  well  watered  by  four  principal 
streams  and  their  tributaries,  all  flowing  from  north  to  south,  and  so 
well  distributed  as  to  furnish  abundant  stock  water  convenient  to  all  the 
farms  the  year  round.  Along  the  eastern  margin  of  the  township  flows 
the  East  fork  of  the  Chariton,  and  through  the  central  portion,  at  an 
average  distance  of  two  miles,  are  Dark  creek,  Muncas  creek,  and  the 
Middle  fork  of  the  Chariton,  while  the  western  portion  is  watered  by  a 
tributary  of  the  Chariton  River,  the  latter  of  which  flows  from  north  to 
south  just  outside  of  the  western  boundary.  Surface  springs  are  not 
abundant,  but  unfailing  living  water  is  of  easy  access  in  well  distributed 
localities  throughout  the  entire  township,  by  sinking  wells  to  a  depth  of 
10  to  30  feet.  Its  inhabitants  are  engaged  almost  exclusively  in  agri- 
cultural pursuits,  and  the  well-improved  condition  of  their  farms  indicate 
their  general  prosperity. 

Darksville  was  settled  in  1856,  and  takes  its  name  from  a  creek  called 
Dark  creek.  William  Elliott  was  hunting  in  the  township  in  1821,  and 
night  overtaking  him  on  the  banks  of  a  creek,  he  camped  all  night,  and 
said  that  it  was  the  darkest  night  he  ever  saw;  hence  the  name.  Dark 
creek. 

Early  settlers  of  Chariton  township  before  1848  were:  John  Sum- 
mers, Aaron  Summers,  Johnson  Wright,  Allen  Wright,  Hezekiah  Wright, 
Nathan  Barrow,  Daniel  Barrow,  Joshua  Phipps,  and  James  Phipps,  from 
Kentucky;  Robert  Grimes,  from  Virginia;  Robert  Elliott,  Robert  Elliott, 
Jr.,  William  Cristal,  Thomas  Rice,  A.  R.  Rice,  William  H.  Rice,  George 
Shipp  and  Owen  Singleton,  from  Kentucky;  John  W.  W.  Sears,  from  Vir- 
ginia; Philip  Baxter,  William  Terry,  Jonathan  Cozac  and  E.  H.  Trimble, 
from  Kentucky ;  John  H.  Hall,  from  Maine ;  William  Rutherford  and  John 
McCuUy,  from  Kentucky;  Mathias  Turner,  Joseph  Turner  and  John  M. 
Turner,  from  Tennessee;  Mrs.  Wright,  Mrs.  Mary  Dawkins  and  Henry 
Griffith,  from  Kentucky;  John  M.  Gates,  Giles  F.  Cook  and  James  Carter, 
from  Virginia ;  James  Lingo,  Samuel  Lingo,  G.  W.  Harland,  Isaac  Harland 
and  James  Harland,  from  Tennessee ;  Hancock  Jackson  and  William  Sump- 
ter,  from  Kentucky;  Burchard  McCormick,  John  Gaines  and  John  Head, 

from  Virginia;  Thomas  Robert  and Chitwood,  from  Kentucky; 

James  Holeman,  Thomas  Gillstrap  and  Thomas  White ;  William  Brogan  and 


152  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Henry  Brogan,  from  North  Carolina;  Black;  Nathaniel  Tuley, 

from  Virginia ;  James  Hinton,  from  North  Carolina ;  Green  Shelton  and  N. 
Tuttle,  from  Tennessee ;  William  A.  Hall  and  John  H.  Hall,  from  Maine ;  Dr. 
R.  L.  Grizard,  from  Tennessee;  Dr.  Stephen  Richmond,  from  North  Caro- 
lina; John  Harland,  Josiah  Harland,  Lee  Harland,  Josiah  Smith,  Henry 
Smith,  John  Smith,  James  Smith,  William  Beard,  Josiah  Taylor,  from 
Tennessee;  William  Redd,  from  Virginia;  John  Richmond,  Samuel  Rich- 
mond, James  M.  Richmond,  John  Dameron  and  James  Dameron,  from 

North  Carolina; Pipes  and  William  Kpes,  from  Kentucky;  John 

Hix,  Elliott  R.  Thomas,  Henry  Thomas,  Lowden  Thomas, Haines, 

from  Virginia;  Bruce  Stewart,  Frances  Terrell,  Ned  Stinson,  John  Wilks, 
Tyra  Baker,  Andrew  Baker,  Douglas  Baker,  Alfred  McDaniel,  Thomas 
Kirkpatrick,  Ephriam  Snell,  Jordan  Elliott,  Perry  Elliott,  William  Elliott, 
Jr.,  H.  M.  Rice,  Joshua  Rice,  Bennett  Rice,  Yancey  Gray,  Mike  McCully, 
John  McCulley,  Jr.,  Robert  Turner,  Elijah  Turner,  John  Turner,  Carroll 
Holman,  John  Godard,  Samuel  Turner,  Bartlett  Anderson,  John  R.  Ander- 
son, Crafford  Powers, Campbell,  John  Campbell,  Thomas  Camp- 
bell, William  Edwards,  James  Lamb,  Ashbury  Summers,  Thomas  Egan, 
Benjamin  Cozad,  John  Terrill,  Caswell  Smith,  Grant  Allan,  Henry  Johnson, 
George  H.  Hall,  George  W.  Barnhart,  and  Silas  Phipps. 

One  of  the  oldest  settlers  in  the  township  was  Judge  Joseph  Turner. 
He  was  born  in  North  Carolina,  in  1802,  moved  with  his  parents  to  Tennes- 
see in  1815,  was  married  in  1822,  and  moved  to  Missouri  and  entered  the 
land  on  which  he  now  resides,  near  Eldad  church,  in  1830.  He  was  ap- 
pointed justice  of  the  peace  before  the  township  was  organized,  and  had 
jurisdiction  to  the  Iowa  line.  He  held  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace 
until  1850.  In  1861  he  was  appointed  county  court  justice,  was  president 
of  that  body,  and  held  the  position  nearly  six  years.  When  he  first  set- 
tled he  had  for  neighbors  Joseph  Holman,  George  Epperly,  Richard  Blue 
and  Asa  Kirby.  These  were,  perhaps,  the  first  settlers  on  the  west  side 
of  Dark's  prairie.  Richard  Blue  and  Asa  Kirby  were  the  only  heads  of 
families  then  residing  west  of  the  Middle  fork.  John  Richmond  moved  to 
Randolph  County  from  Tennessee  in  1830,  and  lived  in  Silver  Creek  town» 
ship  until  the  fall  of  1832,  when  he  entered  120  acres  of  land  where  ne 
lived  and  built  his  cabin  upon  it  in  pioneer  style.  He  raised  a  family 
of  six  children,  four  boys  and  two  girls.  When  he  first  came  to  the  town- 
ship, the  first  settlers  of  that  neighborhood,  already  mentioned,  had  been 
increased  by  the  addition  of  Yancey  Gray,  Mark  Crabtree,  Samuel  Rich- 


HISTORY  OP  KANDOLPH   COUNTY  153 

mond,  Josiah  Smith,  Henry  Smith,  James  Lingo,  Samuel  Lingo,  Isaac  Har- 
lan, John  Withes,  Andrew  Baker,  Tyree  Baker,  Jesse  Miller  Thomas  Kirk- 
patrick  and  Greenbury  Shelton.  Some  of  these  made  their  settlements 
about  the  same  time  with  Mr.  Richmond.  Among  those  who  settled  in 
his  neighborhood  soon  after  him  were  Daniel  Milam,  John  Gray,  Jonathan 
Haynes,  Thomas  Brookes,  John  McCully  and  Madison  Richmond.  On  the 
east  side  of  Dark's  prairie,  south  and  east  of  the  present  site  of  Dailcs- 
ville,  were  living  at  that  time  (1832)  Johnson  Wright,  John  Waymire, 
Joseph  Summers,  Hodge  England,  and  Pleasant  and  Nicholas  Tuttle.  With 
the  last  named  lived  their  father,  a  very  aged  man  and  a  revolutionary 
soldier. 

Among  the  strongest  minded  and  most  influential  men  of  his  day  in 
that  township  was  John  M.  Yates.  He  immigrated  from  Kentucky  to 
Randolph  County  about  1835  and  after  living  a  year  or  two  in  the  southern 
part  of  the  county,  settled  on  Dark's  prairie  about  the  year  1835,  and  died 
on  a  farm  adjoining  the  one  he  first  settled  in  the  year  1872.  He  was 
twice  married  and  raised  15  children,  13  of  his  own  and  2  step-daughters. 

Mr.  Yates  was  an  uncle  of  the  celebrated  Richard  Yates,  once  Gov- 
ernor of  Illinois  and  U.  S.  Senator  from  that  state,  and  was  himself  a  man 
of  much  more  than  ordinary  intelligence  and  soundness  of  judgment. 

Judge  William  A.  Hall  was  born  and  partly  raised  in  the  State  of 
Maine.  His  father  having  been  appointed  to  a  position  in  the  U.  S.  armory 
at  Harper's  Ferry,  Va.,  he  moved  with  his  parents  to  that  place,  and  when 
they  moved  to  Chariton  township,  about  the  year  1839,  he  soon  followed 
them,  being  then  a  young  man  nearly  25  years  of  age.  About  that  time 
his  father  died,  and  he  made  his  home  with  his  widowed  mother,  although 
he  kept  his  law  office  in  Fayette,  Mo.,  and  for  a  short  time  edited  a  Demo- 
cratic paper  in  that  place.  He  made  regular  visits  to  his  mother's  home 
in  Chariton  County  whenever  his  professional  duties  would  permit,  and 
very  often  walked  the  entire  distance  of  over  thirty  miles.  He  rapidly 
advanced  to  the  front  rank  in  his  profession,  and  on  the  death  of  Judge 
Leiand,  which  occurred  about  the  year  1846,  he  was  appointed  by  the 
Governor  judge  of  this  judicial  circuit,  a  position  to  which  he  was  con- 
tinuously re-elected  until  1861,  when  he  was  elected  to  represent  the  dis- 
trict of  which  Randolph  was  a  part,  in  the  U.  S.  Congress.  About  the 
time  he  was  first  appointed  judge,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Octavia  Sebree, 
a  niece  and  adopted  daughter  of  Uriel  Sebree,  a  prominent  citizen  of  How- 
ard County.     Soon  after  his  marriage  he  settled  on  his  farm  in  Chariton 


154  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

township,  where  he  remained  until  he  removed  to  Huntsville  in  1861,  and 
the  following  year  to  a  farm  near  Huntsville. 

In  the  winter  of  1860-61,  Judge  Hall  was  chosen,  with  Gen.  Sterling 
Price,  to  represent  this  senatorial  district,  then  composed  of  Randolph  and 
Chariton  Counties,  in  the  State  convention  called  by  the  Legislature  to  con- 
sider the  relations  between  the  State  of  Missouri  and  the  general  govern- 
ment, in  view  of  the  then  impending  crisis  which  threatened  a  disruption 
of  the  Union  by  the  secession  of  the  Southern  states.  In  that  convention 
he  sided  with  the  majority  in  favor  of  the  state  continuing  her  allegiance 
and  loyalty  to  the  Union,  and  during  the  war  that  followed  remained  a 
consistent  Union  man.  By  his  conservative  position  and  able  management 
he  did  more  to  protect  the  Southern  people  of  this  county  and  State  from 
military  despotism  and  the  lawless  acts  of  an  unrestrained  soldiery,  than 
any  other  man.  He  was  twice  elected  to  Congress  during  the  war,  and 
at  its  close  he  resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Huntsville,  in 
which  he  continued  until  about  1874,  when  he  improved  another  fami  in 
the  northwest  comer  of  Chariton  township,  where  he  resided  in  complete 
retirement  from  public  life,  in  the  bosom  of  his  family  and  surrounded 
by  his  flocks  and  herds. 


CHAPTER  XV 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 


JACKSON  TOWNSHIP— JACKSONVILLE— MONITEAU  TOWNSHIP— HIGBEE— PRAIRIE 
TOWNSHIP — RBNICK — SALT  RR'ER  TOWNSHIP — UNION  TOWNSHIP — MILTON — 
SILVER   CREEK   TOWNSHIP — MT.   AIRY— SUGAR  CREEK   TOWNSHIP. 


JACKSON  TOWNSHIP. 

Jackson  township  is  the  middle  township  on  the  northern  border  of 
the  county.  It  is  somewhat  irregular  in  shape,  and  is  less  in  size  than  a 
congressional  township,  having  an  area  of  17,400  acres,  or  271/2  square 
miles.  It  is  watered  on  the  west  by  the  East  fork  of  the  Chariton  and 
Walnut  creek,  and  on  the  east  by  Hoover  and  Mud  creeks.  Almost  every 
acre  of  the  soil  is  susceptible  of  cultivation.  Prairie  and  timber  land  are 
about  equal.  Its  valuable  minerals  consist  of  coal,  limestone  and  fire  clay. 
The  farms  generally  are  in  good  condition.  The  prairie  is  undulating, 
and  in  its  wild  state,  produce  a  strong,  healthy  and  vigorous  growth  of 
native  grasses.  In  a  state  of  cultivation  it  yields  generously  to  the  care 
and  culture  of  the  husbandman,  all  the  grains,  grasses,  roots  and  fruits 
usually  cultivated  in  this  latitude. 

The  early  settlers  in  Jackson  township  settled  generally  along  the 
course  of  the  streams,  and  in  the  timber ;  in  fact  the  pioneers  throughout 
this  Western  country  all  sought  the  timber  and  water.  The  prairies  were 
not  settled  until  many  years  had  passed.  Many  of  the  pioneers  were  poor, 
and  did  not  have  teams  sufficient  to  break  the  prairie,  as  it  required  from 
three  to  four  good  yoke  of  oxen  to  draw  the  plow,  and  coming  as  they  did 
from  Kentucky  and  other  States,  which  were  originally  covered  with  dense 
forests,  they  naturally  located  conveniently  near  to  or  in  the  timber.     The 


156  HISTORY   OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

old  settlers  now  say,  the  prairie  land  has  undergone  a  great  change  since 
they  first  came  to  the  county;  it  then  appeared  to  be  of  a  cold,  wet,  and 
clammy  nature,  and  did  not  possess  the  same  productive  quality  that  it  now 
has.  As  the  country  became  opened  and  settled,  and  the  prairie  were 
grazed  and  trodden  by  stock,  their  productive  qualities  were  greatly  im- 
proved until  they  are  now  considered  the  better  farming  lands. 

Jackson  township  is  not  so  well  watered  naturally  as  some  other  town- 
ships. The  streams  generally  vein  the  western  and  southeastern  portion 
of  it.  Walnut  creek,  the  East  fork  of  the  Chariton  River,  Hoover  and 
Mud  creeks,  and  their  tributaries,  all  take  their  rise  in  this  township,  and 
all  flow  southwest  and  southeast  excepting  Hoover  creek,  which  flows 
northeast. 

The  early  settlers  included  some  of  the  following  names:  Henry 
Owens,  from  Kentucky;  Isaac  Reynolds,  from  Kentucky;  John  Coulter, 
from  Kentucky;  Robert  Stevens,  from  Kentucky;  William  McCanne,  from 
Kentucky;  H.  J.  McCanne,  from  Kentucky;  Thomas  McCanne,  from  Ken- 
tucky; Nathaniel  Sims,  from  Kentucky;  Benj.  Poison,  from  Kentucky; 
James  W.  Lamb,  from  Kentucky ;  Milton  Durham,  from  Kentucky ;  Stokely 
W.  Towles,  from  Kentucky;  Leonard  Hill,  from  Virginia;  John  Hore,  from 
Virginia;  George  W.  Hore,  from  Virginia;  David  McCanne,  from  North 
Carolina ;  L.  C.  Davis,  from  North  Carolina ;  Jonathan  Hunt,  from  Vir- 
ginia ;  John  Ancell,  from  Virginia ;  Frank  Ancell,  from  Virginia ;  C.  F. 
Burckhartt,  from  Virginia;  Frank  Sims,  from  Tennessee;  William  Bailey, 
from  Tennessee;  John  H.  Penny,  from  Virginia. 

Among  the  oldest  settlers  were  Henry  Owens  and  James  W.  Lamb. 
Mr.  Lamb  came  in  November,  1837,  from  Casey  County,  Kentucky,  and 
followed  farming  and  later  kept  a  hotel  in  the  town  of  Jacksonville.  In 
1837  there  were  no  settlements  on  the  prairie.  A  road  ran  north  and  south 
through  the  township,  called  the  "Bee  Trace,"  so  called  from  the  fact  that 
it  was  the  route  traveled  by  the  old  pioneers  who  hunted  wild  honey,  which 
was  worth  at  that  time  twenty  cents  a  gallon. 

Mr.  Lamb  occupied  his  time  after  his  arrival  in  the  township,  cut- 
ting timber  and  splitting  rails  at  thirty-seven  and  a  half  cents  a  hundred, 
and  sawing  planks  with  a  rip  saw  at  $1.50  per  hundred  feet.  Tobacco  was 
raised  at  an  early  date,  and  taken  to  Glasgow,  where  it  was  sold  to  the 
merchants  and  shipped  to  St.  Louis  and  elsewhere,  for  $1.50  per  hundred 
pounds.     Bacon  was  worth  $2.25  per  hundred. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  157 

After  remaining  here  a  few  years  Mr.  Lamb  went  back  to  Kentucky 
and  while  there,  married.  After  his  marriage  he  determined  to  return 
to  Randolph  County,  and  in  1842  he  started  upon  his  journey  of  nearly 
600  miles,  with  ouly  $10  in  money,  his  wife,  a  horse  and  buggy,  and  nearly 
traveling  26  days,  he  arrived  at  his  new  home,  having  spent  all  his  money, 
excepting  seventy-five  cents.  Deer  were  so  numerous  from  1835  to  1840 
that  oftentimes  30  and  40  could  be  seen  at  one  time. 

Humphrey  and  Brock  erected  the  first  saw  mill  in  the  township,  which 
was  soon  destroyed  by  fire,  and  immediately  rebuilt,  when  it  was  sold  to 
George  W.  Jones,  who  combined  it  with  a  grist  mill.  Jones  sold  to  Benja- 
min Sims.  The  mill  was  located  about  half  a  mile  north  of  Jacksonville, 
at  a  spring,  which  furnished  water  during  the  dry  seasons  for  many  of 
the  citizens  of  the  town. 

The  first  church  that  was  built  in  the  toWnship  was  also  located  at 
this  spring  by  the  Christian  denomination  in  1852,  and  was  a  union  church. 

The  town  of  Jacksonville  is  located  on  the  Wabash  Railway,  19  milea 
northwest  of  Huntsville,  and  12  miles  north  of  Moberly. 

The  town  site  was  owned  by  William  McCanne,  Jr.,  John  W.  McCanne, 
St.,  and  Henry  Owen,  who  donated  50  acres  to  the  railroad  company,  pro- 
vided they  would  locate  a  depot  upon  it.  This  was  about  the  year  1858. 
The  town  was  named  after  Hancock  Jackson,  who  was  an  early  settler  in 
the  county,  and  who  filled  besides  several  county  offices,  the  position  of 
Lieut.-Governor  of  Missouri.  The  first  business  house  was  erected  by 
J.  J.  Humphrey  and  was  occupied  by  him  as  a  general  store. 

Samuel  Ridgeway  opened  the  first  hotel,  and  continued  to  occupy 
it  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1880.  Dr.  Burckhartt  was  the  first 
physician.  Thomas  Demster  was  the  pioneer  shoemaker.  The  first 
church  was  erected  in  1867  by  the  Christians.  Thomas  Griffey  and  Robert 
Skinner  were  the  first  blacksmiths. 

Masonic  Lodge,  No.  44  was  organized  in  Jacksonville  in  June,  1866, 
with  the  following  charter  members:  James  A.  Berry,  James  A.  Holt, 
James  M.  Hannah,  J.  H.  Pety,  David  Halliburton. 

MONITEAU  TOWNSHIP. 

Moniteau  is  the  middle  township  on  the  southern  border  of  Randolph 
county.  It  contains  a  fraction  over  37  square  miles,  and  was  cut  off  from 
the  townships  of  Prairie  and  Silver  Creek  after  the  construction  of  the 
Missouri,  Kansas  and"  Texas  Railroad,  from  Hannibal  to  Sedalia.     Soon 


158  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

after  this  event  a  depot  was  established  in  the  present  territory  of  Moni- 
teau, on  lands  then  belonging  to  Edward  Owens,  called  Higbee,  and  soon 
a  village  was  laid  out  on  lands  belonging  to  Edward  Owens  and  Joseph 
Burton.  A  post-office  was  also  established,  and  the  growth  of  the  future 
town  was  begun.  This  growth  was  afterward  accelerated  by  the  location 
of  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad  through  its  borders,  crossing  the  Mis- 
souri, Kansas  and  Texas  road  near  the  center  of  the  town.  These  arrange- 
ments having  been  completed,  a  petition  was  numerously  signed  by  citizens 
of  the  vicinity,  asking  the  county  court  to  organize  another  township,  to  be 
called  Moniteau,  as  it  would  be  located  on  the  head  waters  of  Moniteau 
creek. 

The  Moniteau,  Silver  and  Bonne  Femme  creeks  take  their  rise  in  the 
borders  of  this  township.  Along  the  borders  of  these  streams  the  country 
is  broken  and  hilly,  covered  with  black  and  white  oak  timber.  Where  the 
bottoms  and  valleys  are  broad  enough  for  cultivation,  the  land  is  found  to 
be  very  rich  and  productive.  Even  the  land  that  cannot  be  cultivated  is 
covered  with  a  heavy  growth  of  valuable  timber  composed  of  sugar  maple, 
walnut  and  cottonwood.  As  the  dividing  ridges  of  these  streams  are 
approached,  a  sightly  and  fruitful  country  is  presented,  now  occupied  by 
substantial  farmers,  and  highly  improved.  For  grazing  purposes  it  seems 
in  many  respects,  better  than  regions  adjoining,  which  have  a  richer  and 
deeper  soil.  Clover  and  timothy  produce  well  with  cultivation;  but  blue 
grass,  the  first  to  come  in  the  spring,  the  most  nutritious  while  it  lasts, 
and  the  last  to  be  affected  by  the  frosts,  is  the  spontaneous  production  of 
this  region. 

Bituminous  coal  underlies  the  surface  and  crops  out  at  intervals  along 
almost  all  the  streams.  The  proximity  of  the  railroads  to  these  deposits 
of  "black  diamonds,"  makes  either  enterprise  a  safe  and  profitable  invest- 
ment and  coal  mining  is  carried  on  extensively  at  Higbee. 

Moniteau  was  first  settled  by  Virginians,  Kentuckians,  Tennesseeans 
and  North  Carolinians,  among  whose  virtues  were  temperance,  industry, 
probity  and  hospitality.  Of  these  were  James  Dysart,  John  Dysart,  Dr. 
William  Walker,  Rev.  Jesse  Terrill,  Montgomery  Whitmore,  J.  Higbee, 
George  Yates,  Nicholas  Dysart,  Christopher  Dysart,  M.  M.  Burton,  Maj. 
J.  B.  Tymony,  Joseph  Burton,  Edward  Owens  and  George  Quinn.  Edward 
Owens  was  the  oldest  man  in  the  township  at  the  time  of  his  death. 
Among  other  settlers  were  John  Turner,  William  B.  Tompkins,  Lynch 
Turner,  Joseph  Wilcox,  Jacob  Maggard,  Charles  McLean  and  Thomas 
Dawkins. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  159 

John  Turner  erected  the  first  mill  that  was  put  up  in  the  township. 
It  was  an  old-fashioned  horse-mill;  was  located  in  the  northern  portion  of 
the  township,  and  was  running  as  early  as  1828. 

Thomas  Dawkins  taught  the  first  school  about  the  year  1830;  the 
school  house,  a  small  cabin,  stood  near  a  small  stream — one  of  the  forks 
of  Silver  creek.  Dawkins  was  from  Kentucky,  and  was  much  thought  of 
as  a  teacher. 

The  name  of  James  Higbee,  a  worthy  citizen  of  Moniteau,  now  de- 
ceased, gave  the  title  to  the  station  which  has  grown  into  a  lively,  pro- 
gressive and  thriving  town.  Higbee  is  situated  about  three  miles  north 
of  Howard  County  line,  at  the  crossing  of  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas 
and  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroads.  It  possesses  good  facilities  for 
shipping  second  to  no  place  in  North  Missouri.  It  stands  on  an  open 
ridge  two  miles  wide,  between  the  Moniteau  and  Bonne  Femme  creeks. 

The  present  city  officials  of  Higbee  are:  Mayor,  Lee  Thomason; 
clerk,  Richard  L.  Hines;  collector,  Joseph  W.  Burton;  assessor,  Walter 
Davis;  street  commissioner,  Oscar  Fowler;  health  commissioner,  George 
M.  Nichols;  marshal,  W.  Isaac  Williams;  fire  chief,  John  Egly;  aldermen, 
Roy  Compton,  Jenkin  Williams,  Clarence  Leland,  John  Little. 

PRAIRIE  TOWNSHIP. 

Prairie  township  lies  in  the  southeastern  corner  of  Randolph  County. 
It  is  the  largest  township  in  the  county,  and  has  an  area  of  about  88  square 
miles.  The  amount  of  prairie  and  timber  land  is  about  the  same.  As 
the  township  is  bounded  on  two  sides  by  Monroe,  Audrain,  Boone  and 
Howard  counties,  Prairie  is  in  the  front  rank  of  townships,  and  is  settled 
by  a  progressive  and  prosperous  people.  The  soil  is  a  black  loam  with 
substratum  of  clay.  The  land  has  an  undulating  surface,  drains  itself 
readily  in  seasons  of  protracted  rainfall,  and  retains  sufficient  moisture 
for  the  sustenation  of  vegetation  in  periods  of  protracted  drouth. 

It  is  watered  by  the  tributaries  of  Salt  River  on  the  north  and  east 
sides  of  the  "divide"  and  by  Perche  and  the  tributaries  of  Moniteau  River 
on  the  southwest.  These  streams  take  their  rise  within  its  territory,  but 
before  they  leave  it,  form  large,  deep  creeks  that  contain  water  during  the 
entire  year,  however  dry  the  season.  The  smaller  streams  being  numer- 
ous, supply  stock  water  for  every  part  of  the  district.  Coal  is  abundant 
throughout  the  district  and  several  mines  are  worked. 


160  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

It  is  often  the  case  in  the  east  that  coal  lands  are  unfit  for  anything 
but  coal,  but  such  is  not  the  case  in  Missouri.  Land  overlying  coal  beds 
is  frequently  as  rich  and  productive  as  any  other  land  in  the  country,  and 
this  is  peculiarly  the  case  in  Prairie  township. 

Among  the  old  settlers  of  this  township  were  John  Hamilton,  James 
Martin,  R.  P.  Martin,  Mrs.  Chisham,  William  Butler,  Joel  Hubbard,  Rice 
Alexander,  Hugh  C.  Collins,  Dr.  Presley  T.  Oliver,  Jackson  Dicker  son, 
Joseph  Davis,  Moses  Kimbrough,  Aaron  Kimbrough,  Thomas  Kimbrough, 
A.  Hendrix,  Benjamin  Hardin,  Asa  K.  Hubbard,  Presly  Shirley,  Jeremiah 
Bunnel,  Thomas  Stockton  W.  S.  Christian,  Granderson  Brooks,  Archibald 
Goin,  May  Burton,  John  Sorrell,  Henry  Bumham,  William  Croswhite,  John 
Kimbrough,  Bluford  Robinson,  Wiley  Marshall,  A.  W.  Lane,  Durett  Bruce, 
Reuben  Samuel  and  Joseph  Wilcox. 

Nearly  all  of  the  above  named  pioneers  were  from  Kentucky  and  many 
of  these  men  were  great  hunters,  notably  so  were  Durett  Bruce,  Joe  Davis, 
Cy  Davis,  Uriah  Davis,  H.  C.  Collins,  John  Sorrell  and  James  Martin.  The 
latter  in  his  early  manhood  was  very  athletic  and  was  probably  the  only 
man  who  ever  caught  an  unwounded  deer  by  running  after  it  on  foot. 
Durett  Bruce,  who  came  to  the  township  in  1837  lived  to  a  great  age.  He 
was  born  in  Fayette  County,  Kentucky,  eight  miles  south  of  Lexington, 
March  1,  1789.  His  father's  name  was  Benjamin  Bruce;  he  was  a  native 
of  Scotland,  and  a  kinsman  of  Robert  Bruce,  one  of  the  Scottish  chiefs, 
whose  deeds  of  bravery  and  feats  of  manhood  have  been  immortalized 
by  the  incomparable  pen  of  Jane  Porter. 

Mr.  Bruce  married  Miss  Sarah  Stephens,  daughter  of  Col.  Stephens, 
April  13,  1813.  In  1834,  October  10th,  he  came  to  Boone  County,  Missouri, 
and  after  raising  two  crops,  he  settled  in  Randolph  County.  Hearing  that 
the  wolves  were  numerous,  and  very  destructive  to  sheep,  he  brought  with 
him  to  the  county  15  sheep,  18  hounds,  and  a  cur  dog,  and  was  never 
annoyed  by  wolves  after  his  arrival.  He  was  in  the  War  of  1812  and 
served  under  Gen.  William  H.  Harrison  six  months  and  Gen.  McArthur 
four  months. 

In  early  life  Mr.  Bruce  was  apprenticed  to  the  trade  of  locksmith,  a 
pursuit  which  he  followed  until  he  was  past  95  years  old.  In  1869  he 
located  in  the  then  new  town  of  Moberly,  where  he  died. 

The  first  mill  in  Prairie  township  was  owned  by  Jesse  Jones,  and  was 
located  about  three  miles  southwest  of  Renick.  The  first  church  edifice 
in  the  township  was  called  Dover  church,  and  was  occupied  by  different 


PUBLIC    SCHOOL,   HIGBEE,    MO. 


COAL  MINE,  HIGBEE,   MO. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  161 

denominations.  The  first  school  was  taught  by  Col.  John  M.  Bean,  a  Ken- 
tuckian,  at  a  place  called  Oak  Point.  Lynch  Turner  was  the  first  officiating 
minister  of  the  Gospel. 

Renick,  the  most  important  town  in  the  township,  was  located  in 
1856,  after  the  North  Missouri  Railroad,  now  the  Wabash,  had  become  an 
established  institution.  It  is  situated  on  a  high  rolling  prairie,  on  the 
"Grand  Divide",  the  waters  on  the  east  side  of  the  town  flowing  to  the 
Mississippi  and  those  on  the  west  side  to  the  Missouri.  The  Wabash 
Railroad  passes  diagonally  through  the  town,  the  depot  being  convenient 
to  the  business  portion  of  it.  It  lies  six  miles  south  by  east  of  Moberly. 
Its  citizens  are  a  thorough-going  and  enterprising  people.  During  the 
Civil  War,  nearly  all  the  houses  in  the  town  were  destroyed. 

Masonic  Lodge,  No.  186,  was  organized  October  19,  1867,  with  the 
following  charter  members:  G.  A.  Settle,  A.  E.  Grubb,  S.  A.  Mitchell, 
James  Hardin,  Benjamin  Terrill,  J.  R.  Alexander,  R.  Davis,  T.  Y.  Martin, 
R.  P.  Martin,  J.  Y.  Coates,  S.  S.  Elliott,  William  Butler,  G.  R.  Christian. 

Clay  Thompson,  who  came  from  Kentucky  about  the  year  1856,  erected 
the  first  house  in  the  town;  he  also  opened  the  first  business  house  and 
hotel.  William  H.  Marshall  was  the  first  blacksmith,  Peter  Hoeman  the 
first  shoemaker.  William  B.  McLean  was  the  first  physician  in  that  region 
of  country. 

SALT  RIVER  TOWNSHIP. 

Salt  River  is  the  northeastern  township  of  Randolph  County.  About 
one-fifth  of  the  surface  is  prairie,  the  balance  is  timber  land.  The  prairie 
is  generally  level  or  gently  undulating.  The  timber  land  is  more  uneven, 
and  in  the  vicinity  of  the  streams  is  somewhat  broken  and  hilly. 

The  territory  is  well  provided  with  streams  and  stock  water  is  abund- 
ant throughout  the  year.  Mover,  Mud,  Flat,  McKinney,  Lick,  and  Painter 
creeks,  with  other  less  important  streams,  take  their  courses  through  the 
township  and  every  farm  is  convenient  to  some  stream  that  contains  water 
the  year  round.  Nevertheless,  for  greater  convenience,  ponds,  wells  and 
cisterns  are  dug  on  the  farms  for  the  use  of  stock.  Living  water  is  found 
at  short  distances  below  the  surface,  giving  a  permanent  and  inexhaustible 
supply. 

Among  the  early  settlers  of  the  township  were  H.  G.  Robuck,  M. 
McKinney  and  Strother  Ridgeway.  The  farms  in  this  township  are  gen- 
erally small,  averaging  in  size  from  100  to  200  acres,  and  very  few  ex- 


162  HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

ceed  the  latter  amount.     It  is  essentially  a  farming  and  grazing  country. 
The  quality  of  the  soil  is  rich  and  productive  and  easily  cultivated. 

The  reliable  staple  crops  are  com,  w^heat,  oats,  timothy  and  blue 
grass.  The  latter  is  used  almost  entirely  for  grazing  and  is  rarely  mowed 
for  hay. 

Coal  lies  a  short  distance  below  the  surface  in  many  parts  of  thi 
township. 

The  improvements  on  the  farms  are  generally  good.  Farmers  have 
neat  and  comfortable  farm  houses  to  take  the  place  of  less  sightly  edifices 
built  in  the  earlier  history  of  the  township. 

UNION  TOWNSHIP. 

Union  is  the  middle  township  on  the  eastern  border  of  Randolph, 
joining  Monroe  County  on  its  eastern  boundary.  It  has  an  area  of  about 
29  square  miles.  Flat  creek,  Coy  branch.  Elk  Fork,  Sugar  creek.  Mud 
creek  and  Coon  creek,  branches  of  Salt  River,  penetrate  its  territory  in 
every  direction  and  fertilize  its  fields  and  farms.  There  is  no  district  in 
the  county,  of  the  same  dimensions  that  is  better  watered. 

The  first  settlers  of  the  township  were  George  Burckhartt,  father  of 
Judge  G.  H.  Burckhartt,  Clemen  Jeeter,  Dr.  Burton,  George  Chapman,  Nade 
Chapman  and  William  Haly.  These  men  left  the  impress  of  their  toil  and 
industry  on  the  country  they  settled  and  improved. 

The  lands  of  this  township  are  unusually  fertile  and  will  compare 
favorably  with  the  best  lands  in  any  part  of  the  state.  The  territory  is 
about  equally  divided  into  prairie  and  timber  lands.  Each  division  is 
equally  well  adapted  to  cultivation  and  pasturage.  The  crops  of  every  kind 
are  heavy  and  the  live  stock  raised  is  of  superior  quality. 

Coal  is  found  in  large  beds  and  of  very  excellent  quality  in  various 
parts  of  the  district.     Limestone,  brick  and  potter's  clay  are  also  found. 

The  yield  of  crops  is  as  follows :  Corn  per  acre,  average,  40  bushels, 
extra,  70  bushels;  wheat,  average,  15  bushels,  extra,  25  bushels;  --ats,  25 
to  35  bushels  per  acre ;  hay,  average,  one  ton,  extra,  two  tons. 

Rev.  J.  A.  Holloway,  Mrs.  Wesley  Boatman  and  David  Myers  were 
early  settlers.     George  Burckhartt  was  the  first  settler. 

Milton,  the  only  village  in  the  township,  is  about  75  years  old.  Its 
trade  has  been  of  a  purely  local  character,  there  being  no  facilities  for 
shipping.  It  is,  however,  eligibly  and  pleasantly  situated  on  Elk  Fort. 
Until  about  1878,  four  ministers  made  their  homes  in  Milton,  to-wit:     Eld. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  163 

J.  A.  Holloway,  of  the  Christian  church,  Rev.  Peter  Parker  and  Rev.  W.  D. 
Hutton,  of  the  M.  E.  Church  South,  and  Rev.  W.  L.  T.  Evans  of  the  Mis- 
sionary Baptist  Church.  The  latter,  a  most  estimable  and  much  beloved 
man,  died  about  1879.     Dr.  R.  R.  Hall  was  the  first  physician. 

SILVER  CREEK  TOWNSHIP. 

Silver  Creek  is  one  of  the  four  townships  into  which  Randolph  County 
was  originally  divided.  It  was  made  the  smallest  in  extent  if  territory, 
because  it  embraced  the  most  thickly  settled  portion  of  the  county  at  the 
time  of  its  organization.  This  fact,  taken  in  connection  with  its  location 
along  the  border  of  Howard  County,  which  was  settled  first,  leads  us  to 
infer  that  it  is  the  oldest  settlement  in  the  county.  Although  originally 
the  smallest  in  area,  it  gave  up  18  square  miles  of  its  territory  to  the 
township  of  Moniteau  when  the  latter  was  organized.  It  is  situated  in  the 
southwest  corner  of  the  county. 

While  it  has  no  railroad  running  directly  through  it,  its  people,  taken 
as  a  whole,  are  as  well  accommodated  with  railroad  facilities  as  those  of 
any  other  township,  except  Sugar  Creek. 

Within  a  mile  and  a  half  of  its  northern  boundary  are  the  stations  of 
the  Wabash  Railroad  at  Huntsville  and  Clifton  Hill.  Not  far  from  its 
eastern  boundary  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad  crosses  the  Missouri, 
Kansas  and  Texas,  at  Higbee,  and  on  the  south,  at  Armstrong,  in  Howard 
County,  is  another  depot  of  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad.  The  town- 
ship is  literally  surrounded  by  railroad  stations  without  any  railroad  run- 
ning through  it,  a  circumstance  which  gives  to  all  its  people  a  great  uni- 
formity of  railroad  advantages. 

While  Silver  Creek  contains  less  level  land  than  the  other  townships,, 
it  may  be  safely  asserted  that  the  most  fertile  tracts  in  the  whole  county 
lie  within  its  borders.  The  surface  ranges  from  the  gently  undulating  to- 
hilly  near  the  margins  of  the  streams,  and  with  the  exception  of  a  few 
white  oak  ridges  and  hickory  flats  in  the  northeast,  and  an  occasional  one 
in  other  parts,  the  soil  of  the  entire  township  is  of  a  black,  rich,  sandy  loam, 
interspersed  with  limestone,  which  does  not  predominate  in  any  locality  so 
as  to  interfere  seriously  with  cultivation,  but  is  generally  distributed  so 
as  to  furnish  the  requisite  supply  of  this  material  element  of  natural 
fertility. 

Here,  also,  is  to  be  found  one  of  the  best  watered  sections  in  the 
whole  country.     The  Sweet  Spring,  taking  its  name  from  a  noted  foun- 


164  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

tain  on  its  soutliern  margin,  washes  the  northern  boundary  of  the  town- 
ship, and  Silver  creek  with  its  tributaries  flows  from  east  to  west  through 
the  central  and  southern  portions.  The  names  given  to  these  streams, 
from  the  latter  of  which  the  township  takes  its  name,  are  significant  of 
the  purity  and  palatable  qualities  of  their  waters  and  of  the  perennial 
fountains  which  dot  their  margins  and  spring  spontaneous  from  the  fertile 
hillsides  in  many  other  parts  of  the  township. 

About  one-third  of  the  township  is  prairie  land,  lying  mostly  south 
of  Silver  creek  and  along  the  Howard  county  line.  Of  the  magnificent 
forests  that  originally  covered  the  remaining  two- thirds  of  the  township, 
all  has  given  way  to  cultivated  fields. 

Mt.  Airy  is  located  on  the  public  road  leading  from  Huntsville  to 
Eoanoke,  about  seven  miles  from  the  former  place  and  twelve  miles  from 
Moberly.    There  is  plenty  of  coal  in  this  township. 

Among  the  early  settlers  were  John  Viley,  who  was  judge  of  the  county 
court ;  Mcholas  Dysart,  George  W.  Dameron,  once  sheriff ;  Woodson  Newby, 
James  Goodman,  Morgan  Finnell,  William  Burton,  William  Thompson, 
Wilham  R.  Burch,  George  Ellis,  Newton  Bradley,  Jeff.  Fullington,  Samuel 
Cockrell,  John  Minor,  Paschall  Troyman,  Leven  I.  Dawkins,  John  E.  Walden, 
William  Nichols,  Roderick  O'Brien,  William  Holman,  Joseph  Holman,  Sr., 
John  Sears,  Sr.,  Hardy  Sears,  Iverson  Sears,  Allen  Mayo,  William  Mayo^, 
Valentine  Mayo,  John  Rowland,  Younger  Rowland,  D.  R.  Denny,  Samuel 
C.  Davis,  Isaiah  Humphrey,  William  Fort,  Asa  Kirby,  John  Head,  Ambrose 
Medley,  Basil  McDavitt,  Sr.,  Roger  West,  James  Davis,  Rev.  Samuel  C. 
Davis,  Thomas  Bradley,  Tolman  C.  B.  Gorham,  Tolman  Gorman,  Jr.,  Thomas 
Gorham,  Ambrose  Halliburton,  William  Morrow  and  Joseph  Morrow. 

Mr.  William  Mathis,  better  known  as  "Uncle  Billy  Mathis,"  emigrated 
from  North  Carolina  in  the  year  1827  and  erected  his  cabin,  in  primitive 
pioneer  style,  on  80  acres  of  land  entered  at  government  price,  within  five 
miles  of  where  Mt.  Airy  now  stands.  He  was  married  when  he  came  to 
the  state,  but  never  had  any  children.  He  was  there  before  the  county  was 
organized,  and  William  Holman,  Abraham  Gross  and  James  Dysart  were 
here  when  he  came,  the  first  of  whom  was  engaged  in  running  a  horse 
mill. 

Jerry  Jackson  came  with  "Uncle  Billy  Mathis"  from  North  Carolina, 
and  settled  in  the  same  neighborhood,  but  emigrated  to  Texas. 

About  the  year  1837,  Capt.  William  Upton,  another  old  settler,  opened 
a  store  at  his  place  in  connection  with  D.  C.  Garth,  who  lived  at  Hunts- 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  165 

ville,  and  had  another  store  there.  A  blacksmith  shop  and  a  tobacco 
factory  were  soon  after  erected,  and  the  place  was  first  called  Uptonsville. 
The  enterprising  people  of  the  vicinity,  however,  were  not  long  in  obtain- 
ing a  postoffice,  which  was  christened  Mt.  Airy,  a  name  which  it  has  ever 
since  borne.  Captain  Upton,  several  years  before  the  late  war,  sold  out 
his  farm  and  store  and  moved  south  of  the  Missouri  river. 

Judge  James  Head,  one  of  Silver  Creek's  pioneers,  a  resident  when 
the  county  was  organized,  and  one  of  the  judges  of  the  first  county  court, 
founded  Roanoke  on  the  Howard  county  line  in  1836.  The  place  at  first 
went  by  several  names,  as  suited  the  fancy  of  the  settlers,  such  as  Head's 
Store,  and  Van  Buren,  the  favorite  and  successful  Democratic  candidate 
for  the  presidency  for  that  year.  But  when  the  postoflBce  was  established 
there,  at  the  suggestion  of  Judge  Head,  it  was  named  for  the  residence 
of  a  favorite  statesman  of  his  native  state — the  celebrated  John  Randolph, 
of  Roanoke.  Judge  Head  emigrated  to  Randolph  County,  from  Orange 
County,  Virginia,  several  years  before  the  county  was  organized.  He  was 
accompanied  by  his  sister,  Mrs.  Fannie  Medley  and  her  husband,  Jacob 
Medley,  who  settled  near  himi,  and  was  the  first  collector  of  Randolph 
County.  Judge  Head  lived  on  his  farm  adjoining  Roanoke,  and  carried 
on  business  in  the  town,  until  1849,  when  he  moved  to  Lockhart,  Texas, 
where  he  died  in  1875,  at  the  age  of  82  years.  He  was  followed  to  this 
state  in  1831  by  his  father  and  mother,  and  all  his  remaining  brothers  and 
sisters,  except  Mrs.  Minor  Rucker,  who  came  with  her  husband  and  family 
in  1837.  They  all  settled  in  Randolph  County.  His  father,  John  Head, 
and  his  brother,  John  Head,  Jr.,  settled  in  Silver  Creek,  two  miles  north  of 
Roanoke,  the  former  on  the  farm  where  he  resided  until  his  death  in 
1852.  All  the  others  settled  in  and  around  Huntsville.  These  were  Dr. 
Walker  Head,  who  was  twice  elected  to  the  legislature  from  this  county, 
and  at  the  time  of  his  death  in  1845,  he  had  just  been  elected  a  delegate 
to  the  state  convention,  to  revise  the  constitution.  Mrs.  Emily  Chiles, 
Mrs.  Sarah  D.  Allen,  Mrs.  Amanda  Garth,  and  Mrs.  Harriet  Rucker  were 
other  members  of  the  family.  Mrs.  Martha  Price,  the  youngest  daughter, 
was  single  when  she  came  to  the  state,  and  was  married  to  General  Sterling 
Price,  at  her  father's  residence  in  Silver  Creek  township,  in  the  year  1838. 

Robert  Smith,  who  operated  a  tobacco  factory,  half  a  mile  east  of 
Mt.  Airy,  was  an  old  settler.  He  came  to  Huntsville  in  1837,  where  he 
remained  six  years,  and  then  moved  to  Silver  Creek. 


166  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

John  Osborn  emigrated  from  Orange  County,  Virginia,  in  1835.  He 
purchased  dry  goods  and  other  family  supplies  at  Old  Chariton,  in  Chariton 
County.  Allen  Mayo,  Daniel  McDavitt  and  William  Ferguson  were  Mr. 
Osborn's  earliest  neighbors,  having  preceded  him  in  the  settlement. 

Rev.  William  H.  Mansfield  resided  one  mile  northeast  of  Roanoke,  on 
a  farm  of  200  acres  which  he  settled  in  1831,  and  was  one  of  the  oldest 
men  in  Silver  Creek  township  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  born  in 
Orange  County,  Virginia,  and  resided  in  this  county  fifty  years.  He  was 
married  in  1814,  in  Virginia,  to  Miss  Salina  Eddings,  and  they  had  thir- 
teen children.  Mr.  Mansfield  was  a  veteran  of  the  War  of  1812,  and  drew 
the  usual  pension.  He  took  a  just  pride  in  having  participated  in  the 
stirring  events  of  that  great  national  drama,  in  which  his  valor  and 
patriotism  contributed  to  win  imperishable  honor  for  Americans  and  vin- 
dicated our  national  motto,  "Free  Trade  and  Sailors'  Rights."  He  never 
departed  from  the  political  faith  which  inspired  his  early  manhood,  and 
in  his  old  age  he  adhered  with  unwavering  fidelity  to  the  principles  which 
in  his  youth  he  drew  his  sword  to  defend.  He  was  a  devoted  Christian, 
and  a  member  of  the  Missionary  Baptist  church  for  nearly  three-quarters 
of  a  century.  He  was  ordained  a  minister  of  the  gospel  in  1832,  and  for 
more  than  forty  years  valiantly  carried  the  banner  of  the  Cross,  until 
increasing  age  and  corpulency  compelled  him  to  abandon  the  active  duties 
of  the  ministry,  when,  under  a  conscious  conviction  of  having  finished 
his  appointed  work,  he  retired  to  the  shades  of  a  more  private  life.  Being 
seldom  away  from  home  he  was  very  often  called  upon  to  perform  the  mar- 
riage ceremony,  and  was  noted  for  his  clemency  towards  runaway  couples, 
whom  he  never  declined  to  unite,  unless  prevented  by  a  legal  barrier.  He 
was  remarkable  for  his  sociability  and  hospitality,  and  always  gave  his 
friends  a  dinner  on  Christmas  Day,  and  on  New  Year's  1878,  he  celebrated 
his  golden  wedding. 

Mrs.  Salina  Mansfield,  his  wife,  was  the  oldest  woman  in  the  township 
at  the  time  of  her  death.  She  was  much  beloved  on  account  of  her  social 
and  Christian  virtues,  and,  like  her  husband,  was  a  zealous  Christian  and 
member  of  the  Baptist  church. 

SUGAR  CREEK  TOWNSHIP. 

This  is  one  of  the  original  municipal  townships,  and  was  organized  in 
1829.  Its  general  shape  is  that  of  an  L,  a  strip  six  miles  long  and  two 
miles  wide  forming  the  lower  extension  of  the  letter,  while  a  strip  four 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  167 

miles  wide  and  six  and  a  half  miles  long  composes  the  upper  extension. 
The  township  contains  about  thirty-six  square  miles.  It  has  been  much 
reduced  from  its  original  limits,  other  townships  having  been  formed  from 
it.  The  narrow  strip  of  the  township  reaches  to  the  eastern  border  of 
the  county,  while  the  greater  body  of  land  hes  six  miles  west  of  that  boun- 
dary. 

The  "divide"  runs  through  its  territory  in  a  north  direction,  in  the 
eastern  central  portion  of  the  township.  The  eastern  part,  therefore,  con- 
tributes its  waters  to  the  Mississippi  river,  while  the  streams  of  the  western 
part  are  tributary  to  the  Missouri. 

Among  the  earliest  settlers  having  made  their  homes  in  the  county 
before  it  was  originated  were  Reuben  Cornelius,  Benjamin  Hardin,  Mal- 
com  Galbreath  and  T.  N,  Galbreath.  The  latter  lived  in  Prairie  township. 
In  1822,  when  he  first  settled  there,  and  even  at  a  much  later  period,  elk, 
deer,  bear,  wild  turkeys  and  grouse  were  abundant  for  game,  while  wolves, 
foxes,  wild  cats  and  panthers  were  numerous.  Col.  P.  P.  Ruby,  T.  P. 
White,  John  Hannah,  Alexander  Jones,  John  Grimes,  Elijah  Williams, 
Patrick  Lynch,  W.  H.  Baird  and  Eli  Owens  were  among  the  early  settlers. 

Wild  honey  proved  a  profitable  crop,  and  could  be  found  with  little 
labor.  In  1823,  or  1824,  Mr.  Whittenburg  built  a  mill  in  the  southeastern 
part  of  the  county,  and  Mr.  Goggin  one  within  the  present  corporate  limits 
of  Huntsville.  These  were  draught  or  hors3  mills,  grinding  corn  alone. 
Previous  to  that  meal  was  ground  on  hand  mills  or  grated  on  graters  pre- 
pared for  the  purpose.  Little  wheat  flour  was  used,  and  what  was  con- 
sumed was  brought  from  Old  Franklin,  more  than  forty  miles  distant. 

The  land  is  diversified  with  prairie  and  timber ;  comparatively  little  of 
it  is  so  broken  as  to  be  unfit  for  cultivation,  and  all  of  it  is  adapted  to 
grazing. 

In  the  early  settlement  of  the  county  the  native  grasses  held  possession 
of  the  soil,  and  blue  grass  was  unknown.  When  the  lands  were  enclosed, 
and  the  trampling  and  grazing  of  stock  had  killed  the  native  grass,  blue 
grass  began  to  make  its  appearance;  showing  that  it  is  an  indigenous 
growth  in  this  soil,  and  neither  cultivation  nor  grazing  will  destroy  it. 

The  township  settled  up  slowly,  owing,  in  great  part,  to  its  remote- 
ness even  from  local  markets  and  the  want  of  adequate  transportation  to 
foreign  marts.  The  farmers  fed  their  grain  and  grass  to  live  stock,  and 
depended  upon  the  "drovers"  to  purchase  their  cattle,  horses  and  hogs. 
After  the  construction  of  the  North  Missouri  Railroad,  settlements  became 


168  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

more  common,  and  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  they  advanced  rapidly. 

The  creeks  in  this  township  are  numerous,  but  as  the  land  lies  along 
the  dividing  ridge  of  eastern  and  western  waters,  these  streams  are  small. 

The  variety  of  agricultural  products  is  not  surpassed  by  any  other 
country  in  the  world.  While  there  are  other  lands  that  may  produce  one, 
two  or  even  three  crops  in  larger  proportion,  there  are  non  that  will  yield 
so  generous  a  harvest  of  such  a  great  variety  of  productions. 


CHAPTER  XVI 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 
MOBERLY. 


CHARTER  GRANTED  TO  RAILROAD — PLAN  TO  INDUCE  SETTLERS  TO  COME  HERE — 
PATRICK  LYNCH  FIRST  SETTLER — REVIVED  AFTER  CIVIL  WAR — RAILROAD 
ACTIVITY— TOWN  PLATTED— SALE  OF  LOTS— HOTEL  BUILT— OTHER  BUILD- 
INGS—EARLY MERCHANTS — PANIC— FIRST  TRUSTEES— NEGOTIATIONS  WITH 
RAILROAD  COMPANY  TO  LOCATE  SHOPS  HERE  —  LAND  DONATED  —  BONDS 
VOTED — TOWN  INCORPORATED — FIRST  ELECTION — CITY  OFFICERS- PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS  —  PAROCHIAL  SCHOOLS  —  LIBRARY  —  CONTRACT  WITH  RAILROAD 
COMPANY — BOND — FROM    MOBERLY'S    FIRST    NEWSPAPER. 

In  1858  a  charter  was  granted  to  the  Chariton  and  Randolph  Railroad 
Company,  with  authority  to  construct  a  road  from  a  point  in  Randolph 
County  to  Brunswick,  in  Chariton  County.  It  was  desirable  that  this 
road  should  tap  the  North  Missouri  road  at  the  most  convenient  point  for 
its  construction,  and  what  is  now  Moberly  was  fixed  upon  as  the  point 
of  departure.  The  company  laid  off  a  town  and  drove  up  stakes  marking 
the  lots.  The  village  of  Allen,  one  mile  north  of  where  Moberly  now  stands, 
contained  several  houses,  and  was  the  shipping  point  for  Huntsville  and 
other  points  west.  To  induce  the  abandonment  of  this  village,  the  Chari- 
ton and  Randolph  Company  offered  to  all  who  would  remove  their  houses 
to  the  new  site  the  same  amount  of  ground  they  owned  and  occupied  in 
Allen.  This  was  in  the  summer  of  1861.  But  the  inhabitants  of  Allen 
either  had  no  confidence  in  the  company's  ability  to  build  the  road,  or 
thought  their  own  town  better  located,  and  destined  in  the  future  to  beat 
its  rival,  which  then  existed  only  in  name  and  on  maps.  From  whatever 
cause,  the  proposition  was  rejected  by  the  majority,  and  was  accepted  by 
only  one  person,  Patrick  Lynch,  father  of  John  E.  Lynch,  president  of 


170  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

the  Bank  of  Moberly  and  the  present  United  States  marshal  for  the  eastern 
district  of  Missouri,  had  a  small,  one-story  frame  house  in  Allen,  and  be- 
lieving the  junction  would  one  day  be  the  better  point,  he  placed  his  domicile 
on  rollers,  took  a  yoke  of  oxen,  and  drew  it  down  to  what  were  then  and 
still  are  lots  11  and  12  in  block  12,  fronting  on  Clark  street,  opposite  to 
the  Merchants  Hotel,  and  running  east  with  Reed  street  to  the  alley 
between  Clark  and  Sturgeon. 

This  was  the  beginning  of  Moberly.  The  land  around  was  a  prairie, 
without  fence  or  enclosure  of  any  kind,  and  here  "Pat"  Lynch  lived  with 
his  family,  solitary  and  alone.  The  Allenites  laughed  at  him,  but  he  stuck 
to  his  contract  and  stayed.  The  Civil  War  put  a  temporary  embargo  upon 
town  building,  and  Mr.  Lynch  concluded  to  profit  by  his  lonely  position. 
He  plowed  up  the  stakes  set  to  mark  the  lots,  and  cultivated  the  land  on 
the  west  side  of  the  railroad,  where  the  business  houses  of  Moberly  now 
stand.  Nothing  was  done  toward  the  further  sale  of  lots  by  the  Chariton 
and  Randolph  Railroad  Company,  and  Lynch  continued  to  occupy  the  place 
and  "hold  the  fort"  during  the  continuance  of  the  war,  unmolested  by 
soldiers. 

When  business  began  to  revive  after  the  war,  the  franchises  and  prop- 
■erty  of  the  Chariton  and  Randolph  Railroad  Company  passed  into  the 
hands  of  the  North  Missouri  Railroad  Company,  and  the  project  of  building 
the  road  and  extending  it  to  Kansas  City  was  renewed.  At  the  head  of 
that  company  was  Isaac  M.  Sturgeon,  of  St.  Louis,  a  practical  business 
man  of  eminent  ability. 

Having  determined  to  complete  the  extension  to  Kansas  City,  it  seemed 
to  be  certain  that  a  large  town  would  grow  up  somewhere  about  midwa,y 
between  the  eastern  and  western  termini  of  the  road.  The  junction  of 
the  north  end  with  the  western  branch  seemed  to  offer  a  good  opportunity 
to  lay  out  and  establish  such  a  place.  Moberly  was,  therefore,  resurveyed, 
and  a  sale  of  lots  was  advertised  to  take  place  on  the  grounds  September 
27,  1866.  In  the  first  map  of  the  place,  issued  by  the  auctioneers,  Messrs. 
Barlow,  Valle  &  Bush,  of  St.  Louis,  machine  shop  grounds  were  indicated. 
The  terms  of  sale  were  one-third  cash  when  the  deed  was  ready,  one- 
third  in  one  year  and  one-third  in  two  years,  with  interest  at  the  rate  of 
six  per  cent  on  deferred  payments^lO  on  each  lot  to  be  paid  at  the  time 
of  bidding.  The  sale  was  pretty  largely  attended  and  lots  sold  at  fair 
prices.  The  lot  on  which  the  Merchants'  Hotel  now  stands  was  sold  for 
$150,  and  some  other  lots  brought  prices  ranging  from  $85  to  $125.    The 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  171 

The  original  plat  of  the  town  embraced  four  blocks  north  of  Franklin 
average  price  of  lots  at  this  sale  was  between  $45  and  $50.  Before  the 
sale  began,  Mr.  Sturgeon  ordered  that  lots  11  and  12,  in  blocK  12,  be 
marked  off  to  Patrick  Lynch  and  a  deed  to  them  be  made,  he  to  pay  $1 
as  recorder's  fee.  This,  as  Mr.  Sturgeon  said,  was  in  consideration  of 
the  fact  that  Lynch  had  "held  the  city  during  the  war  without  the  loss 
of  a  life  or  a  house."  Among  the  purchasers  at  that  sale  were  William 
H.  Robinson,  0.  F.  Chandler,  Dr.  C.  J.  Tannehill,  Elijah  Williams,  John 
Grimes,  Ernest  Miller,  C.  Otto,  J.  G.  Zahn  and  Patrick  Lynch. 

Immediately  after  the  sale  S.  P.  Tate  began  the  construction  of  a 
hotel  on  the  southwest  corner  of  Clark  and  Reed  streets.  The  structure 
was  a  two-story  frame.  John  Grimes  also  began  the  building  of  a  hotel 
on  Sturgeon  street,  which,  being  completed  before  Tate's,  is  the  first 
house  ever  built  in  Moberly.  Messrs.  Chandler,  Otto,  Robinson,  Miller, 
McDaniel  and  other  parties  followed  in  rapid  succession,  and  the  noise  of 
hammer  and  saw  was  heard  everywhere  along  Clark,  Reed,  Sturgeon  and 
Coates  streets. 

Adam  Given  owned  a  horse  mill  and  sawed  the  lumber  for  the  first 
house  erected  in  Moberly.  The  house  is  still  standing, 
street  and  bounded  on  the  north  by  the  lands  of  the  railroad  company; 
five  blocks  and  five  half  blocks  on  the  west  side  of  the  railroad,  from 
Wightman  street  on  the  south  to  the  railroad  lands  on  the  north,  and  from 
Sturgeon  street  on  the  east  to  the  alley  between  Clark  and  Williams  streets 
on  the  west ;  and  also  fourteen  blocks  on  the  east  side  of  the  railroad  from 
Sturgeon  to  Morley,  and  from  Wightman  street  to  the  township  road  on 
the  north.  At  the  first  sale  no  lots  on  the  east  side  of  the  railroad  were  dis- 
posed of,  and  the  new  buildings  were  erected  on  the  west  side.  The  first 
brick  house  built  in  Moberly  was  a  dweUing  on  the  southwest  corner  of 
Coates  and  Williams  streets,  erected  by  Perry  McDonald.  In  the  fall  of  1867, 
another  sale  took  place,  at  which  a  large  number  of  lots  on  the  east 
side  were  sold,  and  the  work  of  extending  the  area  of  the  city  began. 
This  sale  also  attracted  many  bidders,  as  live  men  had  begun  to  appreciate 
the  value  of  the  location  as  a  business  point. 

Since  then  many  additions  have  been  made,  and  the  territory  of  the 
city  has  been  vastly  extended,  the  old  Umits  being  gradually  filled  with 
business  houses  and  dwellings,  the  population  steadily  advancing,  and 
the  permanency  of  the  location  becoming  every  year  more  and  more  as- 
sured.   The  wooden  structures  at  first  built  gave  way  to  more  substantial 


172  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

brick  edifices,  the  frame  hotels  and  wooden  store  rooms  were  superseded 
by  commodious  and  solid  walls,  and  the  small  one-roomed  dwellings  were 
moved  to  the  rear  to  make  room  for  larger  and  more  imposing  buildings. 

As  a  matter  of  history  we  record  the  names  of  the  first  dealers  in 
the  leading  lines  of  trade:  Dry  goods,  Tate  &  Bennett;  drugs,  0.  F. 
Chandler ;  groceries, — Lampton,  who  was  immediately  succeeded  by  Martin 
Howlett;  hardware,  Wilham  Seelen;  furniture,  H.  H.  Forcht,  and  imme- 
diately after,  J.  G.  Zahn,  both  houses  being  owned  by  E.  H.  Petering; 
lumber,  sash,  doors  and  blinds,  H.  H.  Forcht  for  E.  H.  Petering;  jewelry, 
John  H.  Kring ;  livery,  White  Bros. ;  clothing.  Levy  &  Krailsheimer ;  boots 
and  shoes,  L.  Brandt ;  butcher,  Henry  Overberg ;  barber,  0.  N.  Kaare. 

The  first  oflScers  of  the  town  were:  Trustees,  A.  T.  Franklin,  pres- 
ident; Charles  Tisue,  L.  Brandt,  Asa  Bennett  and  Wilham  Seelen;  mar- 
shal, Martin  Howlett;  justice  of  the  peace,  E.  Sidner;  constable,  Charles 
Featherston;  notary  pubhc,  W.  E.  Grimes;  postmaster,  Charles  Tisue, 
who  was  also  agent  of  the  Merchants'  Union  Express  Company. 

Up  to  1873,  the  year  of  the  great  panic,  the  amount  of  building  and 
the  increase  of  business  were  sufficient  to  justify  the  assumption  of  the 
now  popular  sobriquet  of  the  "Magic  City."  Mining  and  oil  districts  have 
sometimes  gathered  larger  populations  in  shorter  time,  but  they  have 
not  carried  with  them  the  evidences  of  solidity  and  stability  that  marked 
the  growth  of  Moberly.  But  the  panic  placed  a  temporary  check  upon 
the  spirit  of  speculation  and  enterprise.  It  checked,  but  did  not  stay  the 
progress  of  the  town.  Even  under  the  most  discouraging  circumstances  the 
work  of  extension  was  continued,  and  if  there  were  fewer  buildings  erected 
than  in  previous  years,  still  the  citizens  and  property  holders  had  unfalter- 
ing faith  in  the  future  of  Moberly,  and  continued  to  build  as  the  wants  of 
the  place  demanded.  Meantime  Moberly  had  grown  from  a  place  on  paper 
to  a  smart  village,  from  a  village  to  a  town,  from  a  town  to  a  city. 

On  the  6th  of  June,  1868,  the  first  board  of  trustees  met,  chose  A.  T. 
Franklin  chairman,  and  appointed  the  chairman  and  C.  Tisue  to  draft  by- 
laws and  ordinances.  At  a  meeting  of  the  board  June  14,  1869,  a  resolu- 
tion was  passed  offering  one  of  three  tracts  of  land  to  the  North  Missouri 
Railroad  as  a  site  for  the  location  of  the  machine  shops,  the  ground  and 
its  appurtenances  to  be  exempt  from  city  taxes  so  long  as  they  v/er3  used 
for  that  purpose.  These  tracts  were  the  Concannton  farm,  67  acres, 
northwest  of  town;  a  portion  (60  acres)  of  the  farms  of  Grimes  and 
Meals,  north  of  town ;  a  portion  (60  acres)  of  the  Hunt  and  Godfrey  farm 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  173 

south  of  town.  J.  D.  Werden  was  appointed  agent  of  the  town  to  confer 
with  the  directors  of  the  railroad. 

On  the  20th  of  August  the  purchasing  committee  reported  that  James 
Meals  offered  to  sell  "near  six  acres  along  the  West  Branch  Railroad  at 
$200  per  acre,  and  the  remaining  portion  north  of  said  strip  and  'ncluding 
the  ground  his  house  is  on,  extending  north  to  the  north  line  of  the  land 
known  as  the  reservoir  land,  at  $500  per  acre."  No  action  was  taken  by 
the  board  on  this  liberal  proposition,  but  an  election  was  ordered  for 
August  31,  1869,  to  take  the  sense  of  the  voters  as  to  whether  a  tract  of 
100  acres,  to  cost  not  exceeding  $12,000,  should  be  bought  for  machine  shop 
purposes.  At  this  election  T.  B.  Porter,  B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson  and  Josiah 
Harlan  were  judges.  At  a  meeting  on  the  4th  of  September,  A.  F.  Bunker 
was  appointed  a  committee  of  one  to  close  the  contract  with  the  railroad 
company  for  the  location  of  the  machine  shops. 

On  the  27th  of  June,  1870,  another  vote  was  taken  to  determine 
whether  the  town  would  purchase  a  tract  of  104  acres  of  ground  lying 
north  and  west  of  town  for  the  machine  shops.  The  result  of  this  elec- 
tion is  not  recorded,  but  it  was  held  to  have  been  unlawful,  having  been 
held  on  Monday.  A  new  election  was  ordered  for  August  2,  1870.  The 
election  showed  perfect  unanimity  on  the  subject  of  the  purchase,  as  there 
was  not  a  dissenting  voice ;  and  at  a  meeting  of  the  board  of  trustees  on 
the  4th  of  August,  twenty  bonds  of  the  denomination  of  $1,000  each  were 
ordered  to  be  printed. 

At  a  meeting  held  August  19,  1870,  William  Seelen  was  required  in 
addition  to  his  duties  as  vice-president  of  the  board,  to  "hear  and  try  all 
cases  for  the  violation  of  the  city  ordinances,"  and  on  the  7th  of  October 
he  was  appointed  to  purchase  six  street  lamps.  The  bond  of  the  town 
collector  was  fixed  at  $4,000;  but  in  1871  it  was  raised  to  $10,000,  show- 
ing a  hundred  and  fifty  per  cent  increase 'in  the  revenue  within  two  years. 
On  the  24th  of  August,  1871,  the  president  of  the  board  was  authorized 
to  borrow  "such  a  sum  of  money  as  he  may  be  able  to  obtain  at  15  per 
cent  interest  for  the  longest  time  he  can  get  said  money,  for  the  improve- 
ment of  the  streets  of  Moberly,"  for  which  the  bonds  of  the  town  were  to 
be  issued.  On  the  13th  of  November,  1871,  the  proposition  to  donate  money 
to  the  North  Missouri  Railroad  Company  for  machine  shops  was  renewed. 
On  the  21st  of  March,  1871,  the  board  of  trustees  accepted  the  proposi- 
tion of  Dr.  C.  J.  Tannehill  to  donate  the  block  which  is  known  as  Tanne- 
hill  Park  and  on  which  the  public  school  building  now  stands,  as  a  public 
park. 


174  HISTORY   OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

On  the  25th  of  March,  an  election  was  held  to  determine  whether  the 
city  should  purchase  and  donate  to  the  St.  Louis,  Kansas  City  and  North- 
ern Railroad  Company  200  acres  of  land  lying  between  the  west  branch 
and  the  main  line,  for  the  erection  of  machine  shops.  The  election  resulted 
favorably,  the  board  of  trustees  proposed  to  donate  this  land,  also  618 
acres  one  and  a  half  miles  west  of  that  tract,  and  exempt  the  whole 
for  twenty  years  from  all  city  taxes.  Another  inducement  held  out  was 
that  the  land  thus  given  contained  an  inexhaustible  bed  of  coal.  Hon. 
William  A.  Hall  was  appointed  the  agent  of  the  town  to  present  the  oropo- 
sition.  The  contract  was  subsequently  made  and  was  ratified  by  the  trus- 
tees of  Moberly  April  2,  1872. 

At  a  meeting  of  the  board  on  the  3d  of  April,  1872,  W.  F.  Barrows 
was  appointed  to  contract  for  the  lithographing  of  seventy  bonds  of  the 
denominations  of  $500  each,  bearing  10  per  cent  interest,  and  amounting 
in  the  aggregate  to  $35,000,  payable  in  ten  years.  He  was  also  empowered 
to  sell  these  bonds  without  limitation  as  to  price.  At  the  same  time  a 
special  election  was  ordered  to  take  place  May  10,  1872,  to  determine 
whether  the  town  would  purchase  818  acres  of  land  for  the  car  shops. 
The  election  resulted  in  favor  of  the  purchase  by  a  vote  of  299  for,  to 
4  against  it,  and  bonds  to  the  amount  of  $27,000  were  ordered  to  be  issued. 
On  the  26th  of  August,  same  year,  right  of  way  was  granted  to  the  Mis- 
souri, Kansas  and  Texas  Railway  Company  to  construct  their  road  the 
entire  length  of  Moulton  street,  and  across  "any  other  street  in  said 
town." 

An  election  was  held  P^ebruary  1,  1873,  to  ascertain  "whether  a  ma- 
jority of  the  citizens  of  the  town  are  in  favor  of  having  the  town  of 
Moberly  incorporated  under  a  special  charter  by  act  of  the  legislature," 
J.  T.  Young,  J.  H.  Burkholder,  H.  M.  Porter,  B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson  and  T.  P. 
White  having  been  appointed  in  the  preceding  December  to  draft  the  char- 
ter. This  election  resulted  in  favor  of  the  charter,  and  T.  P.  White  was 
appointed  to  go  to  Jefferson  City  in  the  interest  of  the  town.  On  the  5th 
of  March,  a  legislative  delegation  visited  Moberly  and  a  supper  was  given 
them  by  the  city,  which  cost  $272. 

The  first  election  under  the  charter  granted  by  the  legislature  was 
held  April  8,  1873,  and  resulted  as  follows:  T.  P.  White,  mayor;  council- 
man at  large,  C.  P.  Apgar;  councilman:  FirsT;  ward,  H.  C.  Moss;  second 
ward,  William  Seelen;  third  ward,  D.  H.  Fitch  and  B.  R.  White.  Clerk, 
C.  B.  Rodes.    At  that  election,  also,  it  was  decided  to  fund  the  debt  of  the 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  175 

tov/r.,  under  the  general  law,  by  a  vote  of  509  to  4.  The  bonds  of  the  city 
were  ordered  by  the  first  council  to  be  of  the  denomination  of  $500  each, 
to  be  issued  to  W.  F.  Barrows  or  bearer,  payable  ten  years  after  date, 
redeemable  at  option  of  the  city  after  five  years,  with  ten  per  cent  interest 
payable  semi-annually.  The  bonds  authorized  to  be  issued  amounted  to 
$30,000. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  officers  of  Moberly  from  the  founding  of  the 
town  in  1869  until  its  incorporation  in  1873 :  1868 — Board  of  trustees,  A. 
T.  Frankhn,  chairman;  Charles  Tisue,  Asa  Bennett,  Louis  Brandt,  Wil- 
liam Seelin;  marshal,  S.  L.  Austin,  E.  Sidner,  Martin  Howlett;  clerk,  J. 
W.  Dorser;  treasurer,  W.  E.  Grimes;  assessor,  William  Williams,  W.  S. 
Tompkins ;  collector,  Martin  Howlett. 

1869 — Board  of  trustees,  A.  T.  Franklin,  chairman;  Charles  Tisue, 
William  Seelen,  James  True,  Elijah  Williams;  marshal,  Martin  Howlett; 
clerk,  I.  B.  Porter;  treasurer,  W.  E.  Grimes,  C.  J.  Tannehill;  assessor, 

B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson;  collector,  Martin  Howlett;  street  commissioner,  M. 
Howlett;  assistant  marshal,  Isaac  Jacobs. 

1870 — Board  of  trustees,  A.  T.  Bunker,  chairman;  D.  W.  Brinkernoff, 
I.  B.  Porter,  W.  Seelen,  A.  T.  Franklin;  marshal,  Martin  Howlett,  I.  W. 
Boucher,  George  W.  Dulaney;  clerk,  Ben  T.  Porter;  attorney,  Ben  T. 
Porter;  treasurer,  C.  J.  Tannehill;  assessor,  James  B.  Dameron;  col- 
lector, Isaac  Boucher. 

1871 — Board  of  trustees,  B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson,  chairman;  H.  M.  Por- 
ter, James  M.  S.  Berry,  D.  S.  Forney,  James  R.  True,  J.  H.  Burkholder, 
J.  M.  McQuaid,  J.  W.  Haynes;  marshal,  George  W.  Dulaney;  clerk,  J. 
W.  Dorser;  attorney,  Ben  Porter;  treasurer,  Charles  Tisue;;  assessor, 
E.  Sidener;  collector,  William  W.  Porter. 

1872 — Board  of  trustees,  J.  B.  Freeman,  chairman:  J.  H.  Burk- 
holder, H.  M.  Porter,  Peter  Fox,  J.  Grimes,  E.  T.  Tuckert,  D.  B.  White, 
J.  B.  Damerson,  W.  D.  Pegram;  marshal,  J.  W.  Ragsdale;  clerk,  J.  W. 
Dorser;  attorney,  Ben  T.  Porter;  treasurer,  T.  P.  White;  assessor,  D. 
S.  Forney;  collector,  William  W.  Porter. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  officers  of  the  city  of  Moberly  since  its 
incorporation  in  1878 : 

1873 — Mayor,   T.  P.  White;  councilmen,  C.  P.  Apgar,  at  large;  H. 

C.  Moss,   J.   T.   Kimbrough,   William   Seelen,   H.   Morgan,   B.   R.   White, 

D.  H.   Fitch;  marshal,  J.   W.   Ragsdale;   clerk,   C.   B.   Rodes;   attorney, 

E.  T.  Porter;  assessor,  J.  H.  Phillips;  collector,  J.  B.  Sherwood;  police 
judge,  W.  A.  Whitney. 


176  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

1874 — Mayor,  J.  H.  Burkholder;  councilmen,  W.  L.  Durbin,  at  large; 
M.  R.  Burns,  H.  C.  Moss,  Terence  Clark,  H.  Morgan,  T.  B.  Patton,  G.  F. 
Rothwell;  marshall,  J.  V.  Baker;  clerk,  C.  W.  Oak;  attorney,  S.  S.  Mc- 
Noughton;  treasurer,  E.  H.  Miller;  assessor,  W.  T.  O'Rear;  c( 'Hector, 
J.  B.  Sherwood;  police  judge,  J.  B.  Dameron. 

1875 — Mayor,  W.  L.  Durbin;  councilmen,  C.  S.  Buck,  at  large;  J.  A. 
Scott,  W.  R.  Mealer,  William  Seelen,  Terence  Clark,  W.  T.  McCanne, 
T.  B.  Patton;  marshall,  J.  V.  Howard;  clerk,  C.  W.  Oak;  attorney,  H.  S. 
Priest;  treasurer,  E.  H.  Miller;  assessor,  W.  T.  O'Rear;  collector,  J.  B. 
Sherwood;  police  judge,  J.  B.  Dameron. 
Dameron. 

1876 — Mayor,  J.  C.  Hickerson;  councilmen,  Terence  Clark,  W.  L. 
McCart,  at  large;  J.  Campbell,  J.  A.  Scott,  Paul  Roche,  William  Seelen, 
W.  A.  Rothwell,  W.  T.  McCanne;  marshall,  J.  W.  Howard;  clerk,  Wil- 
liam Oak;  attorney,  F.  P.  Wiley;  treasurer,  W.  L.  Young,  J.  L.  Wool- 
folk;  assessor,  W.  T.  O'Rear;  collector,  J.  B.  Sherwood;  police  judge, 
J.  D.   Werden. 

1877 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Haynes,  at  large;  0.  T.  Rouse,  John  Campbell, 
N.  F.  Haworth,  Paul  Roche,  W.  A.  Rothwell,  N.  B.  Coates,  S.  J.  Good- 
fellow;  marshal,  J.  W.  Howard,  G.  T.  Galbreath;  clerk,  William  Oak; 
attorney,  U.  S.  Hall;  treasurer,  J.  L.  Woolfolk;  assessor,  M.  T.  Wil- 
liams; collector,  J.  B.  Sherwood;  police  judge,  I.  W.  Boucher. 

1878— Mayor,  W.  T.  McCanne;  councilmen,  W.  F.  EUiott,  at  large; 
O.  T.  Rouse,  Dr.  Thomas  Irwin,  J.  M.  Kiely,  N.  F.  Haworth,  W.  A. 
Rothwell,  S.  J.  Goodfellow;  marshall,  G.  T.  Galbreath;  clerk,  Richard 
Brooks;  attorney,  W.  J.  HolHs;  treasurer,  A.  B.  Thompson;  assessor, 
M.  T.  Williams;  collector,  John  H.  Gravely;  police  judge,  J.  S.  Wayland. 

1879 — Mayor,  J.  H.  Burkholder;  councilmen,  C.  P.  Apgar,  at  large; 
Dr.  T.  Irwin,  A.  O'Keefe,  Winslow  Buck,  J.  M.  Kiely,  W.  A.  Rothwell, 
H.  Jennings;  marshal,  G.  T.  Galbreath;  clerk,  C.  B.  Rodes;  attorney, 
B.  T.  Hardin;  treasurer,  A.  B.  Thompson;  assessor,  J.  D.  Bailey;  col- 
lector, John  H.  Gravely;  police  judge,  I.  W.  Boucher. 

1880 — Mayor,  G.  L.  Hassett;  councilmen,  P.  J.  Carmody,  at  large; 

A.  O'Keefe,  Wilson  Robertson,   Winslow  Buck,  J.   Evans,  W.  A.  Roth- 
well, H.  Jennings;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  R.  Lowell;  attorney, 

B.  T.  Hardin;  treasurer,  A.  B.  Thompson;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan; 
collector,  R.  A.  Wilson ;  police  judge,  Zach  Fisher. 


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HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  177 

1881 — Mayor,  P.  J.  Carmody;  councilmen,  Hiram  Jennings,  at  large; 
W.  Robertson,  J.  D.  Lipscomb,  Winslow  Buck,  J.  T.  Evans,  E.  H.  Mix, 
W.  A.  Rothwell,  J.  H.  Miller;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  C.  T.  Hunn; 
attorney,  J.  W.  Dorser;  treasurer,  A.  B.  Thompson;  assessor,  W.  T. 
O'Rear;  collector,  R.  A.  Wilson;  police  judge,  Zach  Fisher. 

1882 — Mayor,  P.  J.  Carmody;  councilmen,  B.  R.  White,  at  large; 
J.  Q.  Mason,  J.  D.  Lipscomb,  E.  H.  Mix,  M.  A.  Hayes,  J.  H.  Miller, 
J.  T.  Williams,  William  Coyle;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  C.  T.  Hunn; 
attorney,  J.  W.  Dorser;  Hiram  Jennings;  assessor,  W.  T.  O'Rear;  col- 
lector, J.  B.  Davis;  police  judge,  Zach  Fisher. 

1883 — Mayor,  D.  S.  Forney;  councilmen,  A.  E.  Simmons,  at  large; 
J.  Q.  Mason,  W.  A.  Chisholm,  J.  E.  Camplin,  E.  H.  Mix,  M.  A.  Hayes, 
Norris  Tuttle,  William  Coyle;  marshal,  George  Keating;  clerk,  C.  T. 
Hunn;  attorney,  W.  B.  Sanford;  treasurer,  C.  P.  Apgar;  assessor,  W. 
T.  O'Rear;  collector,  J.  B.  Davis;  police  judge,  D.  A.  Coates. 

1884 — Mayor,  D.  S.  Forney;  councilmen,  A.  E.  Simmons,  at  large; 
W.  A.  Chisholm,  R.  C.  Murray,  H.  R.  Suppe,  M.  A.  Hayes,  Norris  Tut- 
tle, A.  O'Keefe;  marshal,  George  Keating;  clerk,  V.  M.  Tedford;  attor- 
ney, W.  P.  Cave;  treasurer,  J.  T.  O'Neal;  assessor,  M.  V.  Greene;  col- 
lector, C.  T.  Hunn;  police  judge,  D.  A.  Coates. 

1885 — Mayor,  D.  S.  Forney;  councilmen,  A.  E.  Simmons,  at  large; 
J.  Tagart,  R.  C.  Murray,  H.  R.  Suppe,  M.  A.  Hayes,  N.  Tuttle,  A.  O'Keefe ; 
marshal,.  George  Keating;  clerk,  John  Floyd;  attorney,  W.  B.  Sanford; 
treasurer,  J.  T.  O'Neal;  assessor,  W.  S.  Boulward;  collector,  Jerry  Shaw; 
police  judge,  A.  J.  Featherstone. 

1886 — Mayor,  A.  B.  Thompson;  councilmen,  H.  R.  Suppe,  at  large; 
J.  Tagart,  Robert  Little,  F.  Haley,  M.  A.  Hayes,  N.  Tuttle,  Enoch  Des- 
kin;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  John  Floyd;  attorney,  W.  B.  Sanford; 
treasurer,  George  W.  Sparks;  assessor,  C.  M.  Berry;  collector,  John 
Pierce;  police  judge,  A.  J.  Featherstone. 

1887 — Mayor,  Theodore  F.  Priest;  councilmen,  J.  Sam  Hedges,  at 
large;  R.  Little,  W.  A.  Chisholm,  W.  P.  Thompson,  Frank  Haley,  Enoch 
Deskin,  J.  W.  Ragsdale;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  F.  Rucker;  at- 
torney, William  Morrissey,  B.  T.  Hardin;  treasurer,  George  W.  Sparks; 
assessor,  W.  S.  Boulware;  collector,  John  Pierce,  William  Oak;  police 
judge,  A.  J.  Featherstone. 

1888 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Haynes;  councilmen,  C.  F.  Campbell,  at  large; 
R.  Little,  W.  A.  Chisholm,  W.  P.  Thompson,  J.  C.  Hutton,  H.  P.  Jennings, 


178  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

J.  W.  Ragsdale;  marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  F.  Rucker;  attorney,  W.  P. 
Cave;  treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  W.  S.  Boulware;  collector, 
James  W.  Wilhams;  police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 

1889— Mayor,  R.  R.  Haynes;  councilmen,  Tim  Freeman,  C.  P.  Wil- 
lett,  A.  T.  Franklin,  Denis  Hogan,  H.  P.  Jennings,  N.  F.  Haworth,  C.  Adams, 
H.  O.  Hannah,  Louis  Cross,  J.  C.  Hutton,  W.  H.  Wilson,  F.  E.  Shuck; 
marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  F.  Rucker;  attorney,  W.  P.  Cave;  treas- 
urer, V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  W.  S.  Boulvs^are;  collector,  James  M.  Wil- 
liams ;  police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 

1890 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Haynes;  councilmen,  Tim  Freeman,  J.  S.  Chad- 
wick,  A.  T.  Franklin,  J.  W.  Ragsdale,  H.  P.  Jennings,  N.  F.  Haworth,  D. 
W.  Wilson,  H.  0.  Hannah,  Louis  Cross,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  H.  Wilson,  A.  D. 
Terrill;  marshall,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  E.  Rucker;  attorney,  W.  P.  Cave; 
treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  W.  S.  Boulware;  collector,  James  M. 
Williams;  police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 

1891 — Mayor  J.  W.  Ragsdale;  councilmen,  Tim  Freeman,  J.  S.  Chad- 
wick,  A.  T.  Franklin,  T.  0.  Afflick,  T.  F.  Priest,  N.  F.  Haworth,  D.  W. 
Wilson,  G.  M.  Dulany,  William  Firth,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  H.  Wilson,  George 
P.  Shedd;  marshall,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  F.  Rucker;  attorney,  Will  A. 
Roth  well;  treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  Allen  D.  Terrill;  collector, 
James  M.  Williams;  police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 

1892 — Mayor,  J.  W.  Ragsdale;  councilmen,  Tim  Freeman,  J.  S.  Chad- 
wick,  A.  T.  Franklin,  T.  Q.  Afflick,  T.  F.  Priest,  N.  F.  Haworth,  J.  S. 
Hedges,  G.  M.  Dulany,  J.  W.  Walden,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  H.  Wilson ;  George 
P.  Shedd;  marshall,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  E.  Rucker,  attorney,  Will  A. 
Rothwell;  treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  Allen  D.  Terrill;  collector, 
James  M.  Williams;  police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 

1893 — Mayor,  J.  W.  Ragsdale ;  councilmen,  A.  B.  McCoy,  C.  A.  Settle, 
J.  B.  Hill,  W.  S.  Jones,  N.  E.  Walker,  N.  F.  Haworth,  J.  S.  Hedges, 
A.  S.  Hickerson,  Louis  Gross,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  D.  Bean,  George  P.  Shed; 
marshal,  J.  E.  Lynch;  clerk,  J.  F.  Rucker;  attorney,  Will  A.  Rothwell; 
treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  collector,  M.  J.  Tedford;  police  judge,  W.  W. 
McNich. 

1894 — Mayor,  J.  H.  Babcock ;  councilmen,  A.  B.  McCoy,  J.  A.  Medley, 
J.  B.  Hill,  W.  S.  Jones,  N.  E.  Walker,  N.  F.  Haworth,  J.  S.  Hedges,  A.  S. 
Hicherson,  Louis  Gross,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  D.  Bean,  I.  C.  Miller;  marshal, 
J.  E.  Lynch,  William  Fox ;  clerk,  A.  B.  Little ;  attorney,  Will  A.  Rothwell ; 
treasurer,  V.  M.  Tedford;  assessor,  William  Oak;  collector,  M.  J.  Tedford; 
police  judge,  W.  W.  McNich. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  179 

1895 — Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  A.  B.  McCoy,  J.  A.  Medley, 
J.  B.  Hill,  J.  E.  Camplin,  N.  E.  Walker,  N.  F.  Haworth,  J.  S.  Hedges, 
J.  M.  Williams,  Louis  Gross,  C.  P.  Apgar,  W.  H.  Wilson,  I.  C.  Miller; 
marshal,  William  Fox ;  clerk,  A.  B.  Little ;  attorney,  Alex  H.  Waller,  J.  C. 
Williams,  J.  W.  Wight,  Jr. ;  treasurer,  John  B.  Jennings ;  assessor,  F.  E. 
P.  Harlan ;  collector,  M.  J.  Tedford ;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1896— Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  A.  B.  McCoy,  H.  L.  Lee,  M. 
A.  Arnett,  J.  E.  Camplin,  N.  E.  Walker,  W.  W.  Babcock,  A.  S.  Hickerson, 
J.  M.  Williams,  L.  Gross,  E.  0.  Doyle,  W.  H.  Wilson,  I.  C.  Miller ;  marshal, 
shal,  William  Fox;  clerk,  A.  B.  Little;  attorney,  J.  W.  Wight,  Jr.;  treas- 
urer, John  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector,  M.  J.  Ted- 
ford;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1897— Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  A.  B.  McCoy,  H.  G.  Lee,  M. 
A.  Arnett,  J.  E.  Camplin,  N.  E.  Walker,  W.  W.  Babcock,  A.  S.  Hicherson, 
J  .M.  Williams,  L.  Gross,  E.  O.  Doyle,  W.  H.  Wilson,  I.  C.  Miller;  marshal, 
William  Fox;  clerk,  A.  B.  Little;  attorney,  J.  W.  Wight;  treasurer,  J.  B. 
Jennings;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector,  M.  J.  Tedford;  police  judge, 
W.  W.  McNinch. 

1898— Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  J.  A.  Tagart,  C.  E.  Hallibur- 
ton, J.  J.  Jones,  J.  E.  McQuitty,  N.  F.  Haworth,  A.  C.  Dingle,  I.  C.  Miller, 
W.  F.  Moore;  marshal,  C.  L.  Quayle;  clerk,  N.  E.  Walker;  attorney,  J.  W. 
Wight;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector,  M., 
J.  Tedford ;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1899— Mayor,  A.  H.  Waller;  councilmen,  J.  A.  Tagart,  C.  W.  Halli- 
burton, J.  J.  Jones,  J.  E.  McQuitty,  N.  F.  Haworth,  A.  C.  Dingle,  L  C. 
Miller,  W.  F.  Moore;  marshal,  C.  L.  Quayle;  clerk,  L.  L.  Wayland;  attor- 
ney, F.  T.  Woods;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan; 
collector,  William  Fox;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1900 — Mayor,  A.  H.  Waller;  councilmen,  L.  S.  Gaines,  Carter  Baker,. 
J.  E.  Camplin,  F.  C.  Jacoby,  A.  C.  Dingle,  J.  M.  Williams,  L.  Weisberg, 
I.  C.  Miller;  marshal,  C.  L.  Quayle;  clerk,  L,  L.  Wayland;  attorney,  F.  T. 
Woods;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector, 
William  Fox;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1901 — Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  L.  S.  Gains,  Carter  Baker, 
J.  E.  Camplin,  F.  C.  Jacoby,  N.  F.  Haworth,  A.  C.  Dingle,  I.  C.  Miller,  W. 
F.  Moore;  marshal,  C.  L.  Quayle;  clerk,  A.  P.  Little;  attorney,  F.  T. 
Woods;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector,  L. 
L.  Wayland;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor, 


180  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

1902 — Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  John  Ward,  Dr.  Burk,  J.  E. 
Camplin,  E.  B.  Mahan,  E.  W.  Roberts,  J.  M.  Williams,  J.  W.  Faessler, 
J.  E.  Ball;  marshal,  C.  L.  Quayle;  clerk,  A.  N.  Little;  attorney,  F.  T. 
Woods;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jenning's;  assessor,  F.  E.  P.  Harlan;  collector, 
L.  L.  Wayland;  police  judge,  D.  Proctor. 

1903 — Mayor,  A.  C.  Dingle;  councilmen,  John  Ward,  Dr.  Burk,  J.  E. 
Camplin,  E.  B.  Mahan,  E.  W.  Roberts,  J.  M.  Williams,  J.  W.  Faessler,  J. 
E.  Ball;  marshal,  J.  Patterson;  clerk,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  attorney.  Oak  Hun- 
ter ;  treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings ;  assessor,  J.  C.  Bounds ;  collector,  L.  L. 
Wayland;  police  judge,  S.  C.  Griswold. 

1904 — Mayor,  A.  C.  Dingle;  councilmen,  John  Ward,  Dr.  Burk,  J.  E. 
Camplin,  E.  B.  Mahan,  E.  W.  Roberts,  J.  M.  Williams,  J.  W.  Faessler,  J.  E. 
Ball;  marshal,  J.  Patterson;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney.  Oak  Hunter; 
treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings ;  assessor,  J.  C.  Bounds ;  collector,  L.  L.  Wayland ; 
police  judge,  S.  C.  Griswold. 

1905 — Mayor,  A.  C.  Dingle;  councilmen,  J.  M.  Williams,  E.  B.  Mahan, 
J.  Gowler,  W.  McGrew,  J.  E.  Ball,  E,  W.  Roberts,  Perrine,  J.  P.  Sinnock; 
marshal,  J.  Patterson;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney.  Oak  Hunter;  treasurer, 
J.  B.  Jennings;  assessor,  J.  C.  Bounds;  collector,  S.  C.  Griswold;  police 
judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1906 — Mayor,  A.  C.  Dingle;  councilmen,  J.  M.  Wilhams,  J.  V/.  Dy- 
sart,  J.  Fowler,  W.  L.  McGrew,  Perrine,  J.  P.  Sinnock,  W.  P.  Davis,  J. 
Ball;  marshal,  J.  Patterson;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney.  Oak  Hunter; 
treasurer,  J.  B.  Jennings ;  assessor,  J.  C.  Bounds ;  collector,  S.  C.  Griswold ; 
police  judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1907— Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  L.  Gross,  J.  P.  Sinnock, 
J.  Lotter,  W.  P.  Davis,  C.  B.  Dysart,  E.  A.  Willott,  J.  E.  Ball,  N.  Roe- 
buck; marshal,  John  Hogg;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  Elmer  Ball; 
treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  B.  L.  Young;  collector,  W.  E.  Travis; 
police  judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1908 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  0.  R.  Nise,  J.  P.  Sinnock, 
J.  H.  Lotter,  W.  P.  Davis,  I.  F.  Harlan,  E.  A.  Willott,  N.  Roebuck,  H. 
Owens;  marshall,  John  Hogg;  clerk,  J.  E.  Curry;  attorney,  Elmer  Ball; 
treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  B.  L.  Young;  collector,  W.  E.  Travis; 
police  judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1909— Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  0.  R.  Nise,  J.  J.  Patrick, 
P.  Packwood,  W.  P.  Davis,  I.  F.  Harian,  J.  M.  Williams,  W.  McGrew, 
Henry  Owens;  marshal,  John  Hogg;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  Elmer 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  i»l 

Ball;  treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  B.  L.  Young;  collector,  Will  Short; 
police  judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1910 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  0.  R.  Nise,  J.  J.  Patrick, 
P.  Packwood,  L.  Hunt,  I.  F.  Harlan,  J.  M.  Williams,  W.  McGrew,  J.  E. 
Ball;  marshal,  John  Hogg;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  Elmer  Ball; 
treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  B.  L.  Young;  collector.  Will  Short; 
police  judge,  B.  O'Connell. 

1911— Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave ;  councilmen,  0.  R.  Nise,  P.  B;  Saterlee,  C.  B. 
Dysart,  L.  Hunt,  I.  F.  Harlan,  W.  S.  Turner,  W.  McGrew,  J.  E.  Ball; 
marshal,  Al  Flemming;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  A.  B.  Chamier; 
treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  C.  W.  Hager;  collector.  Will  Short; 
police  judge,  F.  Tedford. 

1912 — Mayor,  W.  P.  Cave;  councilmen,  F.  M.  Holtsinger,  P.  B.  Sater- 
lee, C.  B.  Dysart,  W.  Biggers,  L  F.  Harlan,  W.  S.  Turner,  W.  Mc- 
Grew, J.  E.  Ball ;  marshal,  Al  Flemming ;  clei'k,  J.  F.  Curry ;  attor- 
ney, A.  B.  Chamier;  treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  C.  W.  Hager; 
collector.  Will  Short;  police  judge,  F.  Tedford. 

1913 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  F.  M.  Holtsinger,  C.  Baker,. 
William  Biggers,  J.  Fowler,  L  F.  Harlan,  W.  S.  Turner,  W.  McGrew,  J.  E. 
Ball;  marshal,  William  Hinton;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  A.  B.  Chamier ^ 
treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  H.  Solomon;  collector,  C.  W.  Kelly;  police 
judge,  F.  Tedford. 

1914 — Mayor,  R.  R.  Rothwell;  councilmen,  0.  R.  Nise,  C.  Bakeiv 
J.  Fowler,  William  Biggers,  W.  S.  Turner,  L  F.  Harlan,  W.  McGrew,  J.  E. 
Hall;  marshal,  William  Hinton;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  A.  B., 
Chamier;  treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  H.  Solomon;  collector,  C.  W.. 
Kelly;  police  judge,  F.  Tedford. 

1915 — Mayor,  I.  F.  Harlan;  councilmen,  J.  Tomlinson,  0.  R..  Nise,, 
J.  Fowler,  W.  Biggers,  W.  S.  Turner,  E.  Hutchinson,  W.  McGrew,  W. 
Butler;  marshal,  Wilham  Hinton;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,,  W.  B.. 
Stone;  treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  H.  Solomon;  collector,,  C.  W. 
Kelly;  police  judge,  A.  B.  Adkisson. 

1916 — Mayor,  L  F.  Harlan;  councilmen,  J.  Tomlinson,  O.  R..  Nise, 
J.  Fowler,  W.  Biggers,  W.  S.  Turner,  E.  Hutchinson,  W.  McGrew,  .War- 
ren Butler;  marshal,  William  Hinton;  clerk,  J.  F.  Curry;  attorney,  W. 
B.  Stone;  treasurer,  H.  J.  Lotter;  assessor,  H.  Solomon;  calleetor,  C.  W.- 
Kelly; police  judge,  J.  B.  Adkisson. 


182  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  present  city  officials  of  Moberly  are:  Mayor,  James  T.  Cross; 
clerk,  William  H.  Wilson;  treasurer,  Herman  Lotter;  collector,  E.  A. 
Bowman;  attorney,  Edmund  Burke;  police  judge,  William  Haynes;  mar- 
shal, Melvin  Marshall;  health  commissioner,  Dr.  Thomas  L.  Fleming; 
engineer,  Carl  Haynes;  street  commissioner,  James  C.  Green;  chief  of 
police,  Melvin  Marshall;  chief  of  fire  department,  John  Crews;  assessor, 
Ben  L.  Young;  councilmen,  first  ward,  William  Hulen,  M.  F.  Kirtley; 
second  ward,  William  Biggers,  W.  B.  Davis;  third  ward,  E.  P.  Hutchin- 
son, F.  M.  Grimes ;  fourth  ward,  W.  R.  Butler,  W.  P.  Vandegrift. 

MOBERLY  PUBLIC  SCHOOLS. 

Prior  to  1872  there  was  no  regularly  organized  public  school.  Pri- 
vate schools  were  taught  from  time  to  time  and  short  terms  of  public 
schools  were  held.  W.  Tandy  O'Rear  and  Charles  Rodes  were  among 
the  passing  teachers. 

In  the  year  1872  the  first  graded  public  school  was  organized,  the 
principal  being  Prof.  Tuck  Powell.  Among  his  assistants  were  N.  E. 
Walker,  G.  N.  Ratliff  and  Luther  Terrill. 

In  the  summer  of  1876  began  the  erection  of  "Old  Central,"  which 
stood  for  years  at  the  corner  of  Johnson  and  Rollins  streets.  At  the 
time  of  the  purchase  of  the  plot  of  ground  for  this  building  there  was 
a  thoroughfare  called  Phipp's  avenue,  lying  between  this  ground  and 
Tannehill  Park.    This  street  was  formally  closed  the  next  year. 

The  high  school  was  organized  in  1877  by  Prof.  Marion  Bigley, 
who  took  charge  of  the  schools  as  the  first  superintendent.  He  reorgan- 
ized the  old  first  ward  school  on  the  east  side,  introduced  new  methods 
and  was,  in  fact,  the  founder  of  the  present  school  system. 

In  the  fall  of  1885  the  frame  building  on  East  Rollins  street  was 
burned.  It  ■^Vas  not  rebuilt.  Instead  the  other  part  of  the  present  build- 
ing was  erected  in  what  was  formerly  Moss  Park,  at  a  cost  of  $13,200. 

West  Park  was  built  in  1884,  at  a  cost  of  §13,000.  This  building  is 
located  on  a  prominent  hill  in  northwest  Moberly,  and  is  a  commanding 
landmark. 

In  1893  came  South  Park,  another  fine  building,  which  cost  $16,000. 

On  the  evening  of  December  5,  1894,  the  old  Central  building  burned 
to  the  ground.  An  issue  of  bonds  was  at  once  voted  by  the  people  to 
erect  a  new  and  up-to-date  building  on  the  same  ground. 


HISTORY  OF  EANDOLPH   COUNTY  183 

The  first  commencement  of  the  high  school  was  held  in  the  "Wig- 
wam," a  big  frame  building  erected  on  the  corner  of  Reed  and  Fifth 
streets,  in  the  spring  of  1880  to  accommodate  the  domocratic  state  con- 
vention. The  "Wigwam"  seated  about  3,000  people  and  was  crowded 
to  its  limits  with  those  attending  the  exercises. 

The  graduating  class  consisted  of  Will  A.  Rothwell  and  Arthur 
Grimes.  Will  Rothwell  delivered  the  valedictory  address  and  Arthur 
Grimes  the  salutary.  During  the  evening  Superintendent  Biglow  was 
presented  with  a  handsome  heavy  gold-headed  cane.  This  was  the  gift 
of  the  students  of  the  high  school,  and  the  presentation  speech  was 
made  by  Hon.  F.  P.  Wiley.  The  diplomas  were  presented  to  the  two 
graduates  by  Dr.  W.  A.  Rothwell,  president  of  the  board  of  education, 
assisted  by  S.  G.  Mason,  secretary.  The  class  of  1916  contained  fifty-four 
graduates. 

The  school  facilities  were  increased  in  1913  by  the  erection  of  a 
modern  building  in  northeast  Moberly  and  the  addition  of  two  rooms 
each  to  East  and  West  Park,  and  later  a  new  $15,000  school  for  colored 
children  was  erected  at  the  comer  of  Franklin  and  Horner  streets.  In 
1916  a  bond  issue  of  $100,000  was  voted  for  two  additional  buildings 
and  improvements  on  the  old. 

Following  is  a  list  of  those  who  have  served  as  superintendents: 
Marian  Biglow,  James  A.  Rice,  L.  E.  Wolfe,  W.  D.  Dodson,  W.  E.  Cole- 
man, J.  A.  Whiteford,  J.  G.  Lilly  and  E.  M.  Sipple. 

Those  who  have  served  as  presidents  of  the  board  of  education:  I. 
B.  Porter,  W.  T.  McCanne,  Dr.  W.  A.  Rothwell,  W.  Simonds,  Westley 
Humphrey,  R.  C.  Murray,  Dabney  Proctor,  E.  R.  Hickerson,  W.  H.  Mor- 
ris, F.  G.  Ferris,  J.  S.  Bowers,  A.  B.  Little  and  Dr.  C.  B.  Clapp. 

DIREGTORS  OF  THE  MOBERLY  PUBLIC  SCHOOLS  FROM  1871. 

Name  Years  of  Presi-  Secre-  Treas- 

Service  dent              tary  urer 

L  B.  Porter 1871-1873  1871-1873  

D.  B.  White 1872-1874      

J  .  H.  Burkholder 1871-1873      

J.  T.  Kimbrough 1872-1874      

E.  H.  Miller 1872 

Henry  Morgan 1872-1878      1872-1878 

W.  F.  Barrows 1873-1874      1871-1874      


184  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

W.  T.  McCanne 1873-1880  1873-1880      

H.  C.  Moss 1873-1874      

T.  P.  White 1874- ._ 

A.  Steed 1874-1876      

S.  C.  Mason 1874-1881      1874-1881  

W.  H.  Selby 1874-1885      

W.  A.  Rothwell 1875-1882  1880-1882      

W.  .F.Elliott 1877-1883      1878-1883 

Wm.  Firth 1878-1879      

H.  R.  Crockett 1879-1881      

J.  C.  Kennedy 1879-1881      1881-1882  

W.  J.  Halleck 1881-1882      1883-1884 

James  Shaughnessy 1881-1884      

W.  Buck 1881 

W.  N.  Rutherford 1881 

W.  J.  Hollis 1881-1882      

W.  Simons 1882-1887  1884-1887      

Wesley  Humphrey 1882-1884  1882-1884      

R.C.Murray 1882-1893  1887-1893      

U.  S.  Hall 1882-1888      1882-1883  

C.  B.  Rhodes 1883-1885      1883 

J.  R.  Lowell 1883-1901      1883-1901  

C.  F.  Campbell 1884-1889      1884-1889 

Dabney  Procter 1886-1895  1893-1895      

A.  L.  Bassett 1886-1899      ^_ 

J.  T.  O'Neal 1887 1889-1901 

J.  S.  Bowers 1888-1915  1901-1913      

A.  W.  Quackenbush 1889 

E.  R.  Hickerson 1890-1896  1895-1896      

W.  S.  Wagner 1890-1894      

W.  H.  Morriss 1893-1897  1896-1897      

W.  K.  Megee 1894-1897      

E.  H.  Fitzhugh 1895-1896      

F.  G.  Ferris 1896-1902  1896-1902      

N.E.Walker 1896-1913      1901-1913  

J.  Thomas  Coates 1897-1913      1901-1903 

H.  V.  Estill 1899-1902      

Dr.  G.  0.  Cuppaidge 1901-1904     


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  185 

J.  S.  VanCleve 1902-1905  

W.  L.  Eddings 1902-1905  ,__     1903 

George  Manuel   1903-1914  

George  Elsea 1905-1914  

C.  H.  Nelson 1905-1911  

W.  S.  Orr 1911-1914  

A.  B.  Little 1913-1915  1914-1915  

J.  H.  Davis 1913 

J.  F.  McLellan 1914 


Dr.  C.  B.  Clapp 1914 1915 1914-1915      

Forrest  Martin 1914 

Robert  T.  Kingsbury 1915 1915 

A.  B.  Chamier 1916 

The  present  board  of  education  is  as  follows:  President,  Dr.  C.  B. 
Clapp;  secretary,  Robert  L.  Kingsbury;  superintendent  of  schools,  P.  P. 
Callaway;  secretary  to  superintendent,  Mrs.  Carrie  Simmons. 

PAROCHIAL  SCHOOLS. 

In  addition  to  the  public  schools  there  are  two  parochial  schools  doing 
excellent  work.  The  oldest  of  these  is  St.  Mary's  Academy,  which  is  in 
charge  of  Sisters  of  Loretto.  The  school  was  started  under  the  pastorate 
of  Father  McKenny  in  1877,  with  Sister  Phillippi  as  the  first  Mother  Supe- 
rior. The  building  is  located  at  the  corner  of  Ault  and  Farror  streets.  At 
present  Sister  Christine  is  the  Mother  Superior,  and  associated  with  her 
are  Sisters  Josephine,  Casimer,  Anunciata,  Alacoupue,  Elvira  and  Alexis. 
Sister  Alacoque  is  the  music  teacher;  the  other  branches  taught  are  the 
eight  grammar  grades  and  one  year  of  high  school  work.  The  building  is 
a  commodious  brick  structure,  and  excellent  work  is  done. 

The  school  in  connection  with  the  Immaculate  Conception  Church  was 
founded  by  Father  Straubinger,  in  1888.  This  school  prepares  its  pupils 
for  high  school.    It  is  well  attended  and  has  capable  teachers. 

LIBRARY. 

The  free  public  library  building  was  the  gift  of  Andrew  Carnegie. 
It  was  completed  in  1904  at  a  cost  of  $20,000,  and  is  supported  by  taxation 
and  kept  open  day  and  evening  six  days  in  the  week.  Mrs.  Bessie  Lee, 
librarian. 

This  institution  is  the  culmination  of  the  efforts  of  the  first  associa- 
tion, formed  in  1872,  whose  president  was  T.  P.  Whie ;  secretary,  William 
Maynard. 


186  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Through  varying  fortunes  and  under  different  names  library  organi- 
zations have  existed  from  that  time  to  the  present.  The  railvs^ay  employes 
took  a  leading  part.  In  the  fall  of  1900  the  Wabash  Railway  Company, 
which  had  been  giving  its  assistance,  withdrew  its  help  to  give  to  the  new 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  The  Railroad  Library  Club  then  faced  the  problem  of  sup- 
port and  for  advice  turned  to  G.  R.  Rothwell,  who  suggested  making 
use  of  the  new  state  law,  permitting  cities  to  maintain  public  libraries  by 
taxation.  This  was  favorably  received  and  a  committee  was  appointed,  con- 
sisting of  Messrs.  Rothwell,  Lowell  and  N.  E.  Walker,  to  manage  the  move- 
ment for  establishing  a  public  library.  The  matter  was  voted  on  April  2, 
1901,  and  the  tax  authorized. 

The  first  board  of  directors  under  the  new  law  consisted  of  Gus 
Ginther,  N.  E.  Walker,  J.  A.  Whiteford,  Dr.  J.  T.  Fry,  A.  B.  Ruby,  W.  D. 
Danley  and  F.  G.  Ferris. 

Of  the  Commercial  club  members  who  were  active  in  working  for  the 
Carnegie  building  may  be  mentioned,  President  J.  R.  Lowell,  Rolla  Roxh- 
well,  Dr.  C.  B.  Clapp,  John  O'Keefe,  L.  E.  Frost,  R.  A.  Curran,  E.  B. 
Mahan,  G.  J.  Ginther  and  Harvey  Baker. 

The  present  library  board :  President,  A.  B.  Rubey ;  secretary,  George 
H.  Robinson;  members,  P.  P.  Callaway,  Omar  Martin,  Arthur  O'Keefe, 
G.  P.  Eddings,  Claude  Marshall,  J.  C.  Lilly,  Dr.  C.  K.  Dutton.  Librarian, 
Bessie  S.  Lee. 

CONTRACT  WITH  RAILROAD  COMPANY. 

The  following  is  the  contract  entered  into  by  and  between  the  in- 
habitants of  the  town  of  Moberly,  Missouri,  and  the  St.  Louis,  Kansas 
City  &  Northern  Railway  Company,  and  locating  their  main  shops  at 
Moberly : 

This  contract,  made  and  entered  into  this day  of  April, 

A.  D.,  1872,  between  "The  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Moberly,  Mis- 
souri" of  the  lirst  part,  and  the  St.  Louis,  Kansas  City  and  Northern 
Railway  Company,  of  the  second  part,  witnesseth:  That  said  party 
of  the  first  part,  for  the  consideration  hereinafter  set  forth,  hereby 
binds  itself  to  make  a  perfect  title  in  fee  to  the  party  of  the  second 
part,  to  the  following  described  lands,  situate  in  the  county  of  Ran- 
dolph and  state  of  Missouri,  viz.:  All  of  the  land  now  belonging  to 
said  party  of  the  second  part  within  the  lines  as  marked  on  a  plat  filed 
in  the  office  of  the  attorney  of  said  party  of  the  second  part,  marked 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  187 

"Exhibit  A,"  and  designated  as  the  plat  here  referred  to  by  the  signa- 
ture of  William  A.  Hall,  which  said  land  is  north  of  said  town  of  Moberly 
.and  contiguous  thereto,  and  to  the  land  now  held  by  said  party  of  the 
second  part  and  is  between  the  main  line  and  the  west  branch  of  said 
railway,  and  also  six-hundred  and  eighteen  (618)  acres  on  the  west 
branch  of  said  railway,  as  designated  on  said  plat,  about  one  and  a 
half  miles  west  of  said  land  first  above  described,  subject  to  a  coal 
lease  on  two  hundred  acres,  on  the  west  part  if  said  land — (the  rents 
and  profits  of  which  shall  enure  to  the  said  party  of  the  second  part) 
all  of  which  appears  on  the  said  plat,  and  said  party  of  the  first  part, 
in  consideration,  etc.,  as  aforesaid,  further  binds  itself  to  pay  any  and 
all  taxes  that  may  be  levied  by  the  authorities  of  said  town  of  Moberly, 
on  the  property  now  owned,  and  on  the  property  to  be  conveyed  under 
this  contract,  by  said  party  of  the  first  part  to  said  party  of  the  second 
part,  for  the  period  of  twenty  years  from  and  after  this  date;  and 
if  any  other  municipal  corporation  shall  be  created  to  cover  said  lands, 
the  said  party  of  the  first  part  binds  itself  nevertheless  to  pay  any  and 
all  tovsTi  or  municipal  taxes  that  may  be  levied,  or  assessed  by  such 
municipal  corporation  so  created,  on  the  said  property  now  owned  and 
which  is  to  be  conveyed  to  said  party  of  the  second  part,  as  aforesaid, 
for  the  period  of  twenty  years. 

And  said  party  of  the  first  part  further  binds  itself  that  no  roads, 
streets  or  alleys  shall  be  made  over,  through  or  across  the  said  lands  to 
be  conveyed  by  them  to  the  said  party  of  the  second  part,  adjoining  said 
town  without  the  consent  of  said  company,  and  that  said  party  of  the 
first  part  will  have  vacated  any  streets  or  alleys  which  may  now  be 
located  on  said  lands,  and  binds  itself  that  it  will  forever  oppose  any 
extension  of  the  corporate  limits  of  the  said  town  of  Moberly  over  the 
said  land  to  be  conveyed  by  said  party  of  the  first  to  the  said  party  of 
the  second  part,  adjoining  the  said  town,  and  further,  that  it,  the  said 
party  of  the  first  part  will  not  accept  any  law  authorizing  any  extension 
of  the  corporate  limits  of  said  town  that  will  include  the  property  referred 
to  in  this  agreement  without  the  consent  of  the  said  party  of  the  sec- 
ond part,  and  said  party  of  the  first  part  further  binds  itself  to  per- 
fect the  title  in  fee  to  said  party  of  the  second  part,  and  deliver  pos- 
session of  the  lands  adjoining  the  town  as  above  described  in  ten  days, 
except  so  much  as  has  belonged  to  a  minor  heir  which  shall  be  per- 
fected in  forty-five  days,  and  that  it  will  perfect  the  title  to  the  six 


188  HISTORY   OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY 

hundred  and  eighteen  acre  tract  subject  to  the  coal  lease  in.  thirty 
days,  and  that  it  will  have  vacated  the  streets  and  alleys  on  said  land 
adjoining  town  in  ninety  days.  In  consideration  whereof  said  party 
of  the  second  part  hereby  binds  itself  to  said  party  of  the  first  part 
to  permanently  locate  their  principal  car  and  machine  shops  within  the 
limits  of  the  land  adjoining  said  town  of  Moberly,  to  be  conveyed  by 
said  party  of  the  first  part  to  the  said  party  of  the  second  part,  as 
shown  by  the  plat  referred  to. 

In  testimony  whereof,  the  said  party  of  the  first  part  has  caused 
this  contract  to  be  signed  by  the  chairman  of  the  board  of  trustees  of 
the  town  of  Moberly,  and  the  seal  of  said  coi-poration  to  be  hereunto 
affixed,  and  the  said  party  of  the  second  part  has  caused  the  same  to 
be  signed  by  its  president,  and  its  corporate  seal  be  hereunto  affixed  on 
the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

B.  Y.  N.  CLARKSON,     ■ 

Chairman  of  Board  of  Trustees,  of  the  Town  of  Moberly,  Missouri. 
Attest : 

In  Witness  Whereof,  I,  J.  W.  Dorser,  clerk  of  the  board  of  trustees, 
of  said  town  of  Moberly,  do  hereby  affix  my  name  and  the  corporate 
seal  of  said  town  of  Moberly,  at  office  in  said  town,  this  second  day 
of  April,  A.  D.,  1872. 

J.  W.  DORSER, 

Clerk. 
(L.  S.) 
St.  Louis,  Kansas  City  &  Northern  Railway  Co. 

By  T.  B.  BLACKSTONE,  President. 
(L.  S.)  Corporate  Seal. 
Attest : 

JAMES  F.  HOW,  Secretary. 

CITIZENS'  BOND  FOR  THE  FAITHFUL  PERFORMANCE  OF  SHOPS 

CONTRACT. 
Know  All  Men  By  These  Presents,  That  we,  H.  M.  Porter,  J.  H. 
Burkholder,  T.  P.  White,  M.  Jennings,  E.  H.  Miller,  0.  F.  Chandler, 
John  T.  Young,  D.  B.  White,  I.  B.  Porter,  William  Firth,  N.  B.  Coates, 
S.  P.  McCormick,  Henry  Morgan,  B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson,  William  Seelen, 
W.  D.  Pegram,  John  B.  Freeman,  Adam  Given,  S.  Jones,  B.  F.  Porter, 
J.  T.  Aldridge,  C.  Fiser,  Erwin  Gay,  C.  W.  Dawson,  C.  Otto,  P.  H.  Nise, 
George  T.  Goldsmith,  N.  B.  Coates,  W.  F.  Bowman,  hereby  bind  our- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  189 

selves,  our  heirs,  etc.,  to  the  St.  Louis,  Kansas  City  &  Northern  Rail- 
way Company  in  the  sum  of  one  hundred  tfiousand  dollars,  upon  the 
terms  and  conditions  following,  to-wit: 

Whereas,  The  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Moberly,  in  Randolph 
County,  Missouri,  have  submitted  a  proposition  to  the  said  railroad  com- 
pany for  the  purpose  of  inducing  and  assisting  said  company  to  locate 
on  lands  donated  to  said  company  by  said  town,  adjoining  said  town 
on  the  north,  their  principal  car  and  machine  shops  of  said  company. 
And  said  town  also  proposes  to  and  donated  to  said  company,  six  hun- 
dred and  eighteen  acres  on  the  line  of  the  west  branch  of  said  road, 
known  as  the  Horner  farm. 

And  Whereas,  The  said  company  has  duly  accepted  said  proposi- 
tion of  the  said  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Moberly;  now,  therefore,  if 
said  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Moberly  shall  furnish  to,  or  cause  to  be 
furnished  to,  said  company,  a  good  and  complete  title  in  fee  simple  to 
all  of  the  lands  named  in  said  proposition,  subject,  however,  to  the  coal 
lease  therein  mentioned,  then  this  bond  to  be  void,  otherwise  to  remain 
in  full  force  and  virtue. 

In  witness  whereof,  we  have  hereunto  subscribed  our  hands  and 
seals  this  first  day  of  April,  A.  D.  1872. 

GEO.  W;  DULANY,  M.  B.  PEGRAM, 

J.  P.  MILLER,  ADAM  GIVEN, 

J.  W.  BURKHOLDER,  S.  JONES, 

S.  P.  McCORMICK,  B.  T.  PORTER, 

0.  F.  CHANDLER,  JOHN  T.  ALDRIDGE, 

D.  B.  WHITE,  CHAS.  TISUE, 

1.  B.  PORTER,  ERWIN  GAY, 

E.  H.  MILLER,  C.  W.  DAWSON, 
H.  M.  PORTER,  CHRISTIAN  OTTO, 
B.  Y.  N.  CLARKSON,  P.  H.  NISE, 
WILLIAM  FIRTH,  GEO.  T.  GOLDSMITH, 
JOHN  T.  YOUNG,  N.  B.  COATES, 

M.  JENNINGS,  W.  F.  BARROWS, 

W.  P.  WHITE,  C.  FISHER. 

J.  B.  FREEMAN, 
Filed  for  record  July  20th,  1889,  at  1:00  o'clock  p.  m. 

J.   C.  SAMUEL, 
Recorder. 
JNO.  N.  HAMILTON,  Deputy  Recorder. 


190  HISTORY   OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY 

FROM  MOBERLY'S  FIRST  NEWSPAPER. 

The  Moberly  Herald  was  Moberly's  first  newspaper,  published  un 
the  first  day  of  each  month,  by  W.  E.  Grimes.  The  first  issue  appeared 
on  Wednesday,  March  10,  1869.  The  following  is  taken  from  the  sec- 
ond issue: 

OFFICERS  OF  THE  TOWN. 

Trustees:  A.  T.  Franklin,  president;  Chas.  L.  Brandt,  Asa  Bennett, 
Wm.  Seelen.  Marshal,  Martin  Howlett.  Justice  of  the  peace,  E.  Sidner. 
Constable,  Chas.  Featherston.  Notary  public,  W.  E.  Grimes.  Post- 
master, C.  Tisue.     Merchants'  Union  Express  Agent,  C.  Tisue. 

MOBERLY  BUSINESS  DIRECTORY. 
J.  J.  &  G.  W.  Jones,  Dry  Goods,  Etc.,  Coates  Street,  East  of  Railroad. 
T.  P.  White,  Dry  Goods,  Clothing,  Etc.,  Comer  Clark  and  Reed  Streets. 
Mrs.  Foose,  Milliner,  South  Side  Reed  Street.  Mrs.  E.  Werden,  Milliner, 
North  Side  Reed  Street.  Berry  &  Harmon,  Family  Groceries,  Clark 
Street.  E.  H.  Miller,  Grocery  and  Bakery,  Sturgeon  Street.  H.  Over- 
berg,  Meat  Market,  Reed  Street.  Wm.  Seelen,  Hardware  and  Cutlery, 
Reed  Street.  B.  Y.  N.  Clarkson,  Reapers,  Mowers  and  Threshers,  Reed 
Street.  Chandler  &  Adams,  Druggists,  Comer  Reed  and  Clark  Streets. 
L.  Brandt,  Boots  and  Shoes,  Corner  Reed  and  Sturgeon  Streets.  Wm.  E. 
^Grimes,  Real  Estate,  South  Side  Reed  Street.  J.  D.  Werden,  Real  Estate 
and  Insurance,  Reed  Street.  I.  B.  Porter,  Attorney  at  Law,  Real  Estate 
and  Insurance  Agent,  Reed  Street.  North  Missouri  Coal  &  Mining  Com- 
pany, Stui'geon  Street.  J.  S.  Clarkson  &  Company,  Fruit  Trees,  Hedge 
and  Shrubbery,  Reed  Street.  E.  H.  Petering,  Lumber,  Coates  Street. 
True  &  Briggs,  Contractors  and  Builders,  Clark  Street.  Joseph  Anson, 
Carpenter  and  Builder,  Williams  Street.  W.  K.  Christian,  Resident  Den- 
tist, Residence,  Fifth  Street.  Dr.  J.  C.  Tedford,  Physician,  Coates  Street. 
Dr.  C.  Adams,  Physician,  Corner  Clark  and  Reed  Streets.  Tate's  Hotel, 
S.  P.  Tate,  Proprietor,  Corner  Clark  and  Reed  Streets.  Wm.  Teeters, 
Restaurant,  Reed  Street.  0.  N.  Kaan,  Barber  and  Hair  Dresser,  Reed 
Street.  Manlin  &  Co.,  Saloon,  Southwest  Corner  Reed  and  Sturgeott 
Streets.  P.  McLarney,  Moberly  Saloon,  Sturgeon  Street.  J.  D.  Bailey, 
Carpenter  and  Builder,  Williams  Street.  J.  H.  McQuaid,  Lumber  Dealer, 
Moulton  Street,  East  of  Railroad. 

NEW  FIRM— NEW  GOODS— NEW  PRICES. 
T.  P.  White  having  purchased  the  stock  of  goods  of  Tate  &  Bennett, 
will  continue  the  business  at  their  old  stand,  under  Tate's  Hotel,  Moberly, 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  191 

Missouri.  He  is  now  purchasing  and  will  bring  to  this  city  the  largest 
and  most  complete  assortment  of  Dry  Goods,  Notions,  Hats,  Clothing, 
Groceries  and  Queensware. 

"THE  WAR  IS  OVER  AT  LAST." 
I  have  a  house  and  lot  in  Moberly,  Missouri,  which  I  would  sell. 
Located  on  Williams  street  only  two  blocks  from  the  depot.  Lot,  fifty 
foot  front,  running  back  120  feet.  Good  fence,  cistern,  etc.  House  con- 
tains three  good  rooms,  and  would  rent  for  about  $15.00  per  month. 
Price,  $1,000.     Title  perfect.— J.  D.  Bailey. 

FOR  SALE. 

Two  hundred  and  fifty-six  acres  of  good  land,  lying  two  and  a  half 
miles  east  of  Jacksonville,  ninety  acres  in  cultivation,  balance  in  timber. 
Improvements  consist  of  a  double  log  house,  two  stories  high,  stable, 
etc.,  never  failing  water,  saw-mill  and  carding  machine  within  one  mile. 
Price  $12.50  per  acre. 

A  farm  of  105  acres  in  Monroe  County,  lying  within  three  and  a  half 
miles  of  Middle  Grove  and  about  the  same  distance  from  Madison.  Im- 
provements consist  of  a  frame  house  containing  four  rooms,  stables 
moderately  good,  smokehouses  and  other  out-buildings,  good  water,  a 
young  orchard  of  select  fruit,  seventy  acres  of  farm  in  cultivation,  re- 
mainder in  pasture  and  timber.     Price,  $22.50  per  acre. 

Twenty-two  acres  of  unimproved  prairie  land,  lying  within  one-half 
mile  of  Moberly.     Price,  $40.00  per  acre. 

A  large  and  commodious  hotel  in  the  flourishing  town  of  Renick; 
building  new,  two-story  frame,  30x40  feet,  with  fifteen  rooms.  Situated 
near  depot,  doing  a  good  business.     Price,  $2,000. 

THE  HANNIBAL  AND  MOBERLY  RAILROAD. 
Mr.  Mclnally,  one  of  the  gentlemanly  contractors  of  the  Hannibal 
and  Moberly  Railroad,  informs  us  that  at  present  they  are  working  about 
one  hundred  hands  on  that  part  of  the  road  that  lies  between  this  place 
and  Paris,  a  distance  of  twenty-four  miles,  and  that  the  whole  line  is 
being  pushed  to  an  early  completion.  So  we  may  reasonably  conclude 
that  within  a  year  the  quiet  citizens  of  Paris  will  be  startled  by  the  shrill 
whistle  of  the  locomotive.  The  iron  is  already  being  laid  down  on  the 
Naples  and  Hannibal  Railroad,  and  when  finished  will  fill  a  gap  in  the 
most  important  direct  line  of  road  across  the  continent. 


CHAPTER  XVII 


TOWNSHIPS,  CONTINUED. 
HUNTSVILLE  AND  SALT  SPRING  TOWNSHIP. 


SALT  SPRING  TOWNSHIP.  HUNTSVILLE:  LOCATION  OF  COUNTr  SEAT — NAMED 
AFTER  DANIEL  HUNT,  ONE  OF  THE  DONORS — OTHER  DONORS— FIRST  SALE 
OP  LOTS — PIONEER  BUSINESSMEN — EXTRACT  FROM  MISSOURI  GAZETTE- 
FIRST  LODGES— FIRST  CHURCH  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOL— OPERA  HOUSE— TOWN 
INCORPORATED — FIRST  MAYOR — PUBLIC  SCHOOL — CITY  AND  SCHOOL  OFFI- 
CERS— TEACHERS — MT.  PLEASANT  COLLEGE  —  OFFICERS  —  FIRST  FAIR  — 
LIBRARY — FIRST   COURT    HOUSE — SECOND    COURT    HOUSE. 

Salt  Spring  is  one  of  the  original  four  townships  of  Randolph  County, 
and  is  one  of  the  most  wealthy,  populous,  and  influential  of  the  eleven 
townships  into  which  the  county  is  now  divided.  It  also  has  the  dis- 
tinction of  being  the  capital  township,  Huntsville,  the  county  seat,  being 
within  its  limits.  Geographically,  Salt  Spring  is  almost  central  to  the 
county  boundaries,  and  contains  31,040  acres. 

Topographically,  the  lands  of  this  township  are  gently  undulating, 
assuring  fine  drainage,  and  are  of  every  desirable  adaptation,  whether 
for  pasturage  and  the  various  grasses,  or  the  more  active  cultivation  of 
wheat,  corn,  rye,  oats,  potatoes  and  the  several  root  crops. 

It  can  hardly  be  said  with  propriety  that  the  township  contains  any 
prairie  lands  proper.  In  the  matter  of  timber  and  woodlands  it  was 
richly  provided,  about  one-third  of  its  acreage  being  clothed  with  forests 
of  white,  red,  black,  burr,  swamp  and  pin  oak,  hickory,  walnut,  maple, 
elm  and  sycamore. 

As  will  readily  be  conjectured,  the  township  name.  Salt  Spring,  has 
a  local  significance.     It  is  so  called  from  the  existence  within  its  limits. 


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PLTBLIC  LIBRARY,  HUNTSVILLB,  MO. 


PUBLIC    SCHOOL,   HUNTSVILLE,    KG. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  193 

and  some  three  miles  southwest  of  Huntsville,  on  the  Hne  of  the  Wabash 
Railway,  of  a  salt  spring,  or  well,  of  considerable  volume,  at  which,  in 
the  early  history  of  the  county,  the  pioneer  settlers,  by  primitive  pro- 
cesses, manufactured  their  supplies  of  salt.  The  first  systematized  salt 
works  at  this  place  were  established  and  operated  by  Dr.  William  Fort, 
at  a  very  early  day,  who  not  only  supplied  the  demand  of  the  region  im- 
mediately round  about,  but  who  also  sent  large  supplies  of  salt  to  various 
points  on  the  Mississippi  and  elsewhere  equally  remote. 

It  is  amongst  the  traditions  of  the  people,  that,  at  an  early  day,  this 
spring,  or  well,  served  not  alone  the  purposes  mentioned,  but  was  then, 
as  it  is  now  reputed  to  be,  a  fountain  of  healing,  in  the  use  of  whose 
waters  health  and  rejuvenation  came  to  many  hapless  victims  to  acute 
and  chronic  rheumatism,  and  other  kindred  physical  ailments. 

This  township  is  also  well  supplied  with  water,  having  the  East  fork 
of  the  Chariton  River,  with  Its  several  small  tributaries,  cutting  it  almost 
centrally  from  the  northeast  to  the  southwest,  and  with  Sweet  Spring 
creek  flowing  along  its  entire  southern  boundary.  Of  flowing  springs 
there  are  but  few,  wells  and  cisterns  being  relied  upon  for  drinking  and 
general  domestic  purposes. 

Salt  Spring  township  is  rich  in  coal  beyond  its  sister  townships  of 
the  county;  and  from  this  source  is  now,  and  for  several  years  past,  has 
been  realizing  much  profit.  Of  well  developed  coal  workings,  there  are 
several  prosperous  mines  in  the  township  which  produce  large  quantities 
of  coal  and  give  employment  to  hundreds  of  men. 

The  oldest  coal  banks  were  opened  by  J.  C.  Chapman  and  David 
Reece.  G.  W.  Taylor,  I.  Cook,  William  Mitchell,  J.  A.  Stewart,  and 
Anderson  &  Co.  had  drift  mines  at  an  early  day. 

John  Sutliff  operated  a  woolen  mill  here  in  the  early  days  and  there 
were  three  tobacco  factories  in  Huntsville.  Two  of  these  were  owned 
by  W.  T.  Rutherford  and  E.  E.  Samuel,  Jr.,  and  the  other  by  Miss  Bernice 
Morrison,  of  St.  Louis.  HuntsviUe  was  the  second  largest  leaf  tobacco 
market  in  the  State,  and  generally  shipped  from  two  and  a  half  to  three 
millions  of  pounds  per  annum. 

The  first  settlers  of  Salt  Spring  township  were  generally  from  Ken- 
tucky, as  will  be  seen  from  the  list  of  names  given  below:  From  Ken- 
tucky came  Henry  Lassiter,  Henry  Winbum,  Valentine  Mays,  Neal  Mur- 
phy, Clark  Skinner,  Benjamin  Skinner,  Joseph  M.  Hammett,  William  Fray, 
Blandermin  Smith,  Robert  Sconce,  William  Baker,  Charles  Baker,  Joseph 


194  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

M.  Baker,  Christly  Baker,  Jeremiah  Summers,  Archibald  Rutherford, 
William  Rutherford  and  Shelton  Rutherford.  John  Read  came  from 
North  Carolina.  Tolman  Gorham  came  from  Tennessee,  as  did  also 
Thomas  Gorham,  Sr.,  Thomas  J.  Gorham  and  Dr.  William  Fort.  James 
Cochrane,  John  Welden,  Jeremiah  Summers,  William  Elliott,  Robert 
Elliott,  Joseph  Holman,  William  Cunningham  and  Abraham  Goodding  were 
other  early  settlers. 

Dr.  William  Fort,  above  named,  together  with  Tolman  Gorham, 
opened  and  operated  the  salt  works,  which  were  then  located  at  what 
is  now  known  as  the  Medical  Springs,  in  Randolph  County.  They  began 
making  salt  in  1823,  and  continued  to  supply  a  wide  scope  of  country, 
extending  many  miles  in  almost  every  direction,  for  many  years. 

The  doctor  was  the  first  physician  to  locate  in  the  county,  and  being 
one  of  the  oldest  citizens  of  the  county,  we  here  insert  the  following 
which  was  published  at  the  time  of  his  death: 

Another  of  the  strong  and  notable  men  of  the  pioneer  life  of  Mis- 
souri has  been  called  to  his  reward  in  the  person  of  Dr.  William  Fort,  ■ 
of  Randolph  County,  who  died  at  the  residence  of  his  son,  Henry  T.  Fort, 
near  Huntsville,  without  a  struggle,  and  from  exhaustion  and  old  age, 
on  August  23,  1881,  aged  88  years. 

The  deceased  was  born  in  Nashville,  Tennessee,  October  19,  1793, 
and  was  a  soldier  in  the  War  of  1812,  under  Gen.  Jackson.  After  the 
close  of  the  war  and  on  March  14,  1815,  he  niarried  Miss  Patsy  Gorham, 
who  with  four  of  their  six  children  survive  him. 

In  1817  he  professed  religion  and  united  with  the  Baptist  church. 

In  1820,  a  year  before  the  state  was  admitted  into  the  Union,  he 
emigrated  with  his  young  family  to  Missouri  and  settled  in  Randolph 
County  and  on  the  farm  on  which  he  was  buried. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  first  county  court  of  Randolph  County,  and 
during  his  life  was  elevated  by  his  fellow-citizens  to  seats  in  both  branches 
of  the  General  Assembly,  always  discharging  his  official  trusts,  as  he  did 
his  personal  and  professional  obligations,  with  fidelity,  promptness  and 
great  acceptance  to  the  people,  aiding  in  all  the  relations  of  life  in  laying 
the  foundations  of  the  great  Commonwealth  of  which  he  was  always  so 
justly  proud. 

He  was  a  Democrat  of  the  school  of  Jefferson  and  Jackson  and  dur- 
ing the  latter  years  of  Senator  Benton's  career,  a  leader  in  the  state  of 
the  anti-Benton  forces  and  contributed  not  a  little  by  his  influence  in  the 
final  overthrow  of  Benton's  power  in  Missouri. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  195 

Dr.  Fort  was  a  man  of  the  most  exemplary  private  life;  took  the 
right  side  of  all  the  moral  questions  of  the  day,  and  being  fearless  as 
well  as  discreet  in  the  proclamation  of  his  opinion,  left  the  world  the 
better  that  he  had  lived  in  it.  Decided  in  his  convictions  of  public  policy, 
he  was  conservative  without  being  tame  and  tolerant  of  opinions  differ- 
ing from  his  own.  In  short,  he  was  a  strong  character  and  has  left  his 
impress  on  his  generation. 

By  profession  he  was  a  physician  and  for  many  years  his  practice 
was  very  successful  and  extensive. 

William  Fray  erected  the  first  water  mill  in  Salt  Spring  township, 
on  the  East  fork  of  the  Chariton  River. 

HUNTS  VILLE. 

Huntsville  is  well  located  upon  an  elevated  and  healthful  plateau,  on 
the  north  side  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  on  sections  25  and  36,  just  a  little 
west  of  the  center  of  the  county. 

On  the  5th  of  January,  1831,  the  first  steps  were  taken  towards 
locating  the  county  seat  at  Huntsville,  by  the  appointment  of  Robert  Wil- 
son, commissioner.  The  tract  or  tracts  which  comprised  the  original 
town  site  were  donated  to  the  county  by  William  Goggin,  Gideon  Wright, 
Daniel  Hunt  and  Henry  Winbum,  and  the  county  surveyor  was  immedi- 
ately ordered  to  lay  off  the  land  and  make  a  plat  thereof.  Each  of  these 
donations  consisted  of  121/4  acres,  which  formed  an  exact  square,  the 
dome  of  the  court  house  being  the  centre. 

Daniel  Hunt,  one  of  the  donors  above  named,  was  the  first  settler, 
locating,  however,  but  a  little  while  in  advance  of  the  other  three.  These 
men  were  from  Kentucky.  The  town  was  called  Huntsville  in  honor  of 
Daniel  Hunt,  the  first  settler. 

The  first  sale  of  lots  took  place  in  the  follovdng  April  and  included! 
all  of  them  with  the  exception  of  those  from  number  94  to  99  inclusive,, 
reserved  for  court  house,  lot  155  for  jatl  lot,  and  also  nurnber  32,  which 
it  was  then  thought  necessary  to  hold  back  for  a  market  house.  The 
market  house  lot  was  subsequently  sold.  The  highest  price  then  paid 
for  lots  was  $115.  Some  of  the  lots  sold  as  low  as  $3.25,  which  are  very 
valuable  property  now. 

The  original  town  site  of  Huntsville  was  doubtless  covered  with 
timber,  judging  from  the  following  order  which  was  made  by  the  ajunty 
court  when  the  town  was  located: 


196  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Ordered:  That  all  persons  cutting  timber  in  the  streets  of  Hunts- 
ville  are  required  to  leave  the  stumps  not  more  than  one  foot  in  height, 
and  to  clear  all  timber  so  cut,  together  with  the  brush. 

The  pioneer  business  men  of  Huntsville  were  Davis  and  Currin,  to 
whom  were  issued  the  first  tavern  license,  granted  by  the  county  court 
in  1829.  Their  place  of  business  was  at  the  house  of  William  Goggin, 
Daniel  G.  Davis  and  Waddy  T.  Currin.  The  next  merchants  were  Garth 
and  Giddings,  Dabney  C.  Gartha  and  Brack  Giddings.  These  gentlemen 
were  from  Virginia.     Garth  represented  the  county  in  the  Legislature. 

Then  came  Fielding,  Clinton  and  Grundy  Cockerill,  who  did  a  gen- 
eral merchandise  business  under  the  firm  name  of  Cockerill  &  Co.  Joseph 
C.  Dameron  commenced  the  mercantile  business  in  the  spring  of  1835, 
and  in  1842  he  brought  the  first  piano  to  the  county,  its  strange  and  in- 
spiring notes  being  the  first  ever  heard  among  the  classic  hills  of  Hunts- 
ville. 

Conway  and  Lamb  were  among  the  earliest  merchants.  John  F. 
Riley  was  the  first  gunsmith;  0.  D.  Carlisle  was  the  first  saddler;  John 
Gray  taught  the  first  school  in  a  log  house  located  on  the  public  square; 
James  C.  Ferguson  was  the  first  shoemaker;  Dr.  Waller  Head  was  the 
first  physician  to  locate  in  the  town.  He  was  a  native  of  Orange  County, 
Virginia,  and  located  in  Huntsville  in  October,  1831,  where  he  continued 
to  reside  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  August,  1845.  Dr.  Joseph 
Rutherford  came  soon  after  Head  and  formed  a  partnership  in  the  prac- 
tice of  medicine  with  the  latter. 

Ned.  Goggin  (colored)  opened  the  first  bakery  and  after  accumu- 
lating quite  a  fortune,  he  moved  to  Putnam  County,  Missouri.  Joseph 
Viley  erected  the  first  carding  machine  and  cotton  gin  in  1834.  Joseph 
C.  Dameron  opened  the  first  tobacco  factory.  Dr.  J.  J.  Watts  kept  the 
first  drug  store;  William  Smith  the  first  livery  stable.  Gen.  Robert  Wil- 
son was  the  first  lawyer  in  the  town.  He  was  also  the  first  county  and 
circuit  court  clerk,  and  afterwards  became  a  United  States  Senator  from 
Missouri.  Clair  Oxley,  from  Kentucky,  was  the  second  lawyer;  he  after- 
wards died  in  Santa  Fe,  New  Mexico.  William  Goggin  erected  the  first 
mill  in  the  town  at  a  very  early  day.  It  was  a  horse  mill  and  was  oper- 
ated for  nearly  35  years. 

Almost  simultaneously  with  the  founding  of  the  new  town,  a  few  of 
the  old  settlers,  anxious  to  amuse  themselves,  opened  a  race  track  near 
the  northwestern  portion  of  the  town.     Here  met  the  sporting  men  and 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  197 

lovers  of  the  turf  for  several  years,  drawn  hither  at  stated  periods  to 
witness  the  speed  of  some  strange  or  favorite  horse.  Among  the  horses 
whose  popularity  has  come  down  to  us  were  "White  Stockings"  and 
"Aleck"  the  former  the  property  of  Bart  McDameron  and  the  latter  the 
property  of  Hancock  Jackson.  In  1837  Alphonso  Wetmore,  the  compiler 
of  the  "Gazetteer"  of  Missouri,  said  of  Huntsville  at  that  date: 

Huntsville,  the  seat  of  justice  of  Randolph,  is  near  the  center  of 
the  county.  This  town  is  flourishing  and  contains  a  good  brick  court- 
house, seven  stores,  etc.  There  is  no  church  in  the  place,  but  public 
worship  by  all  denominations  is  held  in  the  court  house  and  in  the  school 
houses  of  tiie  town  and  county.  This  is  a  fashion  throughout  Missouri 
and  it  seems  rational  to  occupy  one  house  for  various  purposes  in  a  new 
.  country.  While  the  people  are  building  up  their  fortunes  and  erecting 
private  houses  at  the  same  time  there  should  be  indulgence  given  until 
they  shall  be  better  able  to  build  temples  suited  in  magnificence  to  the 
great  Being  to  whom  these  will  be  dedicated. 

The  first  banking  enterprise  in  Huntsville  was  inaugurated  about 
the  year  1866  by  William  M.  Wisdom  and  Courtney  Hughes.  It  was 
a  private  institution  and  continued  until  the  death  of  Mr.  Hughes,  which 
occurred  in  1867.  The  bank  then  did  business  under  the  name  of  C. 
Wisdom  &  Co.,  until  December  31,  1874,  when  it  was  succeeded  by  the 
Huntsville  Savings  Bank,  The  bank  was  again  changed  in  1878,  to  the 
private  bank  of  J.  M.  Hammett  &  Co.,  with  the  following  directors  and 
stockholders:  F.  M.  Hammett,  president;  James  W.  Hammett,  vice- 
president;  C.  H.  Hammett,  cashier;  B.  F.  Hammett,  J.  D.  Hammett,  W.  R. 
Samuel,  M.  J.  Sears,  John  R.  Christian. 

Huntsville  Lodge  No.  30,  A.  F.  and  A.  M.  was  chartered  by  the 
Grand  Lodge  of  Missouri,  October  8,  1840.  The  following  are  the  only 
three  names  of  the  charter  members  that  appear  upon  the  records :  Ed- 
ward Slater,  Fleming  Terrill,  Thomas  P.  Coates. 

Randolph  Lodge  No.  23,  I.  0.  0.  F.  was  chartered  April  29,  1847, 
and  organized  and  officers  installed  June  10,  1847,  by  Grand  Master  Isaac 
M.  Veitch,  of  St.  Louis,  assisted  by  Clark  H.  Green,  D.  D.  G.  M. 

The  Huntsville  Building  and  Loan  Association  was  chartered  Febru- 
ary 17,  1882.  The  first  ofl[icers  were  William  Sandison,  president;  T.  M. 
Elmore,  vice-pi-esident ;  C.  H.  Hammett,  treasurer;  J.  C.  Shaefer,  secre- 
tary. 


198  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  Huntsville  Missionary  Baptist  church  was  organized  at  the  house 
of  Zephaniah  Walden,  near  Huntsville,  in  August,  1837,  with  seven  con- 
stituent members :  Theophilus  Eddine,  Zephaniah  Walden  and  wife,  Mary 
Thomas,  Martha  Dameron,  Benjamin  Terrill  and  James  Terrill.  The  first 
church  house  in  the  town  was  erected  about  1840. 

The  first  additions  to  the  church  were  J.  C.  Shaefer  and  wife,  in 
September,  1837,  on  letters  of  commendation  from  the  Baptist  church 
at  Charlottesville,  Va. 

The  first  Sunday  school  in  the  town  or  county  was  organized  by 
J.  C.  Shaefer,  in  August,  1839,  and  has  been  successfully  carried  on  with- 
out intermission  to  the  present  time.  The  present  superintendent  is  W. 
R.  Samuel. 

Semple's  opera  house  was  finished  in  February,  1884,  and  was  the 
property  of  Charles  Semple. 

Huntsville  was  incorporated  March  12,  1859.  March  10,  1871,  the 
corporation  limits  were  extended. 

L.  S.  Barrad  was  the  first  mayor  and  held  his  office  in  1859. 

The  public  schools  were  partially  organized  in  Huntsville  some  little 
time  after  the  close  of  the  war,  but  the  organization  was  not  completed 
until  1877,  when  a  new  school  building  was  erected.  The  building  and 
grounds  cost  about  $3,500.  It  was  a  two-story  frame  structure  and  con- 
tains eight  rooms.  In  1877,  Prof.  M.  C.  McMellen  took  charge  of  the 
school  as  principal. 

Huntsville  has  in  recent  years  erected  a  splendid  modern  school 
building  which  is  an  imposing  brick  structure  with  all  modern  school 
appliances  and  equipment. 

The  Board  of  Education  is  as  follows:  President,  W.  C.  Smith; 
secretary,  W.  J.  Day;  treasurer,  W.  L.  Dameron;  superintendent  of 
schools,  J.  A.  Bumside;  members,  Dr.  D.  A.  Barnhart,  Callie  Halliburton, 
I.  B.  Jackson. 

The  Huntsville  High  School  teachers  are:  Principal,  Miss  Courtney 
Jackson;  teachers,  Miss  Sallie  Pattison,  Miss  Frances  Robinson,  Miss 
Ollie  Woodward,  Miss  Moselle  Densmore. 

The  grade  schools  teachers  are:  1st  grade.  Miss  Nora  Kiernan; 
2nd  grade.  Miss  Geraldine  Hammett;  3rd  grade,  Miss  Karleen  Singleton; 
4th  grade,  Mrs.  Lestal  Harns;  5th  grade.  Miss  Velva  Dunivent;  6th 
grade.  Miss  Esther  Davies;  7th  grade,  Miss  Anna  Pattison;  8th  grade, 
Miss  Sarah  Rutherford. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  199 

In  1853  the  citizens  of  Randolph  County,  impressed  with  the  need 
of  an  institution  of  learning,  and  wishing  to  secure  to  themselves  its 
benefits,  determined  to  erect  suitable  buildings  at  a  cost  of  not  less  than 
$10,000.  Acting  on  the  advice  of  Hon.  William  A.  Hall,  to  put  the  institu- 
tion under'  the  care  and  patronage  of  Mount  Pleasant  Baptist  Association, 
a  letter  stating  the  above  proposal,  signed  by  William  A.  Hall,  H.  Austin 
and  P.  P.  Ruby,  in  behalf  of  the  citizens  of  Randolph  County,  was  ad- 
dressed to  and  accepted  by  the  Association,  and  the  institution  took  the 
name  of  the  Association.  Under  this  arrangement  the  money  was 
secured  and  the  building  erected.  February  28,  1855,  the  charter  was 
obtained.  In  1857,  the  building  having  been  completed  at  a  cost  of 
$12,500,  and  a  school  of  170  pupils  under  Rev.  William  Thompson,  LL.  D., 
President,  and  Rev.  J.  H.  Carter,  A.  B.,  Professor  of  Mathematics,  and 
Miss  Bettie  Ragland,  Principal  of  female  department,  having  been  taught 
with  gratifying  results  one  year,  the  institution  was  formally  tendered 
by  the  board  of  trustees  to  the  Association  and  accepted ;  the  Association 
at  the  same  time  promising  to  endow  the  college  remotely  with  $25,000, 
and  within  two  years,  with  $10,000,  appointed  Rev.  Noah  Mood  to  pro- 
ceed at  once  to  secure  the  last  named  amount,  and  pledged  himself  to 
maintain  sufficient  and  efficient  teachers  until  the  $10,000  endowment  was 
secured.  Rev.  W.  R.  Rothwell  succeeded  Dr.  Thompson  in.  the  presidency 
and  the  college  ran  till  1861,  filling  the  most  sanguine  expectations  of  its 
friends.  President  Rothwell  gathered  quite  an  extensive  library,  provided 
apparatus  for  chemical,  philosophical  and  astronomical  purposes,  secured 
a  considerable  cabinet  of  minerals  and  fossils  and  established  the  char- 
acter and  reputation  of  the  college.  The  War  of  1861  crippled  the  re- 
sources of  the  school,  by  cutting  off  students,  and  a  deficit  of  $580  in 
teachers'  salaries  was  imposed,  which  failing  to  be  met  by  the  Associa- 
tion, the  trustees  of  the  college  let  It  to  President  Rothwell,  who,  at  his 
own  risk,  and  mainly  by  his  own  effort,  carried  the  college  through  the 
clouds  of  war  into  the  sunshine  of  1868.  The  school  which  had  hitherto 
been  self-sustaining,  or  carried  by  the  magnanimity  of  President  Roth- 
well to  1866,  now  being  cut  down  by  the  impoverished  and  unsettled  state 
of  the  country,  made  a  move  for  an  endowment  a  necessity,  and  the  call 
became  imperative.  The  board  of  trustees  at  Mount  Gilead  church  in 
1866,  with  emphasis  called  upon  the  Association  to  redeem  her  past 
pledges  for  endowment. 


200  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Y.  R.  Pitts  and  Wade  M.  Jackson  were  appointed  solicitors  to  raise 
$10,000  in  twelve  months.  The  next  year  (1868)  the  Association  at 
Keytesville,  through  Y.  R.  Pitts,  reported  as  endowment: 

In  notes   $  5,640.50 

In  cash 200.00 

Jerry  Kingsberry  bequest 2,500.00 

Balance  unprovided  for 1,660.00 


$10,000.50 

The  balance,  $1,660,  was  raised  by  subscription  at  that  sitting  of 
the  Association. 

In  1870,  Mount  Pleasant  Association,  wishing  further  to  endow  the 
college  and  learning  that  Macon  Association  was  contemplating  building 
a  similar  institution  of  learning  at  Macon  City,  in  the  adjoining  county, 
and  within  30  miles  of  Huntsville,  proposed  to  Macon  Association  to 
consolidate  upon  Mount  Pleasant  College,  offering  them  first,  one-half 
of  the  board  of  trustees  and  second,  requiring  them  to  raise  $5,000  to  be 
blended  with  the  endowment  fund.  W.  R.  Rothwell,  Benjamin  Terrill, 
Joshua  W.  Terrill,  W.  R.  Samuel  and  W.  T.  Beckelheimer  were  appointed 
a  committee  with  discretionary  power  to  confer  with  Macon  Association. 
In  1872,  Macon  Association  having  canvassed  her  ability  to  build,  and  the 
proposal  of  Mount  Pleasant  Association,  agreed  by  resolution  to  co- 
operate with  Mount  Pleasant  Association  in  building  up  Mount  Pleasant 
College,  when  the  committee  from  Mount  Pleasant  Association  guaranteed 
them  one-half  of  the  board  of  trustees  except  one,  leaving  a  majority  of 
the  board  in  Mount  Pleasant  Association.  In  1869,  Rev.  James  W.  Terrill 
succeeded  President  Rothwell.  The  war  being  over,  confidence  restored, 
and  the  times  being  prosperous  and  inviting,  the  college  with  other  enter- 
prises, took  new  life.  Added  to  this.  President  Terrill  brought  to  the 
institution  a  combination  of  merit,  enterprise  and  energy,  rarely  found 
in  one  man,  and  in  producing  a  new,  popular  and  successful  method  of 
teaching,  carried  the  college  to  its  highest  point  of  success.  The  ques- 
tion of  repaii's,  additions  and  betterments  (for  the  building  had  been  used 
for  military  quarters  during  the  war)  now  arose,  and  the  terms,  patron- 
age and  success  of  the  school,  and  the  earnest  protestations  of  both 
Mount  Pleasant  and  Macon  Associations,  seemed  to  demand  and  encour- 
age immediate  action  in  this  direction.  The  trustees  concluded  to  make 
ample  improvement  and  additions,  and  to  the  main  building  added  two 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  201 

wings,  running  out  and  back  of  the.  main  building,  giving  in  rooms,  halls, 
stairways  and  closets,  a  building  whose  size,  arrangement,  decoration 
and  stability  which  would  rank  with  any  in  the  state.  Added  to  this  the 
patronage  and  liberality  of  the  citizens  of  Randolph  County,  and  especially 
the  citizens  of  Huntsville  to  the  institution,  which  had  ever  been  marked, 
the  board  of  trustees  were  induced  to  build  a  commodious  and  tasteful 
boarding  house,  three  stories,  besides  the  basement.  The  citizens  of 
Huntsville  for  this  purpose  furnished  $3,000  cash,  by  which  with  a  loan  on 
fii'st  mortgage,  assisted  by  a  loan  of  $3,500  endowment  fund,  secured  by 
second  mortgage  on  the  building,  it  was  completed. 

These  buildings  and  additions  were  completed  in  1871  and  a  con- 
siderable debt  incurred.  In  1873,  the  financial  trouble  which  had  been 
threatening  overwhelmed  the  country,  and  a  wave  more  damaging  and 
blighting  than  war  passed  over  the  college.  For  two  years  longer,  under 
President  Terrill,  it  stood  bravely  on  its  feet  carrying  the  heavy  pressure. 
But  the  boarding-house  was  sold  under  first  mortgage,  and  failing  to 
bring  the  debt,  the  second  mortgage,  $3,500  endowment  fund,  was  lost 
and  the  Jerry  Kingsbury  bequest,  $2,500,  being  swept  away,  w?ien  the 
bank  failed,  and  the  parties  failing  to  come  to  time  on  their  notes,  from 
financial  embarrassments,  the  $10,000  endowment  was  never  realized. 

In  1876,  Rev.  M.  J.  Breaker  came  to  the  head  of  the  institution, 
and  like  his  worthy  predecessor,  Rothwell,  stood  by  it  in  a  dark  hour 
of  peril,  and  by  effort  and  sacrifice  bore  her  on  in  her  noble  mission 
for  three  years  longer,  till  March  21,  1879,  when  a  judgment  having 
been  obtained  against  the  college  for  debt,  and  loooking  for  the  execu- 
tion to  be  levied  in  June  following.  President  Breaker  resigned  and 
the  school  closed  —  the  second  time  in  its  existence  of  23  years;  once 
before  after  the  close  of  the  war  in  1869,  under  President  Rothwell; 
both  times  at  the  spring  term. 

Mount  Pleasant  College,  during  her  23  years  of  existence,  had  been 
presided  over  by  Rev.  William  Thompson,  LL.  D.,  one  year;  Rev.  W.  R. 
Rothwell,  D.D.,  twelve  years;  Rev.  J.  W.  Terrill,  seven  years,  and  Rev. 
M.  J.  Breaker,  three  years;  it  instructed  hosts  of  youths,  turned  out 
109  graduates,  blessed  the  cause  of  education,  elevated  the  community, 
and  demonstrated  the  co-education  of  the  sexes,  as  t?ie  fittest  and 
best. 

Rev.  A.  S.  Worrell,  D.D.,  succeeded  Mr.  Breaker,  and  was  presi- 
dnet  of  the  college  in   1880-81.     Rev.   James   B.   Weber   succeeded   Dr. 


202  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Worrell,  and  had  charge  of  the  college  as  its  president  when  the  build- 
ing was  destroyed  by  fire  (July  13,  1882).  At  the  time  the  college 
building  was  destroyed  there  was  a  debt  on  it  of  $3,000,  which  was 
paid  by  the  friends  of  the  institution.  The  Ferguson  bequest  was 
known  as  the  (Wiley)  Ferguson  bequest.  All  other  debts  had  been 
secured  by  a  mortgage  on  the  building  and  grounds,  and  in  order  to 
pay  this,  the  college  and  grounds  were  sold  in  1883,  and  were  pur- 
chased by  the  court-house  building  committee. 

The  board  of  directors  and  faculty  at  the  time  the  college  was 
burned  down  in  1882,  was:  H.  T.  Fort,  President;  T.  B.  Kirabrougti, 
secretary;  W.  R.  Samuel,  treasurer;  J.  D.  Brown,  Stephen  Connor, 
fessor  of  Natural  Science;  Mrs.  A.  E.  Weber,  Principal  Preparatory 
and  Primary  Departments;  Mrs.  M.  E.  Lasley,  Principal  of  the  Music 
J.  F.  Finks,  P..  T.  Gentry,  J.  D.  Humphrey,  G.  W.  Keebaugh,  R.  J. 
Mansfield,  W.  A.  Martin,  W.  D.  Wilhite,  Alfred  Coulter,  W.  F.  Elliott, 
J.  T.  Fort,  W.  J.  Horsley,  W.  B.  McCrary,  S.  Y.  Pitts,  T.  T.  Elliott,  J. 
C.  Shaefer.  These  trustees  held  the  college  for  the  Mount  Pleasant 
Baptist  Association.  Faculty:  —  Rev.  J.  B.  Weber,  A.  M.,  President, 
Professor  of  Greek,  Moral  Philosophy  and  English;  Miss  Nannie  L.  Ray, 
B.  A.,  Assistant  of  Mathematics  and  Latin;  J.  B.  Weber,  Acting  Pro- 
and  Primary  Departments;  Mfc.  M.  E.  Lasley,  Principal  of  the  Music 
Department. 

The  first  fair  was  held  at  Huntsville  in  the  fall  of  1854.  D.  C.  Garth 
was  president;  Wallace  McCampbell,  vice-president;  William  D.  Malone, 
secretary;  Robert  Y.  Gilman,  treasurer.  The  directors  were:  Dr.  W. 
T.  Dameron,  James  M.  Hammett,  Col.  Thomas  P.  Ruby,  Hon.  James  F. 
Wright,  F.  M.  McLean,  N.  B.  Christian.  The  last  fair  was  held  in  1876. 
The  officers  were :  H.  T.  Rutherford,  president ;  J.  M.  Summers,  first  vice- 
president;  F.  M.  Hammett,  second  vice-president.  The  directors  were 
Louis  Heether,  W.  T.  Rutherford,  James  F.  Robinson,  Capt.  Thomas  B. 
Reed,  James  M.  Baker,  Neal  Holman,  G.  H.  Burckhartt,  S.  T.  Morehead. 

The  present  city  officials  of  Huntsville  are:  Mayor,  Dr.  Robert  E. 
Kiernon ;  clerk.  Ad  S.  Heether ;  treasurer,  James  C.  Lay ;  collector,  Joseph 
S.  Taylor;  attorney,  John  N.  Hamilton;  police  judge,  Wallie  H.  Sandison; 
marshal,  Stephen  W.  Jones;  health  commissioner.  Dr.  John  R.  Mabee; 
engineer,  Dallas  E.  Ingersoll;  street  commissioner,  Kieman  Minor;  chief 
of  fire  department,  Kieman  Minor. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  203 

Aldermen:  G.  P.  Dameron,  N.  D.  Minor,  William  T.  Haley,  H.  L. 
Rutherford,  Jr.;  S.  M.  Corbin,  D.  C.  Griffiths,  William  E.  Mitchell,  Van 
G.  Sutliff. 

Huntsville  has  a  public  library  second  to  none  in  a  town  of  its  size. 
The  building-  is  attractive  and  is  a  substantial  structure.  The  library  is 
well  supplied  with  books  and  is  well  managed. 

The  present  library  board  is  as  follows:  President,  J.  L.  Hammett; 
secretary,  I.  B.  Jackson ;  treasurer,  W.  L.  Dameron ;  W.  C.  Smith,  W.  J. 
Day,  Roy  Sutliff,  J.  G.  Dulaney,  Dr.  D.  A.  Barnhart,  W.  A.  Brooking,  Dr. 
R.  E.  Kiernan. 

The  contract  for  building  the  first  court  house  was  let  on  the  13th 
of  June,  1831,  and  the  building  was  completed  some  time  in  the  fall  of 
the  next  year.  It  was  a  brick  structure,  two  stories  high,  built  in  a 
square  form,  one  room  below  used  as  the  court  room  and  three  above 
used  as  jury  rooms.  One  of  those  small  rooms  was  for  a  number  of  years 
used  as  a  Masonic  hall  and  it  was  there  that  the  first  Masonic  meeting  in 
Huntsville  was  held.  This  building  cost  $2,400  and  it  was  condemned 
and  torn  down  in  the  winter  of  '58  or  the  spring  of  '59. 

The  second  court  house  was  completed  in  1860  by  Henry  Austin, 
who  was  the  contractor.  The  building  was  a  two-story  brick  and  cost 
$15,000.  It  was  burned  August  12,  1882.  Steps  were  immediately  taken 
to  build  another  and  a  third  court  house  was  commenced  during  the  fall 
of  1883  and  finished  in  April,  1884.  J.  M.  Hammett,  W.  T.  Rutherford, 
E.  P.  Kerby,  John  N.  Taylor,  G.  W.  Taylor  and  R.  E.  Lewis  were  the  con- 
tractors and  James  McGrath  of  St.  Louis  was  the  architect.  The  build- 
ing is  a  two-story  brick,  contains  eleven  rooms  and  cost  about  $35,000. 


CHAPTER  XVIII 


MEDICAL  PROFESSION. 


DR.  WILLIAM  PORT,  FIRST  DOCTOR  —  EARLY  CONDITIONS — EARLY  DOCTORS  — 
PHYSICIANS  PROM  1865  TO  1890 — DOCTOR  TERRILL — DOCTOR  VASSE — EARLY 
DOCTORS  AT  HIGBEE,  RENICK,  CLIFTON  HILL,  CAIRO  AND  OTHER  LOCALI- 
TIES—EARLY DOCTORS  AT  MOBERLY— PRESENT  PHY'SICIANS  OF  THE 
COUNTY. 

The  first  doctor  to  locate  within  the  boundaries  of  the  present  county 
of  Randolph  was  Dr.  Wm.  Fort,  who  settled  on  lands  a  few  miles  west 
of  Huntsville  in  the  year  1820. 

At  that  early  period  there  was  not  a  town  nor  village  in  Randolph 
County.  Huntsville  was  laid  out  and  made  the  county  seat  of  Randolph 
County  in  1831.  The  early  villages,  if  they  can  be  called  such,  in  the 
beginning  were  a  store,  a  blacksmith  shop,  probably  a  wagon  shop  and 
a  shoemaker  and  little  else.  About  a  half  a  dozen  families  in  all,  these 
villages  such  as  Roanoke,  on  the  line  between  Howard  and  Randolph, 
Mt.  Airry,  Middle  Grove,  .just  over  the  line  in  Monroe  County  and  Milton 
in  the  southeast  part  of  the  county  were  such. 

The  pioneer  doctor  as  a  rule  settled  on  farming  lands  and  became  a 
land  owner  and  combined  the  vocations  of  farmer  and  doctor.  Other 
pioneer  doctors  of  Randolph  County,  as  near  as  we  can  now  ascertain, 
were  Dr.  Waller  Head,  who  settled  on  lands  adjoining  Huntsville,  Dr. 
Joseph  Rutherford,  who  settled  in  the  same  vicinity  and  probably  a  little 
later  Dr.  J.  J.  Watts,  who  located  in  Huntsville,  also  Dr.  Stephen  Rich- 
mond, who  located  in  the  northwest  part  of  the  county. 

Among  the  very  early  doctors  were  Dr.  C.  F.  Burckhartt,  who  located 
in  the  northern  part  of  the  county  near  where  the  town  of  Jacksonville 
now  stands.     In  the  neighborhood  of  Milton,  the  first  was  probably  Dr. 


HISTOEY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  205 

James  A.  Burton,  who  purchased  a  farm  almost  adjoining  the  village  of 
Milton  and  nearly  the  same  time  Dr.  Robert  R.  Hall,  who  likewise  became 
a  land  owner  in  the  same  vicinity,  where  he  died  a  number  of  years  ago 
at  an  advanced  age.  Dr.  Burton  about  the  beginning  of  the  Civil  War 
moved  to  Lafayette  County  and  there  died. 

In  Prairie  township  in  the  southeast  part  of  the  county  the  pioneer 
doctors  were  Dr.  Wm.  B.  McLean,  probably  the  first  to  come  and  Dr. 
Presley  T.  Oliver. 

At  Roanoke  on  the  county  line,  we  find  no  record  of  the  pioneer  doc- 
tors. Dr.  William  Harvey  and  Doctor  Bagby  were  practicing  physicians, 
however,  past  middle  life  when  the  Civil  War  closed  and  no  doubt  had 
been  practicing  for  a  number  of  years  prior  to  that  time.  Dr.  William 
Walker  was  probably  one  of  the  pioneer  doctors  of  the  southern  part 
of  tY.e  county.  He  settled  in  what  is  now  Moniteau  township  and  after- 
ward removed  to  Howard  County  where  he  died  some  years  ago. 

Between  1865  and  1890  the  physicians  in  active  practice  at  Hunts- 
ville  and  that  section  of  the  county  were  Dr.  John  C.  Oliver,  Dr.  Alex.  L. 
Bibb,  Dr.  R.  E.  Kiernan,  Dr.  Wm.  H.  Taylor,  Dr.  Warren  M.  Dameron  and 
Dr.  John  T.  Fort.  All  of  the  above  named  doctors  were  superior  men, 
skilful  physicians  and  excellent  citizens.     All  are  now  dead. 

In  the  neighborhood  of  Darksville  in  the  northwest  part  of  the  county 
was  Dr.  Robert  A.  Terrill,  who  was  married  to  a  sister  of  Judge  Wm.  A. 
Hall.  Dr.  Terrill  in  the  early  seventies  was  well  advanced  in  years  and 
had  been  practicing  in  that  vicinity  for  a  long  period  of  time.  He  was  a 
good  physician  and  an  excellent  man,  who  attended  the  rich  and  poor  alike. 
If  Doctor  Terrill  could  have  collected  all  the  fees  earned  by  him  in  treat- 
ing the  poor  he  would  have  died  a  richer  man  by  several  thousand  dol- 
lars. And  what  we  say  in  this  respect  of  Dr.  Terrill  is  true  with  refer- 
ence to  all  the  pioneer  doctors  of  the  county. 

We  also  find  Dr.  W.  W.  Vasse  located  on  a  farm  near  Thomas  Hill. 
He  was  likev/ise  a  man  of  fine  character  and  a  capable  physician.  During 
the  same  period  of  time  Dr.  Paul  Yates  was  located  at  Jacksonville  and 
practiced  his  profession  successfully  in  that  vicinity  until  he  removed  to 
the  southern  part  of  the  state  some  years  later. 

In  or  near  Higbee  during  this  same  period  Dr.  Wm.  P.  Dysart  re- 
sided on  a  farm  about  two  miles  northwest  of  Higbee.  Dr.  Lascellus 
Dysart  and  Dr.  L.  J.  Miller  residing  in  Higbee,  practiced  in  that  vicinity 
during  these  same  years. 


206  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

At  Renick  we  find  Dr.  Thomas  Hamilton  and  Dr.  Thomas  Christian, 
and  somewhat  later  Dr.  S.  M.  Forrest  who  served  this  part  of  the  county 
as  medical  practitioners. 

In  the  neighborhood  of  Clifton  Hill,  Dr.  J.  J.  Watts  from  Huntsville 
and  probably  other  Huntsville  physicians  met  the  needs  of  that  com- 
munity until  the  North  Missouri  Railroad  was  extended  west  to  Kansas 
City  and  Clifton  Hill  was  organized  as  a  village.  Thereafter  Dr.  E.  F. 
Wilson  and  Dr.  J.  G.  Baker  located  and  practiced  medicine  in  and  around 
Clifton  Hill. 

In  the  vicinity  of  Cairo,  Doctor  Boucher,  Dr.  J.  G.  Wilson,  and  Doc- 
tor Ridings  were  located  and  there  practiced  from  and  after  the  close  of 
the  Civil  War.     Dr.  Boucher  probably  before. 

During  this  same  period  the  following  named  doctors  located  and 
practiced  their  profession  in  the  city  of  Moberly  and  vicinity:  Dr.  J.  C. 
Tedford,  Dr.  J.  C.  Hickerson,  Dr.  Wm.  A.  Rothwell,  Dr.  John  T.  Cox,  Dr. 
J.  R.  L.  Clarkson,  Dr.  G.  W.  Weems,  Dr.  N.  M.  Baskett  and  Dr.  Thos. 
Irwin. 

All  of  the  above  named  except  Dr.  Baskett  are  dead.  They  were  men 
of  high  attainment  in  the  medical  profession  at  that  time  and  excellent 
citizens  without  exception. 

The  active  practicing  physicians  of  Randolph  County  as  shown  by 
the  record  of  the  roster  furnished  us  by  the  Secretary  of  the  Medical 
Association  of  Randolph  County  are  as  follows:  Moberly. — Dr.  C.  B. 
Clapp,  Dr.  C.  K.  Dutton,  Dr.  William  D.  Halliburton,  Dr.  E.  R.  Hickerson, 
Dr.  S.  T.  Kelly,  Dr.  Frank  L.  McCormick,  Dr.  T;  D.  Mangus,  Dr.  W.  K. 
Megee,  Dr.  O.  K.  Megee,  Dr.  Wm.  H.  Selby,  Dr.  E.  W.  Shrader,  Dr.  S.  P. 
Towles,  Dr.  R.  A.  Mitchell,  Dr.  L.  A.  Bazan,  Dr.  Chas.  H.  Dixon,  Dr.  M. 
R.  Noland,  Dr.  C.  L.  Dodson,  Dr.  G.  G.  Levick,  Dr.  Langdon,  Dr.  J.  S. 
Paey,  Dr.  Thos.  A.  Cottingham,  Dr.  I.  F.  Harlan,  Dr.  0.  0.  Ash,  Dr.  G. 
0.  Cuppaidge,  Dr.  S.  T.  Ragan,  Dr.  L.  0.  Nichels,  Lensley. 

Clark:     Dr.  R.  A.  Woods,  Dr.  N.  K.  Pope. 

Higbee:  Dr.  Chas.  F.  Burkhalter,  Dr.  T.  H.  Dinwiddle,  Dr.  G.  M. 
Nichols,  Dr.  J.  W.  Winn. 

Darksville:     Dr.  Hatton. 

Cairo:     Dr.  J.  P.  Allen. 

Jacksonville:     Dr.  Davis. 

Clifton  Hill:  Dr.  W.  C.  Alexander,  Dr.  A.  J.  Bradsher,  Dr.  J.  A. 
Lowry. 

Huntsville:  Dr.  D.  A.  Bamhart,  Dr.  R.  G.  Epperly,  Dr.  J.  D.  Ham- 
mett,  Dr.  J.  W.  Taylor,  Dr.  W.  P.  Terrill,  Dr.  G.  G.  Bragg. 


CHAPTER  XIX 


BENCH  AND  BAR  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY. 


SECOND  JUDICIAL  DISTRICT  ESTABLISHED— JUDGE  TODD  PRESIDED  OA'BR  FIRST 
CIRCUIT  COURT— FIRST  LAW  VERS  IN  ATTENDANCE— JUDGES  THOMAS  REY- 
NOLDS, JOHN  D.  LELAND,  WILLIAM  A.  HALL,  GEORGE  H.  BURCKHARTT,  JOHN 
A.  HOCKADAY,  ALEXANDER  H.  "WALLER  AND  ALLAN  W.  WALKER— EARLY 
LAWYERS — LATER   MEMBERS   OF    THE    BAR— PRESENT-DAY    LAWYERS. 

The  second  judicial  circuit  in  Missouri  was  established  in  1821,  im- 
mediately after  this  state  was  admitted  into  the  Union.  Judge  David 
Todd,  prior  to  that  time  Territorial  Judge,  was  appointed  judge  of  this 
circuit  by  Gov.  McGirk  and  served  from  1821  until  1837.  This  circuit 
endured  until  1882  as  the  second  circuit,  when  the  General  Assembly  of 
the  state  renumbered  the  circuits  and  the  second  circuit  became  the  ninth 
circuit.  Judge  Todd  presided  over  the  first  circuit  court  that  was  held 
in  Randolph  County  in  1829.  He  was  a  Kentuckian  bom  in  Fayette 
County  in  1790.  He  came  to  Missouri  about  the  year  1818  as  Territorial 
Judge  and  located  first  at  Old  Fi'anklin  in  Howard  County.  Afterward 
he  made  Columbia  in  Boone  County  his  hom.e,  where  he  died  in  1859. 
Judge  Todd  was  regarded  as  an  able  lawyer  and  a  just  judge,  impartial 
and  conscientious. 

John  F.  Ryland,  Joseph  Davis,  Robert  Wilson,  John  B.  Clark  and 
Robert  W.  Wells  were  among  the  lawyers  that  attended  this  first  term 
of  court.  Judge  Ryland  was  an  eminent  lawyer  who  was  first  appointed 
Judge  of  the  sixth  judicial  circuit  and  afterward  one  of  the  judges  of 
the  Supreme  Court.     He  died  in  1873. 

Joseph  Davis  was  born  in  Christian  County,  Kentucky,  in  January, 
1804.     He  came  to  Howard  County  with  his  parents  in  1818.     He  prac- 


208  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

ticed  law  in  Fayette  for  several  years  and  was  an  eminent  lawyer  in 
his  day.     He  served  in  the  Legislature  and  died  at  Fayette. 

Robert  Wilson  was  born  in  November,  1796,  in  August  County,  Vir- 
ginia. In  the  spring  of  1820  he  located  at  Old  Franklin  in  Howard 
County  and  afterward  practiced  law  in  Fayette.  He  served  in  the  Mis- 
souri Legislature  in  1845  and  afterward  in  the  State  Senate.  In  1862 
he  served  an  unexpired  term  in  the  United  States  Senate.  He  died  in  St. 
Joseph,  Missouri. 

General  John  B.  Clark  was  born  in  Madison  County,  Kentucky,  in 
1802,  and  came  with  his  father's  family  to  Howard  County  in  1818.  He 
served  as  an  officer  in  the  Black  Hawk  War  in  1832.  In  1854  he  was 
elected  to  Congress  and  served  for  three  successive  terms.  In  the  War 
of  1861  he  served  as  a  brigadier  general  in  the  Southern  army  and  was 
wounded  at  the  battle  of  Wilson  Creek.  He  was  afterward  a  member  of 
the  Confederate  Congress.  .General  Clark  was  a  lawyer  of  marked  ability 
and  a  fluent  speaker. 

Mr.  Wells  was  the  first  attorney  general  to  appear  and  represent  the 
state  in  the  Randolph  Circuit  Court.  He  was  born  at  Winchester,  Vir- 
ginia, in  1795.  He  was  also  a  lawyer  of  marked  ability.  Mr.  Wells  was 
the  first  circuit  attorney  and  in  1826  was  appointed  attorney  general  of 
the  state  in  which  capacity  he  served  for  a  period  of  ten  years,  rafter- 
wards  he  was  appointed  United  States  District  Judge  for  the  District  of 
Missouri  and  held  this  office  until  his  death,  April  2,  1863,  at  Bowling 
Green,  Kentucky. 

Judge  Todd,  on  retiring  from  the  circuit  bench  in  1837,  was  spcceeded 
by  Judge  Thomas  Reynolds,  who  resided  at  Fayette,  Howard  County. 
Judge  Reynolds  was  born  March  12,  1796,  in  Bracken  County,  Kentucky. 
He  moved  to  Missouri  in  1829  and  located  at  Fayette.  He  was  regarded 
as  a  just  judge  and  bore  a  high  reputation  as  a  jurist.  In  1840  Judge 
Reynolds  resigned  from  the  bench  and  was  elected  governor  of  this  state 
and  died  in  office. 

Judge  John  D.  Leland  was  appointed  judge  of  the  second  circuit  in 
1840  to  fill  the  unexpired  term  of  Judge  Reynolds.  He  served  until  1847 
and  acquitted  himself  on  the  bench  with  credit  and  was  considered  a  just 
judge. 

In  1847,  Judge  William  A.  Hall  of  Randolph  County  was  elected  judge 
of  the  second  judicial  circuit.  Judge  Hall  was  a  man  of  great  ability  and 
a  stem  but  just  judge.  He  served  until  1862  when  he  resigned  to  become 
a  member  of  Congress.     - 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  209 

Judge  George  H.  Burckhartt  of  Randolph  County  was  appointed  to 
fill  the  unexpired  term  of  Judge  Hall  in  1862,  and.  was  afterwards  elected 
and  reelected  from  time  to  time  until  his  death  in  1890.  Judge  Burck- 
hartt was  a  natural  born  judge.  As  a  judge  of  evidence  he  was  unsur- 
passed. He  possessed  a  profound  knowledge  of  human  nature  and  of  men 
and  was  seldom  deceived  by  a  witness  on  the  stand.  Judge  Burckhartt 
was  one  of  the  kindest  of  men  and  at  the  same  time  a  firm  and  just  judge. 
As  a  personal  friend  he  was  steadfast  and  true.  Judge  Burckhartt's 
popularity  in  the  counties  that  then  constituted  the  second  circuit,  Ran- 
dolph, Howard,  Boone  and  Callaway,  was  unbounded  and  he  was  elected 
and  reelected  and  served  altogether  as  judge  twenty-eight  years.  Judge 
Burckhartt  died  in  the  spring  of  1890.  He  was  succeeded  by  Judge  John 
A.  Hockaday  of  Fulton,  Callaway  County.  Judge  Hockaday  served  as 
judge  for  thirteen  years  until  his  death.  He  was  a  man  of  exalted  char- 
acter, a  fine  lawyer,  a  careful  and  just  judge,  painstaking  and  impartial. 
Among  his  close  friends  he  was  one  of  the  most  congenial  of  men.  Upon 
the  bench  he  hewed  to  the  line  and  was  seemingly  austere,  and  at  all 
times  dignified.  Judge  Hockaday  died  in  the  latter  part  of  November, 
1903.  He  was  succeeded  by  Alexander  H.  Waller  of  Moberly,  Randolph 
County,  who  served  for  a  period  of  thirteen  years  and  retired  from  the 
bench  January  1,  1917. 

Judge  Waller  was  succeded  on  the  bench  by  Judge  Allan  W.  Walker 
of  Fayette,  Howard  County,  an  able  lawyer,  patient  and  conscientious. 
Judge  Walker  is  the  present  incumbent  and  has  given  universal  satis- 
faction. 

In  the  early  days  it  was  the  custom  of  members  of  the  bar  to  travel 
with  the  judge  from  court  to  court  over  the  circuit.  Hence  the  lawyers 
in  attendance  at  each  term  of  court  were  composed  largely  of  lawyers  of 
other  counties  in  the  circuit  and  of  adjoining  circuits. 

Among  the  leading  lawyers  of  Randolph  County  in  early  days  were 
Judge  Wm.  A.  Hall,  Judge  George  H.  Burckhartt,  and  Abe  McKinney, 
and  at  a  somewhat  later  date  H.  M.  Porter,  Col.  A.  F.  Denny,  Capt. 
Thomas  B.  Reed,  Robert  Brooking,  Isaac  Bibb,  Judge  John  R.  Hull  and 
probably  others. 

After  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  in  addition  to  the  several  above 
named,  Judge  A.  P.  Terril,  G.  F.  Rothwell,  W.  A.  Martin,  John  R.  Chris- 
tian, W.  T.  McCanne,  W.  N.  Rutherford  and  Thomas  B.  Kimbrought  were 
added  to  the  list  of  active  attorneys,  all  of  whom  made  good  as  able  and 


210  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

successful  practitioners.  In  1878  Mr.  Rothwell  was  elected  a  member 
of  Congress  and  served  one  term.  Judge  A.  P.  Terrill  was  an  exception- 
ally able  lawyer  and  a  safe  counsellor. 

Between  1873  and  1877,  Henry  S.  Priest,  Franklin  P.  Wiley,  Uriel 
S.  Hall,  John  N.  Hamilton,  Ben  T.  Hardin  and  A.  H.  Waller,  all  young 
men,  were  admitted  to  tYie  bar  of  Randolph  County. 

Waller  was  elected  prosecuting  attorney  of  the  county  in  1878,  and 
served  three  terms.  Wiley  was  elected  to  the  legislature  at  the  same 
time  and  was  reelected  in  1880  and  afterward  served  two  terms  as  prose- 
cuting attorney  from  1892  to  1896.  Mr.  Wiley  was  an  able  lawyer  and 
probably  the  most  resourceful  and  skillful  trial  lawyer  the  county  ever 
had.  He  was  a  high  class  man  in  every  respect,  well  educated,  fearless, 
a  ready  and  forceful  speaker,  and  a  true  friend.  Mr.  Wiley  was  born  in 
Illinois  in  1853,  and  died  at  his  home  in  Moberly  at  the  age  of  forty-five 
years,  in  December,  1898. 

Henry  S.  Priest  in  1881  removed  to  the  city  of  St.  Louis  and  there 
served  iirst  as  attorney  for  the  Missouri-Pacific  Railroad  Company,  next 
as  attorney  for  t?ie  Wabash  Railroad  Company  and  again  for  the  Mis- 
souri Pacific,  as  general  counsel.  While  serving  in  this  capacity  in  1895 
he  was  appointed  U.  S.  District  Judge  for  the  eastern  district  of  Missouri. 
Judge  Priest  served  in  this  capacity  for  about  two  years  then  resigned 
and  the  firm  of  Boyle,  Priest  and  Lehmann  was  organized.  All  of  the 
three  lawyers  who  constituted  this  firm  were  exceptionally  able  lawyers 
and  this  firm  became  one  of,  if  not  the  leading,  law  firm  of  St.  Louis. 
Judge  Priest  is  now  living  in  the  city  of  St.  Louis  and  is  yet  practicing 
law  with  one  or  more  of  his  sons. 

Ben  T.  Hardin  succeeded  A.  H.  Waller  as  prosecuting  attorney  and 
served  in  that  capacity  from  January,  1885,  until  January,  1889.  Shortly 
thereafter  he  removed  to  Kansas  City  and  has  since  practiced  law  in 
that  city,  successfully  and  profitably,  and  is  yet  one  of  the  leading  trial 
lawyers  at  that  bar. 

Judge  Waller  was  elected  mayor  of  the  city  of  Moberly  in  April, 
1899,  in  which  capacity  he  served  a  term  of  two  years  and  was  there- 
after appointed  circuit  judge,  as  we  have  already  seen. 

Uriel  S.  Hall,  one  of  the  five  above  named,  was  endowed  with  great 
energy  and  strength,  both  physical  and  mental.  He  practiced  law  in 
Randolph  County  successfully  until  the  beginning  of  the  year  1882,  when 
he  removed  to  Kansas  City,  where  hr  practiced  law  about  two  years, 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  211 

when  he  retired  from  the  law  and  took  charge  of  the  large  fertile  farm 
belonging  to  his  father,  consisting  of  about  700  acres,  situated  in  the 
northwest  part  of  Randolph  County,  which  he  operated  energetically 
and  successfully  until  he  was  elected  to  Congress  in  1892.  He  was  re- 
elected in  1894  and  served  altogether  four  years.  Mr.  Hall  was  a  sound 
money  Democrat  as  was  President  Cleveland,  and  was  not  again  a  candi- 
date for  Congress.  Since,  Mr.  Hall  has  been  an  educator  and  the  head 
of  several  colleges  and  schools  and  has  proved  himself  to  be  equally 
efficient  as  an  educator  as  well  as  in  other  vocations. 

After  1882  Willard  P.  Cave,  Will  A.  Rothwell,  Forrest  G.  Ferries 
and  William  Palmer  were  successively  within  the  next  decade  added  to 
the  list  of  lawyers  of  Randolph  County. 

Mr.  Cave  is  still  practicing  law  in  the  city  of  Moberly  and  is  regarded 
as  one  of  the  county's  ablest  lawyers  and  has  a  large  and  lucrative  prac- 
tice. 

Mr.  Ferries  practiced  law  in  Moberly  for  a  number  of  years.  He 
was  studious  and  unassuming,  but  his  worth  and  ability  finally  became 
manifest  and  he  was  appointed  assistant  to  the  attorney-general  by  At- 
torney-General Hadley.  Later  he  was  appointed  assistant  circuit  attor- 
ney of  the  city  of  St.  Louis,  and  afterwards  became  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  Ferries  and  Rosskopf,  which  firm  is  now  doing  a  lucrative  busi- 
ness in  the  city  of  St.  Louis. 

Will  A.  Rothwell  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1885  and  began  the 
active  practice  of  law  in  1891,  when  he  was  elected  city  attorney  of 
Moberly.  He  was  a  highly  educated  and  brilliant  man  and  rapidly  grew 
into  an  able  and  successful  lawyer.  He  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
Missouri  legislature  in  1894  and  served  one  term.  In  1896  he  was 
elected  prosecuting  attorney  of  Randolph  County  and  served  two  terms. 
He  proved  himself  to  be  an  able  and  successful  prosecutor.  In  1892  he 
was  made  chairman  of  the  Democratic  state  committee  of  the  state  of 
Missouri  and  successfully  managed  the  Democrat  campaign  that  year. 
In  1894  he  was  appointed  member  of  the  national  Democratic  committee 
and  served  in  that  capacity  until  his  death  in  October,  1908,  aged  46 
years. 

Mr.  Palmer  was  born  and  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  rapidly 
developed  into  a  good  lawyer  after  his  admission  to  the  bar.  He 
was  elected  prosecuting  attorney  of  the  county  and  served  four  years. 
Within  a  short  time  after  the  termination  of  his  services  as  prosecut- 


212  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

ing  attorney  he  died  at  his  home  in  Moberly,  still  a  young  man.  Will 
Palmer  had  many  friends  and  his  untimely  death  was  a  cause  of  gen- 
eral regret  throughout  the  county. 

John  N.  Hamilton  is  the  senior  member  of  the  bar  of  Huntsville, 
having  been  admitted  to  the  bar  in  the  late  seventies,  and  since  that 
time  has  been  a  worthy  member.  He  is  an  able  lawyer,  a  progressive 
citizen,  and  has  held  several  county  offices,  recorder  of  deeds  being  one 
of  the  several  offices  that  he  has  filled  with  credit. 

The  bar  of  Randolph  County  will  rank  with  any  bar  of  equal  num- 
bers in  this  state,  not  only  as  capable  lawyers,  but  as  progressive  citi- 
zens and  men  of  high  character.  In  the  court  room  they  contest  their 
cases  vigorously  and  efficiently,  but  courteously.  A  half  a  century  ago 
personal  strife  and  biting  personalities  were  not  uncommon  in  courts  of 
record  and  jealousy  and  personal  enmity  among  members  of  the  bar 
was  a  rule,  rather  than  the  exception.  Thirty  years  ago  the  bar  of  Ran- 
dolph County  composed  as  it  then  was  of  right  minded  men  as  .well 
as  able  lawyers  reversed  this  order  of  things,  and  enmity  and  strife 
among  the  members  of  the  bar  became  a  thing  of  the  past  in  this  county. 
The  bar  of  Randolph  is  now  organized  into  a  bar  association  and  live 
together  in  peace  each  one  respecting  the  other  as  he  deserves,  and 
are  following  the  footsteps  of  the  predecessors  of  the  last  generation  in 
this  respect. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  active  members  of  the  bar  of  Moberly,  Ran- 
dolph County:  William  P.  Cave,  J.  W.  Wight,  Jr.,  A.  H.  Waller,  Major 
Lilly,  E.  0.  Doyle,  Aubrey  R.  Hammett,  E.  J.  Howard,  Thos.  Tydings, 
A.  C.  Gladney,  Warwick  McCanne,  S.  0.  Hunter,  Arthur  Chamier,  Jerry 
M.  Jeffries,  Frank  Lofty,  0.  R.  O'Brien,  W.  B.  Stone,  Edmund  Burk, 
J.  A.  Walden,  Wm.  Morrissey,  David  E.  Janes. 

The  following  members  of  the  bar  are  not  in  active  practice:  J.  Mor- 
ris Graves,  special  court  reporter;  Jerome  Reigel,  office  practice  only;  J. 
F.  Rothwell,  retired ;  James  R.  Lowell,  post  master  and  editor  of  Moberly 
"Democrat." 

Active  members  of  the  bar  at  Huntsville  are:  Norman  Johnson, 
John  N.  Hamilton,  Madison  Stringer. 


CHAPTER  XX 


EARLY  CHURCHES. 


FIRST  CHURCH  ORGANIZED  IN  1819 — OTHER  EARLY  ORGANIZATIONS — PRIMITIVE; 
AND  MISSIONARY  BAPTISTS — MT.  PLEASANT  COLLEGE  BUILT — PROVIDENCE 
METHODIST  CHURCH — ANTIOCH  CHRISTIAN  CHURCH — SALEM  CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH — SUGAR  CREEK  CUMBERLAND  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH — MT.  HOPE 
CUMBERLAND    PRESBYTERIAN    CHURCH. 

The  first  church  was  organized  in  Randolph  County  on  the  third 
Saturday  in  August,  1819,  by  the  Primitive  Baptists  under  the  name  of 
"Happy  Zion,"  afterwards  changed  to  Silver  Creek.  In  the  following 
month  this  church  united  with  the  Mount  Pleasant  Association  organized 
at  Mount  Pleasant,  Howard  County.  Thereafter  churches  were  organ- 
ized at  Mount  Harmon,  Mount  Ararat,  Pleasant  Grove,  Dover  and  Little 
Union,  located  one  mile  north  of  Huntsville,  organized  in  1828.  These 
churches  were  likewise  Primitive  Baptist  churches  and  all  except  Silver 
Creek  church  are  not  extinct. 

About  1835  the  Baptist  church  split  and  organized  separate  congre- 
gations known  as  the  Regular  or  Primitive  Baptists  and  Missionary  Bap- 
tists. 

Mount  Pleasant  College  was  erected  and  the  building  completed  be- 
tween 1855  and  1857.  A  school  of  150  pupils  was  established,  the  chapel 
of  the  college  was  used  by  the  Missionary  Baptists  at  Huntsville  from 
and  after  that  time  until  the  building  was  burned  in  1882. 

In  1858  the  Mount  Vernon  church.  Missionary  Baptist,  was  organ- 
ized. Prior  to  1868  Dark's  Prairie  church  was  organized  and  held  its 
meetings  one  mile  north  of  Clifton  Hill  until  1868,  when  the  congregation 
moved  into  a  new  church  structure  in  the  village  of  Clifton  Hill. 


214  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

In  1871,  Good  Hope,  Missionary  Baptist  church,  was  organized  and, 
no  doubt,  there  were  other  Missionary  Baptist  churches  in  the  county 
prior  to  the  Civil  War,  but  we  have  no  data  as  to  when  these  churches 
were  organized. 

In  1834,  Providence  church,  Methodist,  was  organized  at  the  resi- 
dence of  S.  J.  Johnson.  In  1836  this  congregation  held  its  services 
at  the  Johnson  school  house  and  in  1846  they  erected  Old  Providence 
church  and  called  it  the  "Twelve  Corners."  In  1878  a  new  church  build- 
ing was  erected. 

Antioch  Christian  church  was  organized  the  first  Sunday  in  June, 
1837. 

After  the  town  of  Higbee  was  established  the  church  was  moved 
to  that  place  where  a  new  church  building  was  erected  in  1880. 

Salem  Christian  church  was  organized  in  the  summer  of  1873. 

Antioeh  Christian  church  was  apparently  the  pioneer  Christian 
church  of  Randolph  County.  This  church  is  noted  in  that  it  sent  into 
the  ministry  several  preachers  of  conspicuous  ability,  namely:  Henry 
H.  Haley,  Thos.  Haley,  E.  J.  Lampton  and  Alexander  Proctor.  The  two 
last  named  were  eminent  preachers.  Neither  the  one  nor  the  other 
were  narrow  or  sectarian,  but  were  eminently  liberal  with  respect  to 
members  of  other  churches.  Alexander  Proctor,  in  the  opinion  of  the 
writer  of  this  article,  was  one  of  the  great  if  not  the  greatest  religious 
teacher  that  Missouri  has  ever  sent  forth.  He  was  too  broad  and  charit- 
able to  question  the  Christianity  of  any  other  church  member  or  its 
efficacy.  For  thirty-six  years  he  was  pastor  in  the  Christian  church  at 
Independence,  Missouri,  and  died  there  recently. 

The  Sugar  Creek  Cumberland  Presbyterian  church  building  was 
erected  by  the  congregation  already  organized  in  1840.  This  church 
stands  about  two  miles  north  of  Moberly  and  was  there  standing  when 
the  tall  prairie  grass  waved  over  the  site  of  the  present  city.  The 
church  was  organized  in  1834  by  the  Rev.  Samuel  C.  Davis. 

Mount  Hope,  Cumberland  Presbyterian  church,  was  constructed  in 
1874.  The  congregation  had  been  organized  as  a  church  sometime  prior 
thereto. 

Since  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  church  buildings  have  multiplied  in 
Randolph  County. 


CHAPTER  XXI 


TRANSPORTATION. 


STEAMBOAT  TO  HANNIBAL  AND  GLASGOW— SUPPLIES  HAULED  OVERLAND — NORTH 
MISSOURI  RAILROAD  IN  1858— RAILROAD  BUILDING  SUSPENDED  DURING 
CIVIL  WAR— CHICAGO  &  ALTON  BUILT  IN  1871— WABASH  RAILROAD  AND  ITS 
BRANCHES — THE  MISSOURI,  KANSAS  &  TEXAS— RAILROAD  PROSPECTS  IN 
CONTEMPLATION. 


Randolph  County,  as  we  have  seen,  was  organized  in  1829.  By  this 
time  or  shortly  thereafter,  steamboats  began  to  run  more  or  less  regu- 
larly on  both  the  Missouri  and  Mississippi  rivers.  Goods  and  groceries, 
such  as  sugar,  tea,  coiTee,  hardware  and  other  necessaries,  were  obtained 
by  the  merchants  of  Randolph  County  either  from  Hannibal  or  from 
Glasgow.  Glasgow,  being  the  nearer,  was  the  usual  shipping  point  where 
produce  was  shipped  and  merchants  received  goods  bought  in  St.  Louis 
or  farther  east. 

The  ability  to  obtain  necessary  supplies  and  hardware  material  aided 
in  the  improvement  and  development  of  the  county.  Emigrants  coming 
into  the  state  had  their  choice  to  come  overland  by  wagon  or  they  could 
come  by  boat  to  Hannibal  or  Glasgow  and  thence  to  their  destination 
by  land.  '   ■«* 

In  the  year  1858,  the  North  Missouri  Railroad  leading  from  St.  Louis, 
nort?.west  and  north,  was  built  into  Randolph  County,  entering  the  county 
near  its  southeast  corner,  thence  northwest  to  a  point  three  miles  south  of 
the  city  of  Moberly,  and  thence  north  to  the  town  of  Allen,  where  it 
crossed  the  state  road  leading  from  Huntsville  to  Paris.  This  road  was 
extended  the  same  year  northward  to  Macon  City,  being  completed  to 
that  point  where  it  connected  with  the  Hannibal  and  St.  Joseph  Railroad 
in  February,  1859.  The  building  of  the  North  Missouri  Railroad  through 
the  county  put  Randolph  County  on  the  map  as  a  railroad  county. 


216  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

The  war  between  the  states  known  as  the  Civil  War  or  War  of  the 
Rebellion  began  in  April,  1861.  During  the  four  years  that  this  unhappy 
struggle  continued,  railroad  building,  and  indeed  every  constructive  enter- 
prise, was  halted.  Directly  after  the  close  of  the  war  projected  lines  of 
railroad  so  halted  by  the  war,  many  of  them  were  speedily  constructed 
The  projected  line  from  Moberly  westward  to  Kansas  City  was  constructec 
between  the  years  of  1865  and  1868.  The  projected  railroad  from  Hanni- 
bal to  Moberly  was  constructed  and  completed  between  1869  and  1872 
and  shortly  thereafter  in  the  same  or  following  year  the  railroad  first 
known  as  the  Tebo  and  Neosho,  afterward  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas 
Railroad,  was  extended  south  through  Fayette  and  Boonville  to  Sedalia  and 
from  thence  south  to  Texas.  About  the  same  time,  or  shortly  thereafter, 
a  branch  line  was  built  northwest  from  Brunswick,  following  along  the 
valley  of  the  Grand  river  through  the  cities  of  Chillicothe,  Gallatin  and  on 
to  Pattonsburg,  where  it  connected  with  the  Omaha,  Quincy  and  Kansas 
City  Railroad. 

A  number  of  years  later  the  line  of  road  extending  from  Brunswick  to 
Omaha  was  purchased  and  became  and  is  yet  part  of  the  Wabash  System. 

In  1871  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad  Company  constructed  its  line 
of  railroad  westward  from  Mexico  through  Randolph  County  and  from 
thence  westward  to  Kansas  City.  With  the  completion  of  these  several 
roads  and  branch  lines  all  constructed  within  the  fifteen  years  elapsing 
between  1858  and  1873,  Randolph  County  had  probably  a  greater  mileage 
of  railroads  than  any  inland  county  within  the  state.  At  the  present  day 
that  part  of  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas  Railroad  extending  from 
Moberly  to  Hannibal  is  used  by  both  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas  and 
the  Wabash  railroads. 

From  Moberly  the  Wabash  railroad  and  its  branch  lines  extend  to 
St.  Louis,  Hannibal,  Ottumwa,  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  to  Kansas  City  west- 
ward and  to  Omaha  in  the  northwest.  The  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas 
likewise  operates  its  trains  to  and  from  Hannibal  and  from  Moberly  south 
to  the  Gulf  of  Mexico.  The  Chicago  and  Alton  railroad  enters  Randolph 
County  east  of  Clark,  passes  through  Clark,  Higbee  and  Yates,  and  from 
thence  into  Howard  County  and  on  to  Kansas  City  through  Glasgow. 

Prior  to  the  entry  of  the  United  States  into  the  World  War  the  Santa 
Fe  and  Burlington  systems  of  railroiad  had  determined  to  build  a  line  of 
railroad  from  Carrollton,  Missouri,  through  Randolph  County  to  Mexico, 
Missouri,  where  it  would  connect  with  the  Burlingrton  road  extending  from 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  217 

Mexico  to  St.  Louis.  It  was  further  determined  by  the  Burlington  Rail- 
road Company  that  this  company  would  build  a  line  of  railroad  from  or- 
near  Monroe  City,  southwesterly  through  Monroe  County  and  through  the 
city  of  Moberly  to  a  junction  point  of  said  roads  about  five  miles  south- 
west of  Moberly  and  much  of  the  right-of-way  for  these  railroads  had 
already  been  acquired,  prior  to  the  declaration  of  war  by  this  government 
against  the  German  Empire. 

That  these  railroads  will  be  ultimately  built  seems  a  certainty.  The 
grade  of  these  roads,  established  by  their  engineers,  does  not  exceed  three 
per  centum  throughout  their  length. 

It  was  further  projected  by  the  Burlington  road  that  a  like  grade  would 
be  obtained  between  Monroe  City  and  Quincy,  Illinois.  By  this  line  the 
distance  from  Chicago  to  Kansas  City  over  the  Burlington  road  would  be 
shortened  thirty  or  thirty-five  miles,  and  the  grade  so  obtained  would  en- 
able said  railroad  to  economically  compete  with  any  railroad  now  operating 
from  Kansas  City  to  Chicago,  the  Santa  Fe  included. 

When  these  roads  are  completed,  as  they  will  be,  Randolph  County 
will  be  a  veritable  railroad  center  and  will  have  direct  lines  of  railroad 
radiating  in  every  direction  and  that  too  over  the  shortest  lines. 


CHAPTER  XXII 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


THE    "RAZORBACK" — FROM    THE    AUTOBIOGRAPHY    OF    LIBERTY    NOBLE — INDIAN- 
SCARE  OF  1829. 

THE  RAZORBACK. 

With  the  coming  of  the  pioneer  to  the  Boonslick  Country  came  the  pio- 
neer hog,  the  "razorback." 

The  "razorback"  like  the  pioneer  was  no  pampered  child  of  fortune. 
He  was  likewise  of  the  pioneer  type,  in  that  he  was  somewhat  long  of 
limb,  gaunt,  muscular,  active,  strong  and  swift  of  foot,  when  occasion 
required.  He  was  further  of  the  pioneer  type  in  that  he  was  active,  cour- 
ageous and  self-reliant,  and  frequently  it  was  a  case  of  "root  hog  or  die" 
with  both  man  and  hog. 

For  the  purpose  of  rooting  the  "razorback"  was  well  equipped.  His 
shoulders,  neck  and  head  were  large  and  muscular  and  his  nose  was  long, 
terminating  with  a  rooting  attachment  that  needed  no  repair.  This  nose, 
however,  was  not  equipped  with  a  coulter  and  the  tough  prairie  sod  was 
too  tough  of  a  proposition  for  him  as  well  as  for  the  pioneer  settler,  hence 
they  both  went  to  the  woods  together  where  they  could  make  an  honest 
living  the  year  around  by  the  industrious  use  of  hand  and  snout. 

The  woods  at  that  time  had  other  inhabitants,  bears,  panthers,  wild 
cats,  and  wolves  in  great  numbers,  but  the  razorback  went  forth  fearlessly 
at  hunger's  call  or  just  because  he  wanted  to,  that  is,  the  full-growns  did, 
and  unless  restrained,  the  younger  ones  followed.  The  "razorback"  was 
armed  for  defense.  From  his  lower  jaw  projecting  upward  and  outward 
were  strong,  sharp,  curved  tusks,  several  inches  in  length,  and  set  into 
the  upper  jaw  were  shorter  upturned  tusks  that  co-ordinated  with  the 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  219 

larger  ones  below.  In  battle  the  "razorback"  fought  by  lowering  his 
head  and  striking  upward.  These  upper  thrusts  driven  by  the  powerful 
next  muscles  were  capable  of  inflecting  long,  deep,  ragged  wounds,  some- 
times dangerous  or  deadly. 

The  "razorbacks"  in  the  woods  usually  herded  together.  When  a 
member  of  the  herd  by  prolonged  squealing  gave  the  signal  of  distress  the 
grown  ups  of  the  herd,  with  bristles  erect  rushed  to  the  rescue,  and 
whether  the  trouble  maker  be  man  or  animal  the  only  safe  way  was  up  a 
tree  or  rapid  flight. 

The  "razorback,"  though  homely  and  bristly,  was  invaluable  to  the 
early  settler.  He  could  take  care  of  himself.  He  was  able  and  willing 
to  make  his  own  living  in  the  woods  ten  months  in  the  year,  if  need  be, 
and  was  therefore  a  cheap  boarder.  The  "razorback"  was  seldom  con- 
verted into  bacon  before  he  was  eighteen  months  or  two  years  old.  Run- 
ning at  large,  he  grew  more  slowly,  his  keep  was  trifling  and  he  usually 
survived  until  the  fall  of  his  second  year.  Having  grown  fat  on  acorns 
and  nuts  the  settler  would  round  up  his  herd,  separate  and  confine  in  a 
closed  pen  all  those  that  he  designed  to  butcher,  feed  them  corn  for  a 
few  weeks  until  assured  that  the  meat  and  lard  would  be  firm  and  of  the 
best,  then  a  day  was  set  and  the  hog  killing  was  held.  Usually  the  near 
neighbors  assisted  and  frequently  a  score  or  more  hogs  were  butchered 
and  cut  up  in  a  single  day. 

Then  the  meat  was  salted  down,  the  lard  rendered  out,  and  in  early 
days  before  the  advent  of  the  sausage  grinder,  sausage  was  made  by 
beating  the  meat  into  a  pulp  on  a  block  with  hammers. 

Aside  from  the  labor  of  feeding  the  hogs  at  times,  and  that  incident 
to  butchering  and  curing  the  meat,  the  cost  of  bacon  to  the  farmer  was 
trivial  compared  to  the  cost  of  today,  nor  does  the  packing  house  bacon 
of  this  period  of  time  compare  in  excellence  with  the  delicious  country 
cured  hams,  smoked  with  hickory  wood  and  carved  out  of  these  mature 
hogs. 

But  the  "razorback,"  indispensable  to  the  early  settlers,  could  not 
endure.  He  had  his  day  in  north  Missouri,  and  his  decline.  As  the  trees 
in  the  wooded  districts  fell  year  by  year  under  the  blows  of  the  woods- 
man's ax,  the  noise  of  their  falhng  beat  the  "razorback's"  "last  tattoo." 
With  the  going  of  the  woods  went  the  razorback,  with  improved  methods 
of  farming  came  improved  breeds  of  hogs,  cattle,  sheep  and  horses.  The 
"razorback"  had  served  and  served  well — his  purpose  and  his  mission 
Tvas  ended. 


220  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

In  the  Ozarks  he  survived  until  the  Civil  War.  The  late  Proctor 
Knott,  for  many  years  a  Kentucky  congressman,  while  a  young  man  spent 
some  years  in  the  Ozarks  and  while  there  was  elected  to  the  Missouri 
legislature  shortly  before  the  Civil  War.  While  so  serving  he  made  a 
speech  in  the  house,  boosting  the  Ozarks  and  their  many  resources,  their 
climate,  fishing,  streams,  fruit  trees,  fertile  valleys,  and  their  endless 
forests  of  oak  that  covered  the  hills  and  bore  fruit  and  almost  covered 
the  ground  with  acorns  in  the  fall  of  the  year.  Among  other  assets  he 
introduced  the  "razorback"  as  a  prime  asset  in  that  timbered  region. 
After  describing  him  and  his  characteristics  of  courage,  industry,  and 
his  ability  to  provide  for  and  defend  himself  against  all  comers  without 
human  aid,  he  wound  up  by  saying  "that  the  'razorback'  could  readily 
root  potatoes  out  of  the  third  row  through  a  crack  in  the  fence." 

It  seems  from  the  following  incident  that  the  "razorback"  may  yet 
survive  in  some  of  the  timbered  regions  farther  south.  A  Pennsylvania 
breeder  of  fine  hogs  had  a  pen  of  assorted  sizes  on  exhibition  at  the  Rich- 
mond, Virginia,  Exposition,  held  a  half  score  years  ago.  A  North  Caro- 
lina farmer  came  along,  stopped,  leaned  on  the  fence  of  the  pen  and 
leisurely  scanned  its  inmates.  They  were  show  hogs,  short  legged  and 
fat.  Some  were  lying  down  and  others  were  waddling  around  in  the  pen. 
The  owner  came  around  hoping  to  sell  and  said,  "What  do  you  think 
of  them?" 

"I  never  saw  such  hogs  before.  They  sure  do  look  fine,"  replied  the 
tar  heel. 

"Don't  you  want  a  pair  to  take  home  with  you?"  inquired  the  Penn- 
sylvanian. 

"No,"  replied  the  North  Carolinian  slowly,  "they  would  be  of  no 
account  to  me,  stranger.  No  hog  is  worth  a  d — ^m  in  the  country  where 
I  live  that  can't  outrun  a  nigger." 

FROM  THE  AUTOBIOGRAPHY  OF  LIBERTY  NOBLE. 

Liberty  Noble  was  born  in  Casey  County  on  November  10,  1809.  He 
was  the  third  son  of  Mark  Noble  and  Rachel,  his  wife.  In  June,  1817, 
Mark  Noble  and  his  family,  consisting  of  a  wife,  seven  sons  and  three 
daughters,  moved  from  Kentucky  to  Howard  County,  Missouri,  and  four 
years  later,  on  March  8,  1821,  moved  to  Randolph  County.  The  follow- 
ing is  an  excript  from  his  autobiography: 

"About  the  year  1829  we  moved  to  near  where  Huntsvill©  now 
stands  and  cleared  off  the  first  twelve  acres  of  the  city  lots.     We  com- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  221 

menced  nearly  exactly  where  the  court  house  now  stands.  The  contract 
was  let  to  the  lowest  bidder  and  my  father  secured  the  contract.  We 
also  burnt  the  lime  for  Randolph's  first  court  house.  Two  weeks  were 
spent  in  building  a  lime  kiln.  We  found  two  trees  on  the  hillside  some 
thirty  feet  apart  and  hauled  our  logs  and  piled  them  upon  each  other 
against  the  two  trees  until  we  had  a  large  pile;  then  we  hauled  rocks 
and  stacking  them  on  the  long  heap  set  fire  to  the  logs.  When  the 
logs  had  burned  away  the  rocks  being  burnt  were  left  in  a  heap  something 
similar  to  the  form  in  which  they  were  placed.  Then  we  slacked  this 
burnt  rock  and  had  our  lime. 

Lumber  was  sawed  by  hand  in  those  days  and  I  have  helped  to 
saw  thousands  of  feet  with  the  old  hand  lip  saw.  I  have  had  the  privilege 
of  sawing  lumber  with  Missouri's  Ex-Governor  Jackson.  We  found  two 
trees  somewhat  like  we  did  in  commencing  a  lime  kiln.  These  trees  must 
have  forks  some  six  or  eight  feet  from  the  ground.  In  these  forks  we 
placed  a  pole  called  a  ridge  pole.  On  the  ridge  pole  we  put  two  other 
poles  with  one  end  of  each  on  the  hill  side.  Then  we  hewed  our  logs 
square,  rolled  them  on  the  poles,  lined  them  on  top  and  on  the  bottom 
the  entire  length,  and  with  one  sawyer  on  top  and  the  other  on  the  ground 
sawed  out  our  lumber.  We  stuck  one  end  of  the  logs  as  far  over  one 
of  the  poles  as  we  could  not  to  overbalance  and  then  ripped  all  the  logs 
at  that  end;  then  slipped  them  endways  past  the  pole  and  sawed  again 
to  the  other  pole  and  so  on  through  the  log.  We  could  saw  about  two 
hundred  feet  in  a  day  by  this  method. 

In  the  fall  of  the  year  of  1832,  I  with  four  friends  went  on  a  bee 
hunt.  It  was  the  month  of  September  and  we  went  to  the  Chariton  river, 
eight  or  ten  miles  northwest  of  where  Kirksville  now  stands.  We  camped 
over  night  and  spent  the  next  day  in  locating  bee  trees.  We  were  gone 
twenty-three  days  and  brought  home  309  gallons  of  strained  honey,  one 
tub  and  two  buckets  full  of  honey  in  the  comb  and  a  good  quantity  of 
beeswax. 

When  my  father  first  moved  to  Missouri  hogs  were  very  scarce  and 
he  paid  one  dollar  for  a  very  small  pig.  I  remember  our  hogs  used  to  run 
outside,  and  during  the  summer  when  we  were  busy  in  our  crops  and 
harvesting,  we  would  not  see  our  hogs  for  sometimes  three  months  at 
a  time  and  they  would  become  rather  wild,  so  we  would  have  to  hunt  their 
beds  and  drive  them  home. 


222  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  houses  in  which  we  lived  were  built  of  logs  hewn  out  by  our 
own  broadaxes,  and  chinked  with  sticks,  rocks  and  mud.  They  were 
almost  always  built  with  a  chimney  in  the  west  side  so  the  heat  as  we 
thought  would  be  on  the  coldest  side  of  the  house.  The  chimney  was 
built  according  to  the  number  of  children  in  the  family,  a  small  family 
built  a  small  chimney  and  sometimes  a  chimney  occupied  nearly  all  the 
west  end  of  the  house.  Then  a  log  was  split  and  legs  put  into  it  to  make 
a  bench  for  each  side  of  the  fireplace,  and  a  long  bench  made  for  in 
front  of  it.  Some,  though  not  all,  of  the  bedsteads  were  one-legged  ones. 
A  post  placed  from  one  corner  of  the  room  and  poles  reached  from  the 
post  to  the  walls  and  plank  put  on  these  formed  the  platform  on  which 
our  straw  beds  were  placed  and  after  awhile  some  people  became  rich 
enough  to  afford  geese  and  they  had  feather  beds. 

We  had  to  go  twenty  or  twenty-five  miles  to  mill  and  then  furnish 
our  team  to  grind  our  grain.  The  mills  were  old  fashioned  sweep-mills 
and  ground  the  corn  somewhat  similar  to  the  way  molasses  cane  is 
mashed  now.  There  were  two  mills  in  Howard  County,  one  was  run  by 
Colonel  Snoddy  and  the  other  by  Paddy  Woods. 

Our  grain  was  cut  with  a  reap  hook  and  very  slow  work  it  -{vas.  We 
caught  a  bunch  of  grain  by  the  top  with  the  left  hand  and  cut  it  with 
a  reap  hook  in  our  right  hand,  and  when  we  had  thus  cut  across  a  field 
we  hung  the  reap  hook  on  our  shoulder  and  bound  the  grain  we  had 
cut  as  we  came  back. 

I  never  went  to  but  three  schools  in  my  life  and  only  went  about 
half  the  time  then  for  I  had  to  stay  at  home  and  work.  Schools  were 
taught  in  the  spring  and  summer  just  when  the  most  work  was  done. 
I  went  to  one  school  in  1819  in  Howard  County  to  Joseph  Persinger  and 
in  1823  in  Randolph  County  to  John  Dysart,  a  brother  of  Rev.  James 
Dysart  of  the  Cumberland  Presbyterian  church.  The  next  year,  1824, 
I  went  to  Nic  Dysart,  also  a  brother  of  the  preacher.  Our  schoolhouses 
had  only  dirt  floors  and  they  would  get  pretty  dusty  sometimes.  At  our 
writing  desk  a  log  was  cut  out  so  as  to  give  us  light  and  we  stood  and 
wrote  with  a  split  log  for  a  desk  and  used  ink  made  from  indigo  and 
oak  berries  and  a  goose  quill  for  a  pen.  The  benches  were  made  of  split 
logs  with  wooden  pegs  for  the  legs  and  were  generally  made  of  cotton- 
wood  or  lime  so  as  to  be  soft  so  they  would  not  have  to  be  cushioned. 
Our  feet  dangled  between  the  bench  and  floor  and  as  we  had  no  lazy 
backs  to  the  benches  we  did  not  have  to  have  our  coats  patched  in  the 
back. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  223 

The  plows  we  used  were  single  shovels  made  by  a  blacksmith  and  the 
bar-shear  plow,  which  had  a  wooden  mouldboard,  as  did  the  Gary  plow 
which  came  into  use  a  few  years  later.  These  plows  were  about  ten  inches 
wide  and  if  a  man  broke  two  acres  a  day  he  had  done  something  extra. 
Our  harness  were  all  homemade;  the  collars  were  made  of  linn  bark  and 
shucks.  The  hames  were  made  by  ourselves  and  had  a  hole  bored  through 
them  into  which  the  rope  tug  was  run  and  with  some  bark  and  a  knot 
fastened.  The  rope  tugs  were  made  by  twisting  tow  and  flax  together. 
A  notch  was  cut  in  the  end  of  a  singletree,  and  we  made  a  loop  in  the  tug 
and  slipped  it  over  the  end.  Very  often  we  had  no  backhands  to  the 
harness,  but  occasionally  some  would  make  them  out  of  bark  and  shucks. 
Old  Mr.  McClain,  whose  son  lived  in  McClainsville,  said  he  could  not  raise 
a  crop  without  hickorj'  bark.  It  was  used  for  as  many  things  as  string 
is  now. 

Our  hoes  were  made  by  a  blacksmith  and  were  very  heavy,  some- 
times having  enough  iron  in  one  for  two  or  three  hoes  like  we  use  now. 
Our  axes  were  also  home-made,  and  in  fact  nearly  everything  then  was 
very  different  from  what  it  is  now. 

The  girls  in  those  days  worked  hard  enough  to  raise  corns  on  their 
hands,  wore  home-made  dresses  and  sunbonnets,  and  besides  the  house 
work  also  helped  in  the  field  and  hoed  in  the  garden,  and  had  to  content 
themselves  with  such  flowers  as  the  morning  glory,  hollyhock,  sunflower 
and  pumpkin  blossoms." 

INDIAN  SCARE  OF  1829. 

It  was  customary  in  the  early  days  for  every  male  over  eighteen 
years  of  age  to  have  a  good  trusty  rifle  and  plenty  of  ammunition. 
Shotguns  were  unknown,  also  revolvers.  These  hardy  men  most  gen- 
erally took  their  firearms  with  them  wherever  they  went,  not  for  the 
purpose  though,  be  it  remembered,  to  shoot  one  another,  as  is  often  done 
nowadays,  but  to  defend  themselves  against  the  wild,  untutored  redman, 
who  then  had  their  wigwams  so  close  to  their  borders,  and  occasionally 
made  unexpected  raids  into  the  white  settlements  to  take  vengeance  upon 
the  innocent  and  peaceful  citizen,  for  some  outrage  often  committed  upon 
the  poor  Indian  by  some  of  the  few  bad  white  men,  that  then  had  their 
homes  somewhere  in  these  western  wilds. 

Most  of  the  cruelty  and  butchery  committed  by  the  savages,  in  those 
days,  no  doubt,  were  occasioned  by  the  fact  that  bad  white  men,  either 
instigated  them,  or  had  committed  great  outrages  upon  the  Indians  when 


224  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

they  had  the  advantage  of  them.  And,  they  being  savages,  and  perhaps 
knowing  no  better,  would  take  vengeance  upon  the  first  pale-face  man, 
woman  or  child  that  happened  in  their  pathway.  But  it  is  true,  no  doubt, 
also,  that  these  red  men  of  the  forest  took  great  delight  in  shedding 
blood,  and  gloried  in  taking  the  scalp  of  the  white  man;  and  for  even 
a  fancied  wrong  conjured  up  by  the  brain  of  some  would-be  chieftain, 
they  would  raise  the  war-whoop  and  sally  forth,  seeking  whom  they 
might  devour.  Hence,  when  in  the  year  1829,  these  first  settlers  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  together  with  others  that  had  then  made  Randolph  County 
their  future  home,  heard  from  a  messenger,  fresh  from  the  scene  of  the 
conflict,  his  fiery  charger  foaming,  being  driven  by  the  whip  and  spur 
to  his  utmost  speed,  that  the  Indians  on  the  northern  borders  had  raised 
the  war  club  and  were  marching  rapidly  to  the  settlements,  murdering 
indiscriminately  men,  women  and  children  that  were  then  scattered  along 
in  isolated  settlements  from  the  Iowa  line  down  to  what  is  now  the 
boundary  line  of  Randolph  County. 

The  news  was  carried  from  cabin  to  cabin  by  swift  and  trusty  mes- 
sengers. It  was  appalling,  it  is  true,  and  no  doubt  carried  great  consterna- 
tion to  some.  But  action  was  quickly  taken  and  preparation  made  to 
send  the  women  and  children  down  to  the  big  settlement  in  Howard 
County,  under  charge  of  the  old  and  feeble  men,  not  able  to  do  military 
duty,  where  they  knew  they  would  be  well  protected  and  cared  for  cheer- 
fully. A.  company  of  about  seventy  men,  comprising  nearly  all  the  able- 
bodied  adult  men  in  the  county  was  organized.  Robert  Scounce,  a  highly 
respected  citizen  who  many  years  afterwards  died  in  the  county,  was 
elected  captain,  and  marched  at  once  to  meet  the  enemy.  In  the  mean- 
time a  regiment  was  organized  in  Howard  County,  under  command  of 
Colonel,  later  General  John  B.  Clark,  an  honored  citizen  of  Howard 
County. 

The  Indians  were  driven  without  much  trouble  north  of  the  state 
boundary.  Before  the  expiration  of  these  troubles,  two  other  companies, 
under  command  of  Captain  Abraham  Goodring,  who  was  also  in  the  war 
of  1812,  and  a  highly  respected  citizen  of  the  county,  and  Captain  Robert 
Boucher,  of  Randolph  County.  This  small  war  was  one  of  the  incidents,  it 
was  said,  leading  to  the  famous  Black  Hawk  war. 


CHAPTER  XXIII 

BIOGRAPHICAL 


Ottis  O.  Ash,  M.  D. — ^Among  the  professional  men  of  Randolph 
County  none  is  more  worthy  of  being  represented  in  its  annals  than  Dr. 
Ottis  0.  Ash,  a  leading  physician  and  surgeon  of  Moberly.  For  more  than 
17  years  he  has  lived  within  the  county's  borders,  during  which  time  he 
has  been  a  prominent  factor  in  its  social,  civic  and  professional  affairs. 
Doctor  Ash  was  born  in  Monroe  County,  Mo.,  March  13,  1869,  the  son  of 
W.  P.  and  Hester  (Wilson)  Ash,  being  the  second  of  12  children  born  to 
them. 

W.  P.  Ash  was  born  in  the  same  house  in  Monroe  County,  Mo.,  July  8, 
1843,  and  died  Feb.  11,  1913.  He  was  a  son  of  Robert  and  Mary  (Kess- 
inger)  Ash,  both  born  near  Lexington,  Ky.  They  came  to  Missouri  at  an 
early  day  locating  in  Howard  County,  later  removing  to  Monroe  County 
where  the  grandfather  was  a  farmer.  He  died  in  1875  at  the  advanced 
age  of  80  years,  being  survived  by  his  widow  who  lived  to  be  nearly  100 
years  old.  W.  P.  Ash  was  a  farmer  and  country  merchant,  who  passed 
all  his  days  in  Monroe  County,  now  being  survived  by  his  wife  who  was  a 
native  of  Shelby  County,  Mo.  She  now  resides  at  Madison,  Mo.  She  is 
the  daughter  of  Frank  and  Julia  (Rappwood)  Wilson,  natives  of  Kentucky 
who  were  among  the  earliest  settlers  of  this  state  as  her  father  was  one 
of  the  first  men  to  erect  a  gristmill  in  this  section,  which  was  known  as 
the  Wilson  Mill. 

Doctor  Ash  attended  the  district  school  near  his  home  and  while  yet  a 
young  boy  began  to  clerk  in  his  father's  store.  In  1877  he  entered  the 
high  school  at  Moberly,  finished  there  and  then  took  a  two  year  course 
at  the  State  Normal  School  at  Warrensburg,  Mo.  Following  this,  he 
taught  school  one  year  in  the  district  school  of  Salt  River  township,  Ran- 
dolph County,  but  as  he  had  determined  upon  a  professional  career,  re- 
signed in  the  spring  and  early  in  the  fall  of  1890  entered  Beaumont  Hos- 


226  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

pital  College.  Two  years  later  he  was  granted  a  degree  of  Doctor  of 
Medicine  and  entered  the  Medical  Department  of  Washington  University, 
St.  Louis,  to  take  a  higher  course  in  his  profession,  graduating  there  in 
1894.  He  returned  to  his  home  and  began  practice  at  the  town  of  Ash, 
Monroe  County,  which  had  been  named  after  his  father  who  started  the 
postoffice  of  the  village.  Doctor  Ash  remained  in  this  location  for  ten 
years,  building  up  a  good  practice.  He  gained  the  esteem  and  good  will 
of  all  the  residents  over  a  large  radius  of  the  country  as  he  was  never 
too  busy  or  too  tired  to  respond  to  the  call  of  the  suffering.  His  sympa- 
thetic manner,  kind  heart  and  abilities  won  him  many  life  long  friends. 

In  1902,  Doctor  Ash  took  a  post  graduate  course  and  a  year  later 
came  to  Moberly  and  began  practice  as  he  desired  a  wider  field  for  his 
efforts  and  has  met  with  uniform  success  and  has  an  extensive  practice. 
He  is  a  close  student  of  his  profession,  has  a  fine  medical  library  and  a 
high  reputation  for  skill  and  ability. 

Doctor  Ash  is  a  Democrat  and  served  as  city  physician  in  1904.  He 
is  a  Royal  Arch  Mason.  On  Nov.  30, 1904,  Doctor  Ash  married  Miss  Mazie 
Peterson  who  was  born  at  Grand  Island,  Neb.,  and  they  have  one  daughter, 
Dorothy. 

Dr.-  Ash  is  now  vice-president  of  the  Randolph  County  Trust,  Mob- 
erly, Mo. 

Willard  P.  Cave,  a  leading  member  of  the  Randolph  County  bar  and 
one  of  the  well  known  attorneys  of  this  section  of  the  state  is  a  native 
of  Missouri  and  a  decedent  of  pioneers.  Mr.  Cave  was  born  at  Mexico, 
Mo.,  and  is  a  son  of  Frank  and  Catherine  (Galbreath)  Cave.  Frank  Cave 
was  born  at  Columbia,  Mo.,  and  was  the  son  of  William  and  Mary  Cave, 
pioneer  settlers  of  Boone  County,  Mo.  William  Cave  was  a  son  of  Richard 
Cave  who  with  a  brother,  William  Cave,  came  from  Virginia  and  settled  in 
Boone  County  at  a  very  early  date.  They  platted  the  original  town  ot 
Smithland,  which  is  now  the  city  of  Columbia,  Mo. 

Frank  Cave  was  reared  in  Boone  County,  attending  the  University  of 
Missouri  and  was  a  graduate  of  that  institution.  When  the  Civil  War 
broke  out,  he  resided  at  Natchitoches  Parish,  La.,  where  he  enlisted  in  the 
Confederate  Army  and  served  throughout  the  war.  He  died  in  Audrain 
County,  Mo.,  in  1880,  and  his  wife  died  in  1863  and  her  remains  are  buried 
at  Caddo,  Parish,  La. 

Willard  P,  Cave  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  in  the  Uni- 
versity of  Missouri,  as  were  also  his  father  and  son.  Thus  three  genera- 
tions of  the  Ca,ve  family  are  graduates  of  that  institution. 


HISTOKY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  227 

Willard  P.  Cave  began  the  practice  of  law  in  1883  and  since  that  time 
has  been  successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  in  the  various  state  and 
federal  courts  and  has  established  a  reputation  of  being  one  of  the  able, 
conscientious  and  fearless  lawyers  of  this  section  of  Missouri. 

Mr.  Cave  was  first  married  to  Octavia  Ficklin,  a  daughter  of  Prof. 
Joseph  and  Penelope  (Terrill)  Ficklin,  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased. 
Octavia  Ficklin  Cave  died  in  1892  at  Moberly,  Mo.  and  her  remains  are 
buried  at  Columbia,  Mo.  To  Willard  P.  and  Octavia  (Ficklin)  Cave  were 
born  two  children  as  follows: 

Catherine,  married  Malcolm  McClellan  of  Jacksonville,  Fla.,  and  Helen 
married  Homer  Teachenor  of  Shelbina,  Mo.  Mr.  Cave  was  married  the 
second  time  in  1894  to  Miss  Fannie  Lango  and  to  this  union  has  been  born 
one  son,  Harold,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Missouri  and  now 
taking  a  postgraduate  course  at  Yale. 

Harold  Cave  served  in  the  World  War,  first  entering  the  ser^/ice  as  a 
member  of  an  ambulance  unit  and  reached  France  considerably  in  advance 
of  the  regular  American  Expeditionary  Forces.  There  were  about  28 
members  of  his  unit  and  after  reaching  Paris,  they  took  a  vote  tb  decide 
what  they  would  do  and  25  of  the  number,  including  Harold  Cave,  voted  to 
volunteer  to  serve  with  the  French  Army  which  they  did.  They  served  in 
the  sector  between  Soissons  and  Rheims  for  the  term  of  their  enlistment. 
Later  Mr.  Cave  enlisted  in  the  United  States  navy  where  he  was  serving 
when  the  armistice  was  signed.  He  has  received  a  letter  of  thanks  and 
a  medal  in  appreciation  of  his  services  from  the  French  government. 

Willard  P.  Cave  has  been  identified  with  the  welfare  and  development 
of  Moberly  and  Randolph  County  for  nearly  40  years  and  during  that 
period  has  contributed  much  of  his  time  and  talent  to  the  betterment  and 
upbuilding  of  this  city  and  county.  He  has  served  four  terms  as  mayor 
of  Moberly  and  his  administrations  were  successful  epochs  in  the  history 
of  Moberly  and  marked  for  their  progressiveness. 

The  Mechanics  Savings  Bank  of  Moberly,  Mo.  is  one  of  the  substantial 
financial  institutions  of  this  section  of  Missouri  and  has  stood  the  test  of 
time  with  a  clean  record  throughout  all  the  financial  flurries  of  nearly  half 
a  century.  This  bank  was  organized  in  1872  and  began  business  at  its 
present  location,  208  Reed  St.  The  first  officers  were  M.  N.  Towner, 
president;  Moses  Jennings,  vice-president;  S.  P.  Griffith,  cashier;  and  H. 
P.  Jennings,  assistant  cashier.  The  bank  was  organized  with  an  author- 
ized capital  of  $100,000. 


228  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

The  present  officers  are  H.  P.  Jennings,  president;  J.  B.  Jennings, 
vice-president;  V.  W.  Wilhite,  cashier  and  W.  T.  Smart,  assistant  cashier. 
The  board  of  directors  consists  of  the  above  named  gentlemen  with  the 
exception  of  W.  T.  Smart,  and  J.  C.  O'Keefe  and  Isham  Powell  are  also 
members  of  the  Board  of  Directors.  The  present  capitol  stock  is  $150,000 
and  the  surplus  and  profits  are  $150,000  with  other  additional  reserve 
funds.  The  deposits  are  over  $1,500,000.  The  bank  is  the  owner  of  the 
Merchants  Hotel  block  and  is  located  in  the  northwest  corner  of  that 
building. 

The  changes  in  the  personnel  of  the  officers  of  this  bank  have  been 
few  since  its  organization  in  1872,  and  it  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  care- 
fully managed  and  conservative  banking  institutions  of  the  state.  Mem- 
bers of  the  Jennings  family  have  been  the  dominant  factors  of  this  institu- 
tion since  its  organization.  Moses  Jennings,  the  first  vice-president  was 
the  grandfather  of  J.  B.  Jennings,  the  present  vice-president  and  the 
father  of  H.  P.  Jennings. 

The  bank  fixtures  are  modern  and  every  convenience  is  provided  for 
the  many  patrons  and  every  safety  device  known  in  the  modern  banking  in 
the  way  of  mechanical  contrivances  is  here  installed.  The  steel  vault  is  of 
the  best  material  and  construction  that  money  can  buy  and  the  door  of  the 
vault  alone  weighs  three  and  one-half  tons. 

J.  B.  Jennings,  vice-president  of  the  Mechanics  Savings  Bank  and  one 
of  the  well  known  bankers  of  this  section  of  the  state  was  born  at  West 
Union,  W.  Va.  and  is  the  son  of  Hiram  and  Emely  (Davis)  Jennings,  the 
former  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  the  latter  of  Virginia.  Mr.  Jennings 
is  a  descendant  of  old  Virginia  stock,  including  the  Randolph  and  Davis 
families.  Hiram  Jennings  came  to  Missouri  with  his  family  in  1874  and 
settled  at  Moberly.  Here  he  was  engaged  in  the  dry  goods  and  grocery 
and  lumber  business  during  his  active  business  career  and  met  with  suc- 
cess and  during  his  time  was  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  this 
section.  He  died  in  1898  and  his  wife  died  in  1895.  Their  remains  are 
buried  in  West  Union,  W.  Va.  They  were  the  parents  of  one  other  child 
besides  J.  B.  Clara,  who  is  now  the  widow  of  W.  L.  Irwin  and  resides  in 
Kansas  City,  Mo.  Three  brothers  are  deceased:  William,  Howard,  and 
the  youngest  who  died  in  infancy. 

J.  B.  Jennings  received  his  education  in  the  high  school  of  Moberly 
and  in  1879  entered  the  Mechanics  Savings  Bank  and  has  been  connected 
with  this  institution  continuously  until  the  present  time.    Nothwithstand- 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  229 

ing,  Mr.  Jenning's  career  has  has  been  first  of  all  that  of  a  banker,  he  has 
always  found  time  to  devote  a  portion  of  his  time  to  public  and  civic  affairs, 
and  take  a  good  citizens  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  community.  He 
served  as  treasurer  of  the  city  of  Moberly  for  18  years  and  for  12  years 
w.as  treasurer  of  the  Moberly  School  Board.  He  has  been  prominently 
identified  with  the  Missouri  Banker's  Association  for  a  number  of  years 
and  at  various  times  has  served  as  treasurer,  vice-president  and  president 
of  that  organization.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American  Banker's  Associa- 
tion and  at  the  present  time  is  a  member  of  the  executive  council  of  that 
organization. 

Mr.  Jennings  was  married  in  1896  to  Miss  Frances  W.  Wight,  a  daugh-.' 
ter  of  James  W.,  Sr.  and  Auleria  (Fullenwider)  Wight,  of  Moberly.  further 
mention  of  whom  is  made  in  this  volume.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jennings  have 
been  born  two  children.  The  elder,  Howard  Wight,  age  21  years,  is  now 
a  student  in  the  University  of  Colorado,  at  Boulder,  Colo.  He  began  mili- 
tary training  at  the  age  of  13  years  and  when  he  was  21  years  of  age,  he 
was  captain  of  Company  I  at  Boulder,  Colo.  The  younger  child,  Frances 
E.  is  at  home  with  her  parents.  Mr.  Jenning's  home  is  located  at  520  W. 
Rollins  Street  on  the  site  of  the  old  Jennings  home  which  was  destroyed 
by  fire  where  his  parents  lived  for  20  years. 

Alexander  M.  Mounce,  Jr.,  bookkeeper  for  the  D.  H.  Mounce  Lumber 
Company,  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  one  of  the  progressive  young  men  of  Randolph 
County,  who  turned  from  the  peaceful  pursuits  of  business  life  when  the 
United  States  entered  the  World  War  and  served  during  the  remainder  of 
that  great  conflict. 

Alexander  M.  Mounce,  Jr.,  was  born  at  Bunker  Hill,  Kan.,  April  18, 
1888,  and  is  a  son  of  Alexander  M.  and  Martha  (Monson)  Mounce,  the 
latter  of  whom  is  now  deceased,  having  departisd  this  life  in  October,  1914, 
and  her  remains  are  buried  in  Woodland  Cemetery,  Moberly,  Mo.  The 
father  resides  in  Moberly  which  has  been  his  home  for  the  past  30  years 
and  a  sketch  of  him  appears  in  this  volume. 

Alex.  M.  Mounce,  Jr.,  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Moberly,  Missouri  State  University  at  Columbia,  Mo.,  and  the  University 
of  Chicago,  Chicago,  111.  In  1912  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  D.  H. 
Mounce  Lumber  Company  at  Hoberly  as  bookkeeper  and  was  thus  em- 
ployed until  Dec.  13,  1917,  when  he  enlisted  in  the  Aviation  Corps  of  the 
United  States  Army.  Shortly  after  enlisting,  he  was  sent  to  Camp  Custer 
at  Battle  Creek,  Mich.    After  spending  seven  weeks  there,  he  was  trans- 


230  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

ferred  to  Barron  Field,  Fort  Worth,  Texas,  where  he  served  with  the  fly- 
ing and  engineering  department  of  the  aviation  service  until  Marcn  28, 
1919,  when  he  was  honorably  discharged.  Mr.  Mounce  then  returned  to 
Moberly  and  resumed  his  former  position  with  the  D.  H.  Mounce  Lumber 
Company  and  is  now  serving  in  that  capacity. 

A.  M.  Mounce  of  the  D.  H.  Mounce  Lumber  Company  is  one  of  the 
enterprising  business  men  of  Moberly.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri,  ha'v- 
ing  been  born  at  Florida,  Monroe  County,  June  18,  1848.  He  is  the  son 
of  Samuel  and  Elizabeth  (Bryant)  Mounce,  the  former  a  native  of  Lincoln 
County,  Ky.,  and  the  latter  of  Virginia.  Samuel  Mounce  came  to  Missouri 
and  settled  in  Monroe  County  about  1820  and  was  there  married  and  spent 
the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  was  a  cabinet  maker  and  also  owned  and 
operated  a  farm  in  Monroe  County.  Hfe  died  in  1864.  His  wife  preceded 
him  in  death  a  number  of  years,  having  died  in  1849. 
"'^  To  Samuel  and  Elizabeth  (Bryant)  Mounce  were  born  the  following 
cMldren:  John  W.,  who  was  an  accountant  and  vice-president  of  the 
Bank  of  Hannibal,  died  at  Hannibal,  Mo.,  in  1917 ;  Mary  C,  married  David 
Hendricks,  who  is  now  deceased  and  she  resides  in  the  state  of  Washing- 
ton; Sarah  Mariah,  married  Thomas  Sheriman  and  they  reside  at  Fresno, 
Calif. ;  Lucy  Ann,  widow  of  Richard  Robey,  Monroe  City,  Mo. ;  David  Henry, 
senior  member  of  the  D.  H.  Mounce  Lumber  Company,  and  A.  M.,  the 
subject  of  this  sketch. 

A.  M.  Mounce  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  when  about  16 
years  old,  in  1864,  he  entered  the  dry  goods  business  at  Shelbina,  Mo., 
and  for  ten  years  was  thus  engaged.  He  then  went  to  Hannibal,  where  he 
was  engaged  in  the  same  business  until  1885,  when  he  went  to  Clarks- 
ville,  Mo.  and  was  engaged  in  business  there  and  later  at  Louisiana  and 
Mexico,  Mo.  He  then  went  to  Bunker  Hill,  Kans.,  where  he  remained 
until  1889,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  since  that  time  has  been  identi- 
fied with  the  D.  H.  Mounce' Lumber  Company  and  for  30  years  his  inter- 
ests has  been  with  this  concern.  The  D.  H.  Mounce  Lumber  Company  is 
one  of  the  leaders  in  lumber  and  other  building  supplies  in  this  section  of 
the  state.  The  business  is  located  on  the  comer  of  Weightman  and 
Sturgeon  streets. 

A.  M.  Mounce  was  married  first  in  1871  to  Miss  Mattie  Monson  of 
Shelbina,  Mo.,  and  to  this  union  the  following  children  were  born :  Edna, 
Washington,  D.  C,  Mrs.  Goldena  Terrill,  Moberly,  Mo.,  Mrs.  Margaret 
Lynch,  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Alexander  M.,  Jr.,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in 


HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  231 

this  volume;  Stella  deceased,  and  Fay,  deceased.  The  mother  of  these 
children  died  in  1914  and  Mr.  Mounce  was  united  in  marriage  Sept.  25, 
1919,  with  Jannie  Burton,  of  Moberly,  Mo.  and  they  reside  at  600  West 
Carpenter  Street,  Moberly,  Mo. 

Mr.  Mounce  is  a  Democrat  and  has  always  taken  a  commendable  inter- 
est in  political  matters  and  public  affairs.  While  a  resident  of  Bunker 
Hill,  Kan.,  he  served  as  councilman  and  when  he  lived  in  Shelby  County 
was  a  candidate  for  circuit  clerk  of  that  county. 

Major  J.  Lilly,  a  prominent  member  of  the  Randolph  County  b^r,  who 
is  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Moberly,  is  a  native  of 
Randolph  County  and  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  this 
section  of  the  state.  He  was  born  in  this  county  March  25,  1872,  and  is 
the  son  of  James  Madison  and  Margaret  (Orr)  Lilly. 

James  Madison  Lilly  was  a  native  of  Kentucky,  born  in  Oldham 
County,  Ky.,  in  1816.  He  came  to  Missouri  in  1836  and  first  settled  in 
Marion  County,  where  he  remained  two  years.  In  1838  he  came  to  Ran- 
dolph County,  which  has  been  the  home  of  the  Lilly  family  to  the  present 
time.  James  Madison  Lilly  followed  blacksmithing  and  also  worked  as  a 
stone  mason.  He  was  also  engaged  in  farming  for  a  considerable  time. 
He  died  Aug.  8,  1900.  His  wife,  Margaret  (Orr)  Lilly,  was  born  in  Wash- 
ington County,  Va.,  Jan.  2,  1835,  and  died  Sept.  15,  1903. 

To  James  Madison  and  Margaret  (Orr)  Lilly,  were  born  the  following 
children:  Charles  W.,  a  farmer  of  Randolph  County;  Joseph,  who  form- 
erly served  as  superintendent  of  the  public  schools  of  Moberly;  Henry  L., 
a  farmer  in  Randolph  County;  Nora,  married  Omer  Hendricks  of  Monroe 
County,  Mo.,  and  Major  J.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Major  J.  Lilly  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  received  his  edu- 
cation in  the  public  schools  and  the  State  Normal  School  at  Kirksville,  Mo. 
He  began  his  career  as  teacher  in  1890.  He  served  as  school  commissioner 
of  Randolph  County  for  two  years,  and  at  the  same  time  was  engaged  in 
teaching  in  the  Moberly  public  schools.  Later  he  served  as  superintendent 
of  public  schools  at  Unionville,  Mo.  In  1898  Mr.  Lilly  was  elected  clerk 
of  the  Circuit  Court  in  Randolph  County,  and  in  1902  he  was  re-elected  to 
that  office,  serving  eight  years  in  all.  During  that  time  he  studied  law 
and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1901.  At  the  expiration  of  his  second  term 
of  office,  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  and  has  successfully  devoted 
himself  to  his  profession  in  this  county  for  the  past  20  years,  and  is  re- 
garded as  one  of  the  foremost  lawyers  of  this  section  of  the  State. 


232  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Mr.  Lilly  is  a  Democrat  and  stands  high  in  the  councils  of  his  party. 
He  has  served  two  terms  as  a  member  of  the  State  Democratic  Committee. 
In  1918  he  was  a  candidate  in  the  primary  for  judge  of  the  Kansas  City 
Court  of  Appeals  and  was  the  second  in  the  list  of  four  candidates. 

Mr.  Lilly  was  united  in  marriage  July  17,  1901,  to  Miss  Irma  Ragland 
of  Monroe  County,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Frank  B.  and  Letitia  (Bas- 
sett)  Ragland,  the  former  of  whom  is  now  deceased.  He  was  identified 
with  the  agricultural  industries  of  Monroe  County  for  many  years.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lilly  have  been  born  two  children :  Margaret  and  Frank. 

Mr.  Lilly  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  is  a  Knights 
Templar  Mason  and  a  representative  to  the  Grand  Lodge  of  Louisiana. 
He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and 
Past  Exalted  Ruler  of  Moberly  Lodge  No.  936. 

John  N.  Hamilton,  a  prominent  member  of  the  Randolph  County  bar 
and  a  well  known  attorney  throughout  central  Missouri,  has  been  a  prom- 
inent factor  in  the  affairs  of  this  section  for  many  years  and  has  been 
successful  in  the  many  fields  of  endeavor  to  which  he  has  given  his  atten- 
tion. Mr.  Hamilton  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and  comes  from  a 
family  of  prominent  pioneers  of  this  state.  He  was  bom  on  a  farm  in 
Prairie  township,  April  22,  1854,  and  is  a  son  of  Dr.  Thomas  L.  and 
Cynthia  A.  (Christian)  Hamilton. 

Dr.  Thomas  L.  Hamilton  was  born  in  Williamson  County,  Tenn.,  May 
17,  1825  and  was  a  son  of  Dr.  John  B.  Hamilton  and  Nancy  (Campbell) 
Hamilton,  natives  of  Kentucky  who  lived  near  the  Tennessee  state  line, 
pear  Mammoth  Cave.  The  family  moved  to  Green,  Ky.  when  Thomas  L. 
Hamilton  was  a  child.  Dr.  John  B.  Hamilton  practiced  medicine  in  that 
vicinity  for  many  years  and  in  1846  came  to  Prairie  township,  Randolph 
County,  Mo.  with  his  family  and  later  located  in  Gallatin,  Mo.  After  the 
death  of  Dr.  John  B.  Hamilton's  first  wife,  he  married  Caroline  Sanders. 
Dr.  Thomas  L.  Hamilton  received  a  good  preparatory  education  and  early 
in  life  began  the  study  of  medicine  under  the  direction  of  his  father.  He 
took  his  first  course  of  lectures  at  the  McDowell  Medical  Institute  in  the 
winter  of  1849-50.  In  1850,  he  began  the  practice  of  his  profession  near 
Renick,  Randolph  County,  and  with  the  exception  of  about  three  years, 
spent  at  Davids  and  one  year  in  St.  Louis  County  and  about  a  year  in 
Huntsville,  during  the  Civil  War,  he  was  engaged  in  the  practice  in  that 
locality  until  his  death  in  1894.  In  addition  to  his  practice  he  was  also 
interested  in  the  mercantile  business  for  a  number  of  years  and  conducted 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  233 

a  drug  and  dry  goods  store.  He  took  a  prominent  part  in  local  affairs  of 
his  day  and  served  as  mayor  of  Renick  and  was  president  of  the  school 
board  there. 

Dr.  Thomas  L.  Hamilton  was  married  Dec.  18,  1850  to  Cynthia  A. 
Christian,  daughter  of  N.  B.  and  Martha  C.  Christian  and  to  that  union  the 
following  children  were  born:  Cora,  married  Rev.  J.  W.  Terrill,  president 
of  Mt.  Pleasant  College  which  was  located  at  Huntsville  and  they  are  both 
now  deceased;  John  N.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  William  T.,  a  farmer 
and  merchant  of  Randolph  County;  Carrie  E.,  married  E.  B.  Pennington,  of 
Birmingham,  Ala. ;  James  P.,  president  of  the  Lozier-Rowe  Abstract  Com- 
pany of  Kansas  City,  Mo. ;  Ollie,  married  Oscar  Craig,  who  is  now  deceased 
and  left  one  child,  Lawrence  Craig  who  is  now  a  student  in  Drake  Uni- 
versity at  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  and  Ida  F.,  who  is  now  the  widow  of  John 
Davin  and  resides  in  Kansas  City,  Mo.  Dr.  Hamilton  was  a  Mason  and  a 
member  of  the  Christian  church. 

John  N.  Hamilton  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  educated  in  the 
public  schools  and  Mt.  Pleasant  College  at  Huntsville.  He  then  studied 
law  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1875.  He  began  his  professional  career 
at  Renick  and  in  1885,  located  at  Huntsville  which  has  since  been  his 
home.  Notwithstanding  the  fact  that  Mr.  Hamilton  has  always  had  a 
large  law  practice,  he  is  extensively  interested  in  other  entei-prises.  On 
Feb.  1,  1911  he  purchased  the  Huntsville  "Herald"  which  is  a  $10,000 
coiTDoration  known  as  the  Hamilton  Publishing  Company  .The  "Herald" 
is  an  influential  newspaper  of  wide  circulation.  Mr.  Hamilton  also  organ- 
ized and  incorporated  the  Hamilton  Abstract  Company.  This  company 
was  incorporated  in  1909.  He  was  also  one  of  the  promoters  and  in- 
corporation known  as  the  Hamilton  Publishing  Company.  The  "Herald" 
incorporated  and  is  president  and  manager  of  the  Hamilton  estate,  a 
$50,000  corporation.  He  is  the  owner  of  considerable  real  estate  and 
interested  in  other  enterprises,  including  the  Hamilton  and  Company  In- 
surance agency. 

Mr.  Hamilton  was  united  in  marriage  Dec.  6,  1897  with  Miss  Susan 
C.  Maupin,  of  Renick,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  L.  D.  and  Nannie  (Moore) 
Maupin,  natives  of  Monroe  County,  Mo,  where  the  father  was  a  carpenter 
and  wagon  maker. 

Mr.  Hamilton  is  a  Democrat  and  is  prominent  in  the  councils  of  his 
party.     In  1890  he  was  elected  recorder  of  deeds  in  Randolph  County  and 


234  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

iin  1894  was  reelected  to  that  office  and  served  two  terms.  He  served  as 
city  attorney  of  Huntsville  for  four  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights 
of  Pythias  and  the  Christian  church. 

The  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank,  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  one  of  the  sub- 
stantial iinancial  institutions  of  Randolph  County  which  has  had  a  marked 
development  and  phenomenal  success  since  its  organization  in  1913.  The 
officers  at  the  organization  of  this  bank  were  A.  Vince,  president;  R.  A. 
Curran,  vice-president;  J.  W.  Bundridge,  cashier  and  V.  E.  Bundridge,  as- 
sistant cashier.  The  first  directors  were :  Abe  Vince,  R.  A.  Curran,  J.  W. 
Bundridge,  E.  P.  Newman,  T.  J.  Jones,  J.  T.  Sheahan,  and  V.  E.  Bundridge. 
The  bank  was  organized  with  a  capitol  stock  of  $30,000. 

The  present  officers  of  the  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank  are:  J.  W. 
Bundridge,  president;  R.  A.  Curran,  vice-president;  V.  E.  Bundridge, 
cashier;  J.  W.  Sours,  assistant  cashier;  Abe  Vince,  chairman  of  the  Board 
of  Directors  which  is  composed  of  the  above  officials  of  the  bank  and  T.  J. 
Jones,  J.  T.  Sheahan  and  E.  P.  Newman. 

The  capitol  stock  has  been  increased  to  $75,000  since  the  organization 
of  the  bank.     The  surplus  is  $25,000  and  the  deposits  are  over  $700,000. 

The  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank  is  a  conservatively  conducted  bank- 
ing institution  and  the  officers  and  directors  are  all  substantial  men  of 
affairs  whose  integrity  and  capabilities  are  well  known  to  the  Moberly  and 
Randolph  County  public. 

J.  W.  Bundridge,  president  of  the  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank  of 
Moberly  is  a  well  known  and  successful  banker  and  has  been  engaged  in 
the  banking  business  since  early  manhood.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri 
and  was  born  in  Macon  County,  Oct.  30,  1881.  He  is  the  son  of  John  C. 
and  Delana  (Campbell)  Bundridge,  who  now  reside  at  Bucklin,  Mo.  They 
are  the  parents  of  two  children,  J.  W.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  and  V. 
E.,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume. 

J.  W.  Bundridge  was  educated  in  the  public  schools,  and  after  attend- 
ing the  Brookfield  High  School,  he  took  a  course  in  the  State  Normal 
School  at  Kirksville,  Mo.  and  later  attended  the  Chillicothe  Business  Col- 
lege. 

Mr.  Bundridge  began  his  banking  career  shortly  after  leaving  the 
school  at  Browning,  Mo.  In  1905  he  organized  the  bank  at  New  Boston, 
Mo.,  and  in  1910  he  organized  the  Citizens  Bank  at  Bucklin,  Mo.  In  1913, 
he  disposed  of  his  interests  in  the  Citizens  Bank  and  organized  the  Farm- 
ers and  Merchants  Bank  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  to  which  he  has  since  devoted 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  235 

his  attention  and  which  is  now  one  of  the  successful  financial  institutions 
of  Randolph  County. 

Mr.  Bundridge  was  married  in  May,  1905  to  Miss  Sylvia  D.  Bums  of 
Green  City,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  George  S.  Burns,  who  is  now  de- 
ceased as  is  also  his  wife.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bundbridge  has  been  bom  one 
son,  Eldon. 

Mr.  Bundridge  is  a  member  of  the  Modem  Woodmen  of  America  and 
the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Elks.  Mr.  Bundridge  is  essentially  a  banker 
and  has  made  an  unqualified  success  in  his  chosen  field  of  endeavor. 

V.  E:  Bundridge,  casliier  of  the  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank  of  Mob- 
erly  was  bom  in  Linn  County,  Mo.,  July  28,  1890  and  is  the  son  of  J.  C. 
and  Delana  (Campbell)  Bundridge,  now  residents  of  Bucklin,  Mo. 

V.  E.  Bundridge  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools,  including 
a  course  in  the  Brookfield  lligh  School.  Later  he  took  a  course  in  the 
Chillicothe  Business  College  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in 
1908. 

Since  leaving  school  Mr.  Bundridge  has  been  engaged  in  the  banking- 
business.  He  was  first  connected  with  the  Citizens  Bank  of  Bucklin,  Mo. 
He  was  also  identified  with  banks  of  Browning  and  Brookfield,  Mo.  In 
1913  he  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank 
at  Moberly  and  at  the  organization  of  this  institution  he  became  assistant 
cashier  and  on  Dec.  1,  1919  he  became  cashier  of  the  bank  and  has  cap- 
ably filled  that  position  to  the  present  time.  Alt?.ough  a  young  man,  Mr. 
Bundridge  has  had  an  extensive  experience  in  the  banking  business  and  is 
well  qualified  for  the  responsible  position  which  he  holds. 

Mr.  Bundridge  was  married  April  8,  1916  to  Miss  Mary  Cecil  Ingram, 
of  Moberly,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  J.  W.  and  Martha  (Enslen)  Ingram, 
of  Moberly,  Mo.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bundridge  has  been  born  one  daughter, 
Martha  Delana. 

Mr.  Bundridge  is  a  member  of  the  Moberly  Lodge,  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  is  the  present  treasurer  of  the  Moberly 
Board  of  Education. 

Jerry  M.  Jefferies,  a  well  known  and  successful  attorney  of  Moberly, 
is  a  native  of  Missouri  and  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  early  pioneer  families 
of  this  state.  He  is  the  son  of  William  M.  and  Sarah  E.  (Smallwood) 
Jefferies,  the  former  a  native  of  Lewis  County,  Mo.,  which  is  the  same 
county  in  which  Jerry  M.  Jefferies,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  bom. 
The  mother  is  a  native  of  Indiana.     Jerry  Meridith,  grandfather  of  the 


( 
236  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

subject  of  this  sketch,  was  a  native  of  Faquier  County,  Va.,  and  a  pioneer 
settler  of  Lewis  County,  Mo.  When  he  settled  in  that  county,  he  entered 
government  land  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  there. 

Jerry  M.  Jefferies  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Lewis  County  and  the  La  Grange  Baptist  College.  He  then 
entered  the  St.  Louis  Law  School  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution 
in  1899.  In  1900,  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Can- 
ton, Mo.  and  was  thus  engaged  until  1910.  He  then  came  to  Moberly  and 
took  up  the  practice  of  law  here  and  was  successful  from  the  start.  Dur- 
ing the  ten  years  that  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Randolph  County,  he  has 
built  up  a  large  practice,  acquired  an  extensive  acquaintance  and  stands 
high  with  the  members  of  the  legal  profession  and  the  citizens  of  Randolph 
County.  Two  years  after  coming  to  this  county,  Mr.  Jefferies  was  elected 
prosecuting  attorney  and  at  the  expiration  of  his  first  term  was  re-elected 
to  succeed  himself,  serving  in  that  important  office  from  1913  to  1917. 

James  Winter  Wight,  a  prominent  attorney  of  Moberly  who  has  been 
successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  for  the  past  26  years  is  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  able  lawyers  of  central  Missouri.  He  is  and  has  been 
identified  with  the  interests  of  Randolph  County  in  many  ways  and  bears 
the  distinction  of  having  served  as  prosecuting  attorney  of  Randolph 
County  longer  than  any  other  man  that  ever  held  that  office. 

Mr.  Wight  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County  and  is  a  member  of 
one  of  its  old  and  distinguished  pioneer  families,  members  of  which  played 
a  conspicuous  part  in  the  early  settlement  and  development  of  Missouri 
which  is  more  fully  set  forth  in  the  biographical  sketch  of  James  Frances 
Ratcliiff  Wight,  grandfather  of  James  Winter  Wight  which  will  be  found 
elsewhere  in  this  volume.  James  Winter  Wight  was  born  at  Wightland  in 
Randolph  County,  July  1,  1869.  He  is  the  only  son  born  to  James  William 
and  Aurelia  T.  (Fullinwider)  Wight,  now  residents  of  the  city  of  Moberly 
and  of  whom  more  extensive  mention  is  made  in  this  volume. 

James  W.  Wight  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  received  a  good 
preliminary  education  in  the  public  schools  of  this  county.  He  then 
entered  Central  College  at  Fayette,  Mo.,  where  he  took  a  course,  after 
which  he  attended  Washington  University  in  St.  Louis  and  then  attended 
the  University  of  Missouri  at  Columbia  where  he  was  graduated  from  the 
law  department.  While  a  student  at  the  latter  institution  he  was  awarded 
the  Stephens  medal  for  oratory.  After  completing  his  law  course  he  was 
admitted  to  practice  at  Moberly  and  since  that  time  has  been  actively 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  237 

engaged  in  the  practice  and  numbers  among  his  clients  some  of  the  leading 
men  of  affairs  and  business  institutions  of  this  county.  He  is  a  close 
student  of  the  law  and  a  capable  trial  lawyer. 

Mr.  Wight  is  a  Democrat  and  has  ever  taken  a  keen  interest  and 
active  part  in  matters  pertaining  to  politics  of  a  local,  state  and  national 
character.  He  fi^st  served  as  prosecuting  attorney  of  Randolph  County 
by  appointment  from  Gov.  Joseph  Folk  to  fill  out  the  unexpired  term  of 
the  late  Harry  LaMotte.  After  serving  that  term  he  was  elected  to  that 
ofRce  for  two  terms  in  succession.  He  was  again  elected  to  the  office  of 
prosecuting  attorney  in  1916,  serving  one  term  and  thus  he  has  served 
nearly  four  full  terms  in  the  office  of  prosecuting  attorney  which  is  the 
record  for  long  service  in  that  office  in  Randolph  County.  He  made  a  good 
record  for  all  the  years  that  he  was  prosecuting  attorney  and  he  was 
always  fair,  as  well  as  fearless,  in  the  matter  of  law  enforcement.  While 
Mr.  Wight  has  had  a  busy  professional  career  he  has  also  been  interested 
in  other  fields  of  endeavor  and  among  other  things  he  has  been  interested 
in  the  management  of  the  old  homestead  of  the  Wight  family  in  Randolph 
County,  known  as  Wightland.  This  is  a  splendid  estate  consisting  of  500 
acres  of  valuable  land. 

Mr.  Wight  was  united  in  marriage  Dec.  1,  1892  with  Miss  Elma  Smith, 
of  Palmyra,  Mo.,  a  daughter  of  John  A.  and  Ellen  (Gardner)  Smith.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wight  have  been  bom  three  children:  Florence  Loraine, 
married  Paul  Stephenson  of  Moberly,  Mo. ;  James  Augustine,  who  is  now  a 
student  in  Central  College  at  Fayette,  Mo.  and  Francis  Mildred,  resides  at 
home  with  her  parents  in  Moberly. 

During  the  World  War,  Mr.  Wight  served  in  the  capacity  of  Govern- 
ment Appeal  Agent.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks,  and  he  and  Mrs.  Wight  are  members  of  the  Methodist 
Church,  South. 

James  William  Wight,  a  prominent  citizen  of  Randolph  County,  now 
living  retired  at  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  this  county  and  is  the  only  son 
born  to  James  Francis  Ratcliff  Wight  and  Frances  and  Burton  Wight.  A 
sketch  of  James  Francis  Ratcliflf  Wight  appears  in  this  volume.  James 
William  Wight  was  born  in  Randolph  County,  June  13,  1842,  and  has  spent 
practically  all  his  life  in  his  native  county.  He  was  given  more  than 
ordinary  educational  advantages.  He  attended  Mount  Pleasant  College  in 
Randolph  County,  graduating  with  the  highest  honors  of  the  class  and 
being  chosen  by  tt»e  president  of  the  school  from  among  the  entire  list  to 


238  HISTOKY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

deliver  the  valedictory  address.  Subsequently  he  was  again  chosen  to  de- 
liver an  address  about  two  years  later,  at  which  time  he  was  awarded 
the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts.  Mr.  Wight's  career  as  an  active  business 
man  was  largely  devoted  to  the  beautiful  old  country  estate  of  Wightland 
in  Randolph  County. 

An  influential  Democrat,  he  was  elected  and  served  for  eight  years  as 
clerk  of  the  Randolph  County  Court.  Mr.  Wight  is  one  of  the  prominent 
laymen  of  the  Southern  Methodist  Church  of  the  county,  having  served  as 
recording  steward,  church  treasurer,  steward,  district  steward,  Sunday 
school,  superintendent,  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  church  prop- 
erty, chairman  of  said  board  of  the  church  in  Moberly.  He  holds  the  office 
of  chairman  of  the  board  of  trustees  at  the  present  time.  His  only  fra- 
ternal or  social  relation  is  with  the  Order  of  Good  Templars. 

On  May  12,  1868,  Mr.  Wight  was  married  in  Shelby  County,  Kentucky 
to  Aurelia  Tevis  Fullinwidei'.  She  was  educated  at  Science  Hall,  Shelby- 
ville,  Ky.  Her  parents  were  Henry  Winter  and  Jane  Amanda  (Shipman) 
Fullinwider.  Her  grandfather  Jacob  Fullin wider  was  born, at  Hagerstown, 
Md.,  in  1767,  moved  with  his  father  to  Kentucky  in  1783  and  on  the  fron- 
tier of  Kentucky  became  noted  as  one  of  the  great  Indian  fighters.  Later 
he  served  in  the  last  campaign  of  "Mad"  Anthony  Wayne  against  the 
Indians  of  the  Northwest.  Rev.  Peter  Fullinwider,  father  of  Jacob  and 
great  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Wight,  settled  at  Hagerstown,  Md.,  in  1852. 
He  was  a  Reformed  Presbyterian  minister,  and  one  of  the  great  desires 
of  his  life  was  to  preach  the  gospel  to  the  Indians.  It  was  on  this  mission 
that  he  sought  the  bordering  countries  in  the  same  year  that  peace  was 
declared  between  Great  Britian  and  tYie  colonies  and  only  a  short  time 
after  George  Rogers  Clarke  and  his  Virginia  soldiers  had  conquered  the 
Ohio  valley  and  made  a  permanent  part  of  the  colonial  possessions.  Rev. 
Peter  Fullinwider  was  a  great  power  for  good  during  his  generation,  and 
one  of  the  most  noted  of  the  early  ministers  of  the  gospel  in  the  west. 
He  died  in  Shelby  County  in  1799  and  was  buried  under  the  house,  safe 
from  Indian  scalp-hunters. 

The  old  bible  which  is  now  in  possession  of  one  of  the  great  grand- 
daughters was  brought  from  Switzerland  in  1752,  and  was  carried  by  him 
in  all  his  wanderings,  wrapped  in  a  buckskin,  taking  part  in  many  pic- 
turesque incidents  in  his  remarkable  career.  To  him  it  was  the  cherished 
treasure  of  his  heart.  Although  it  weighed  30  pounds,  it  was  carried  on 
horseback  all  over  the  country  and  from  its  pages  the  little  congregations. 


HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  239 

of  Wights,  Rice's  and  many  of  the  other  forts  were  taught  the  gospel. 
Many  were  the  Indians  that  listened  to  his  translation  from  this  book,  for 
he  tried  to  study  their  language  as  far  as  possible.  In  old  age  it  was  for 
years  his  custom  to  sit  at  the  table  and  read  from  this  cherished  volume, 
and  daily  he  could  be  seen,  his  silvery  locks  falling  over  his  shoulders, 
stooping  over  the  book,  enjoying  its  promises  and  enraptured  with  its 
beauties.  One  morning  when  his  little  grandsons  were  tiny  boys  playing 
about  the  room  with  their  little  sisters  and  cousins,  the  venerable  grand- 
father was  found  to  be  dead  with  his  face  in  the  old  Bible.  "God  hath 
taken  him  thus,"  it  was  said. 

There  are  two  children  of  Mr.  Wight  and  wife :  James  Winter  Wight, 
further  mention  of  whom  is  made  in  this  volume  and  Frances  Amanda 
Wight  who  was  born  at  Wightland,  Randolph  County,  Oct.  7,  1876.  She 
received  her  education  at  Central  Female  College  at  Lexington  and  was 
married  to  John  B.  Jennings,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume. 

Roy  W.  Edwards,  a  well  known  jeweler  of  Moberly,  and  a  veteran  of 
the  World  War,  is  a  native  of  Nebraska.  He  was  bom  at  Dubois,  Neb., 
March  12,  1891,  and  is  the  son  of  William  Henry  and  Julia  (Downs) 
"Edwards.  William  Henry  Edwards  was  a  native  of  Newcastle,  Pa.  He 
went  to  Nebraska  when  he  was  21  years  of  age,  where  he  worked  at  his 
trade,  which  was  that  of  a  jeweler  and  watchmaker  and  spent  the  re- 
mainder of  his  life  there.  He  died  Dec.  19,  1911,  and  his  remains  was 
buried  ,at  Dubois,  Neb.  His  wife  was  a  native  of  Connecticut  and  they 
were  married  in  Nebraska.     She  died  in  1890  and  is  also  buried  at  Dubois. 

Roy  W.  Edwards  is  one  of  the  following  children  born  to  his  parents ; 
Andrew  W.,  who  served  in  the  United  States  navy  in  the  Atlantic  fleet, 
enlisting  in  1917,  and  served  until  the  close  of  the  war,  now  residing  at 
Lincoln,  Neb.;  Chole,  married  Robert  Whithorne,  and  died  at  Vallejo, 
Cal.;  and  Roy  W.,  whose  name  introduces  this  sketch. 

Mr.  Edwards  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Alva,  Okla.  and 
the  Northwestern  Normal  School.  He  learned  the  trade  of  jeweler  at 
the  Bradley  Polytechnic  at  Peoria,  111.,  and  since  1910,  he  has  v/orked 
at  that  trade  with  the  exception  of  the  period  spent  in  the  United  States 
Army  during  the  World  War.  He  enlisted  at  Moberly,  March  17,  1918, 
in  the  56th  Engineers,  and  was  sent  to  Washington  Barracks,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C.  for  training.  His  unit  sailed  for  France,  July  8,  1918,  and  on 
July  22,  1918,  he  landed  at  Brest,  France.  After  five  weeks  training, 
near  Paris,  they  were  sent  to  the  front  and  spent  20  days  on  the  front 


240  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

line.  Mr.  Edwards  was  in  searchlight  work  and  was  stationed  near  the 
Meuse  at  the  time  the  armistice  was  signed.  He  remained  in  France 
until  March  14,  1919,  when  he  returned  to  America  and  received  his 
honorable  discharge  at  Camp  Taylor,  Ky.,  March  27,  1919,  and  is  now 
connected  with  the  Burklund  Jewelery  Store  at  Moberly. 

Mr.  Edwards  was  married  July  22,  1914  to  Miss  Estell  J.  (iraff,  of 
Ashland,  111.     She  is  a  daughter  of  Frank  Graff,  of  Ashland. 

Mr.  Edwards  was  a  charter  member  of  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  No.  6, 
American  Legion  and  was  the  first  treasurer  of  the  local  organization 
and  the  second  commander  of  the  Post,  which  position  he  holds  at  the 
present  time.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  of  Michigan 
City,  Ind.  and  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons  of  Moberly.  He  is 
a  progressive  young  man  and  has  a  wide  acquaintance  and  many  friends 
in  Moberly  and  Randolph  County. 

John  H.  Nebergall,  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  popular  conductors 
on  the  Wabash  Railroad  and  the  president  of  the  Moberly  Steam  Laundry 
Company,  was  bom  in  Ross  County,  Ohio,  June  24,  1854,  the  son  of  James 
and  Mary  (Parker)  Nebergall.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  boys: 
James,  deceased;  John,  the  subject  of  this  review;  Adam,  of  Carroll 
County,  Mo. ;  and  George  Franklin  of  St.  Louis.  The  father  was  descended 
from  a  long  line  of  Pennsylvania  ancestors.  He  was  a  farmer  there,  later 
he  went  to  Ohio  and  then  to  Illinois,  where  he  became  prosperous  as  a 
farmer.  Soon  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  he  came  to  Missouri,  locat- 
ing on  a  farm  in  Carroll  County,  Dec.  25,  1867.  He  became  one  of  the 
recognized  agriculturists  of  central.  Missouri  and  lived  there  until  he  re- 
tired, when  he  moved  to  Chillicothe,  and  died  in  1886  at  the  age  of  74 
years.  Mrs.  Nebergall  was  bom  near  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  and  died  1868, 
aged  55  years. 

John  H.  Nebergall  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  attended  the  district 
school.  When  only  18  years  old,  Mr.  Nebergall  secured  a  position  with  the 
construction  company  which  was  building  one  of  the  new  lines  of  railroad 
through  this  section.  He  was  willing  to  do  anything  to  make  a  start  and 
for  a  short  time  carried  water  and  did  anything  he  was  called  upon  to  do. 
With  headquarters  in  Moberly,  he  early  became  acquainted  with  this  city 
which  since  has  been  the  scene  of  his  financial  successes.  In  1873,  Mr. 
Nebergall  became  a  brakeman  on  the  Wabash  Railroad.  In  1875  he  was 
promoted  to  freight  conductor  and  in  1884  he  was  promoted  to  passenger 
conductor  and  today  holds  one  of  the  important  passenger  runs  on  the 


JOHN    H.    NRBEROAr.I 


HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY  241 

Wabash  system  from  Moberly  to  Des  Moines.  Not  confining  all  his 
energies  to  one  vocation,  Mr.  Nebergall  studied  the  financial  situation  and 
in  1890  invested  in  a  laundry  business  in  Moberly  in  association  with  R.  J . 
Gee.  This  partnership  was  dissolved  in  August,  1918  and  Mr.  Nebergall 
in  association  with  R.  J.  Gee  incorporated  the  laundry  with  a  capital  stock 
of  $40,000.  The  business  ran  the  first  week  about  $55.  Under  their  able 
management  this  has  been  increased  until  it  is  a  slack  season  when  the 
books  do  not  show  a  turn  over  of  more  than  $1,000  for  each  week  of  ihe 
year.  Today  the  Moberly  Steam  Laundry  has  one  of  the  largest  plants  in 
central  Missouri.  An  up-to-date  dry  cleaning  department  is  one  of  the 
features  of  the  business  and  gives  excellent  service. 

Mr.  Nebergall  operates  one  of  the  finest  cattle,  horse  and  stock 
ranches  in  Wallace  County,  Kan.,  which  is  incorporated  with  paid  up  capital 
of  $50,000.  In  addition  to  this  place,  Mr.  Nebergall  owns  two  sections  of 
valuable  wheat  and  grazing  land  in  Edwards  County,  Kan.,  where  he  raises 
grain  and  carries  on  extensive  dairying  operations.  He  is  also  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Durbin  Malleable  Foundry  Company,  of  St.  Louis,  which  is 
capitalized  at  $500,000  and  being  a  patriotic  citizen  Mr.  Nebergall  has  not 
neglected  the  home  industries  as  he  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Moberly  Trust 
Company.  He  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  substantial  financiers  of  central 
Missouri. 

On  Dec.  7,  1876,  Mr.  Nebergall  was  married  to  Miss  Nellie  Shumate, 
Jackson  County,  Ohio,  and  to  them  four  children  have  been  born:  Charles 
C,  in  partnership  with  his  father  in  the  Gates  Half  Sole  Tires  and  a  bat- 
tery service  station,  Moberly;  Jeanette,  married  W.  G.  Price,  of  Des 
Moines;  Bessie,  who  married  J.  W.  F'aessler,  of  Moberly,  and  Lewis  L.,  a 
bookkeeper  in  Omaha. 

Mr.  Nebergall  belongs  to  the  Masonic  Lodge  and  the  Order  of  Railroad 
Conductors.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church,  and  he 
is  a  Republican. 

James  Francis  Ratcliff  Wight. — Among  the  notable  Randolph  County 
families  none  has  been  more  conspicuous  for  three  generations  in  this 
county  since  1840  than  the  Wight  fam.ily. 

James  Francis  Ratcliff  Wight,  the  founder  of  the  Wight  family  in 
Randolph  County  was  born  in  PYankfort,  Ky.,  May  26,  1819  and  died 
Oct.  26,  1905.  He  was  a  son  of  James  and  Sarah  (Ratcliff)  Wight. 
James  Wight  was  the  founder  of  the  Wight  family  in  America.  He  was 
bom  at  Ormiston,  near  Edinburgh,  Scotland,  Feb.  24,  1789.    In  1794  he 


242  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

came  to  America  with  his  parents,  James  and  Jane  (McConachee)  Wight 
and  settled  near  Richmond,  Va.  He  subsequently  removed  to  Fleming 
County,  Ky.,  and  then  to  Frankfort,  in  the  same  state,  where  he  was 
married  Nov.  15,  1815,  to  Sarah  Ratcliff  and  to  them  were  born  eight 
children.  While  residing  in  Frankfort,  James  Wight  was  a  cabinet  work- 
man and  contractor  and  built  the  statehouse  or  capital.  In  1836  he  took 
his  family  to  Shelby  County,  Ky.,  and  ever  after  lived  as  a  farmer  until 
his  death  at  the  home  of  one  of  his  daughters  at  Normal,  111.,  April  22, 
1871.  He  was  a  soldier  in  the  War  of  1812.  His  early  education  was 
obtained  in  the  common  school  of  the  country  districts.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Methodist  Church  South  and  took  much  interest  in  church 
affairs,  giving  liberally  of  his  means  to  the  support  of  the  church  and 
benevolences. 

Sarah  (Ratcliff)  Wight,  wife  of  James  Wight,  was  born  in  Richmond, 
Va.,  May  10,  1790.  She  was  the  daughter  of  Francis  Ratcliff,  who  was 
born  in  Chesterfield  County,  Va.,  in  1755,  and  the  maiden  name  3f  her 
mother  was  Rebecca  Bridges  who  was  born  in  1758.  Frances  Ratcliff 
was  a  corporal  in  Capt.  William  Pierce's  company  in  the  Mrst  Artillery 
Regiment  of  Continental  troops,  commanded  by  Col.  Charles  Harrison 
during  the  Revolutionary  War.  This  regiment  was  assigned  to  the  state 
of  Virginia.  The  records  of  the  land  office  at  Richmond,  Va.,  show  that 
Francis  Ratcliff  was  allowed  the  portion  of  land  allotted  the  corporal  of 
the  Continental  line  for  three  years  service.  Sarah  Ratcliff  received  her 
education  in  the  common  schools  and  was  also  a  member  of  the  Methodist 
Church,  South. 

James  Francis  Ratcliff  Wight  married  Anna  Burton  in  Oldham 
County,  Ky.,  June  6,  1839.  She  died  Sept.  3,  1843,  leaving  one  child, 
James  William  Wight  who  now  resides  in  Moberly  and  a  sketch  of  whom 
appears  in  this  volume.  The  second  marriage  of  James  Francis  Ra'xliff 
Wight  was  to  Harriet  Amanda  Head,  Dec.  8,  1846.  No  children  v;ere 
born  to  this  marriage.  Mr.  Wight  was  a  farmer  and  stock  raiser  taking 
much  interest  in  fine  horses  and  cattle  and  he  was  a  promoter  of  agri- 
cultural fairs.  He  owned  about  1,000  acres  of  land  in  Randolph  County 
upon  which  he  resided  for  more  than  60  years  and  to  which  he  had  moved 
from  Shelby  County,  Ky.,  in  the  fall  of  1840.  He  was  a  Methodist  and 
in  politics  a  Whig,  and  as  a  member  of  that  party  he  was  elected  to  the 
state  legislature  from  Randolph  County,  which  was  then  about  equally 
divided  between  Whigs  and  Democrats,  in  1854.    After  the  dissolution 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  243 

of  the  Whig  party,  he  allied  himself  with  the  Democrats  and  again  repre- 
sented Randolph  County  in  the  legislature  in  1876,  defeating  after  a 
spirited  contest  one  of  the  most  popular  men  of  the  county.  During  the 
Civil  War  he  was  a  strong  Southern  sympathizer,  and  while  he  did  not 
enlist  as  a  soldier  he  rendered  the  cause  much  help  by  his  counsel  and 
means.  During  that  great  conflict  he  had  many  interesting  experiences 
which  tested  the  true  metal  of  the  man.  While  he  was  steadfast^  and 
loyal  to  the  cause  in  which  he  believed  and  the  principles  for  which  he 
stood  he  was  also  fair  and  generous  to  its  enemies.  It  has  been  well  said 
of  him:  "The  late  Mr.  Wight  was  a  man  of  strict  integrity,  a  close 
observer  of  men  and  affairs,  a  good  judge  of  human  nature,  wise  in 
council,  and  his  advice  was  often  sought  in  matters  financial  and  judicial. 
He  was  very  charitable,  having  reared  six  orphan  children." 

Frances  Ann  (Burton)  Wight,  wife  of  James  Frances  Ratcliff  Wight, 
was  born  in  Oldham  County,  Ky.,  Jan.  21,  1820  and  was  the  daughter  of 
William  and  Ann  Burton.  She  came  with  her  widowed  mother  and  hus- 
band to  Randolph  County,  in  1840.  They  made  the  trip  in  wagons,  the 
party  consisting  of  eight  white  people  and  30  negro  slaves.  In  coming 
through  Illinois,  a  negro  girl  was  kidnapped  by  Abolitionists  which  de- 
tained them  several  days.  The  mother  of  the  kidnapped  girl  was  frantic 
with  grief  because  of  the  kidnapping  and  wild  with  joy  at  the  rescue. 

Forrest  Martin,  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Little  Dick  Clothing 
Company  of  Moberly,  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County  and  a  descendant 
of  one  of  the  very  early  pioneer  families  of  this  county.  He  was  born  in 
Prairie  township  May  8,  1877  and  is  the  son  of  Bailey  Martin  and  Martha 
Ellen  (Davis)  Martin.  Bailey  Martin  was  born  in  Prairie  township, 
Randolph  County,  Aug.  8,  1827.  He  was  reared  to  manhood  in  this 
county  and  followed  farming  and  stock  raising  here  all  his  life,  and  had  a 
successful  career.  He  died  Dec.  24,  1908  and  his  remains  are  buried  in 
the  Davis  Cemetery.  He  was  the  son  of  Hetiry  Martin,  a  native  of  Ken- 
tucky who  was  a  pioneer  settler  of  Prairie  township,  when  that  town- 
ship included  what  is  now  Sugar  Creek,  Silver  Creek  and  Salt  Spring 
township.  When  he  came  here  he  entered  government  land,  taking  up 
about  a  section  and  this  property  is  now  owned  by  the  Bailey  Martin 
heirs.  Henry  Martin  spent  his  entire  life  in  Randolph  County,  after 
coming  here  and  died  about  the  age  of  84  years.  He  was  prominent  in 
the  early  day  affairs  of  this  county  and  served  as  justice  of  the  peace 
of  Prairie  township  for  a  number  of  years. 


244  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Bailey  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  in  Prairie  township,  Feb.  18, 
1852  with  Miss  Martha  Ellen  Davis.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Joseph  and 
Permelia  (Kirkpatrick)  Davis  who  were  also  very  early  pioneer  settlers 
in  Prairie  township.  They  were  Kentuckians  and  drove  through  from 
that  state  to  Randolph  County  on  horseback.  They  both  spent  their  lives 
in  this  county  and  their  remains  are  buried  in  Davis  Cemetery.  Mrs. 
Martha  Ellen  (Davis)  Martin  is  now  82  years  of  age  and  resides  on  the 
home  place  in  Prairie  township. 

To  Bailey  and  Martha  Ellen  (Davis)  Martin  were  born  13  children, 
all  of  whom  are  living  as  follow:  Mollie,  married  Lee  Shirley,  now  de- 
ceased and  she  resides  in  Colorado;  Ida,  married  T.  S.  Hines  who  is  now 
deceased  and  she  resides  in  Texas;  Ella,  widow  of  the  late  T.  T.  Patton, 
Moberly;  Laura,  married  Noah  Burkhead  and  lives  in  Prairie  township; 
Prof.  W.  H.  Kansas  City,  Mo.;  J.  R.,  president  of  the  Little  Dick  Cloth- 
ing Company,  Moberly;  Hannah,  married  J.  J.  Ct^ristian,  Moberly;  Mattie, 
resides  at  home  with  her  mother;  J.  D.,  with  the  Little  Dick  Clothing 
Company;  Luther,  agent  for  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  at  DeWitt, 
Mo.;  Florence  resides  at  home  with  her  mother;  Omar,  manager  of  the 
Wolff -Berger  Company,  Moberly  and  Forrest,  the  subject  of  Lhis  sketch. 

Forrest  Martin  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  and  received  his  edu- 
cation in  the  public  schools.  He  began  his  career  as  a  clerk  in  Moberly 
and  in  1907  he  was  elected  county  clerk  of  Randolph  County  and  served 
in  that  capacity  in  a  capable  and  efficient  mariner  until  1911  when  he 
bought  a  half  interest  in  the  Little  Di(^  Clothing  Company  which  nad 
been  established  by  his  brother  J.  R.,  in  1897  and  since  that  time  he  has 
devoted  himself  to  this  business. 

Mr.  Martin  was  married  July  1,  1900  to  Miss  Sallie  G.  Perkins,  of 
Moberly,  Mo.,  the  marriage  ceremony  being  performed  at  the  home  of 
the  bride's  grandmother,  Mrs.  Sallie  Peeler  at  Rocheport,  Mo.  Mrs.  Mar- 
tin is  a  daughter  of  Rev.  G^  A.  Perkins,  a  minister  of  the  Christian  denom- 
ination. To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin  have  been  bom  two  children:  Martha 
Maurine  a  student  in  Linwood  College,  and  Doris  Margaret,  at  home  with 
her  parents. 

Mr.  Martin  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose  and  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  He 
is  a  substantial  citizen  and  one  of  Moberly's  most  progressive  business 
men. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  245 

Phares  K.  Weis,  who  is  successfully  engaged  in  the  general  insurance 
business  at  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  younger 
business  men  of  this  city.  He  is  a  native  of  Kentucky,  bom  at  Louisa, 
Lawrence  County,  Ky.,  Jan.  7,  1885.  He  is  the  son  of  Dr.  Francis  W. 
and  Josephine  (Evans)  Weis.  The  father  was  born  in  Maysville,  Ky., 
in  1852,  and  the  mother  is  a  native  of  Missouri,  born  at  Armstrong, 
Howard  County  in  1861.  His  parents  were  among  the  early  settlers  of 
that  section  of  the  state. 

PKares  K.  Weis  and  his  brothers  LeRoy  D.  who  now  resides  at  Chi- 
cago, 111.  and  Rolla  L.  who  died  in  infancy,  were  the  only  children  born 
to  their  parents.  Phares  K.  Weis  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of 
Kentucky,  West  Virginia  and  Moberly.  In  early  life  he  began  the 
printer's  trade  on  the  Ashland  Daily  News,  Ashland,  Ky.  Later  he 
worked  on  the  Armstrong  Herald,  Armstrong,  Mo.,  and  in  1896  he  came  to 
Moberly,  and  was  employed  on  the  Weekly  Headlight  for  two  years.  He 
then  entered  the  employ  of  the  Moberly  Democrat  and  remained  with  that 
paper  for  eight  years  and  at  the  time  of  his  resignation  he  was  city 
editor.  He  then  worked  on  the  Monitor  for  four  years.  He  was  a 
charter  member  of  the  Moberly  Printer's  Union  when  he  was  sixteen 
years  old. 

Mr.  Weis  began  writing  insurance  in  1911  and  since  that  time  has 
gradually  added  some  of  the  best  companies  to  his  agency,  until  he  now 
represents  a  number  of  the  best  insurance  companies  of  the  country. 
He  represents  practically  every  branch  of  insurance  underwriting  and 
has  built  up  an  extensive  business.  His  offices  are  located  in  the  Moberly 
Trust  Building. 

Mr.  Weis  was  married  in  1912  to  Miss  Harriet  Turley  of  Moberly,. 
Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Marie  Turley.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Weis  have  been  bom  two  children:  Mary  Loraine  and  Phares  K.,  Jr. 

Mr.  Weis  takes  an  active  part  in  all  matters  pertaining  to  the  better- 
ment and  upbuilding  of  the  community  and  for  a  time  during  the  year 
.of  1919,  he  was  acting  secretary  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  an  organ- 
ization in  which  he  has  taken  a  keen  interest. 

I.  B.  Forney,  proprietor  of  the  I.  B.  Forney  Ladies  Ready  to  Wear 
Clothing  Store  is  one  of  the  successful  merchants  of  Moberly  and  con- 
ducts one  of  the  leading  establishments  of  this  section,  dealing  exclu- 
sively in  ladies'  ready  to  wear  garments.  Mr.  Forney  has  been  engaged 
in  the  mercantile  business  in  Moberly  for  over  40  years,  and  during  that 


246  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

time  has  built  up  a  reputation  which  extends  over  a  large  scope  of  terri- 
tory and  the  name,  Forney,  means  the'last  word  in  style  and  quahty. 

I.  B.  Forney  was  born  at  West  Liberty,  Ohio  County,  Va.,  March  14, 
1861.  He  is  a  son  of  D.  S.  Forney  and  Henrietta  (Beatty)  Forney.  The 
mother  was  born  in  Cambridge,  Ohio,  in  1836  and  died  in  Moberly,  Mo., 
in  1872.  D.  S.  Forney  was  a  native  of  Virginia,  bom  in  1834.  He  came 
to  Moberly  in  1867 ;  prior  to  that  time  he  was  a  wool  buyer  in  this  section. 
Here  he  engaged  in  the  dry  goods  business  which  he  conducted  for  a 
number  of  years.  He  was  one  of  the  successfi^l  pioneer  merchants  of 
Moberly  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  in  1912,  he  was  the  oldest  merchant 
in  this  city.  He  lived  to  the  age  of  78  years  and  his  remains  rest  by  the 
side  of  his  wife  in  Oakland  Cemetery. 

D.  S.  Forney  was  a  son  of  Dr.  D.  S.  Forney,  Sr.,  who  was  bom  in 
Eeistertown,  Maryland,  and  died  in  Burlington,  la.  He  was  a  highly 
educated  man  and  a  graduate  of  Yale,  having  received  his  degree  when 
he  was  21  years  of  age.  He  practiced  medicine  for  70  years.  His  first 
wife  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Buchanan  and  she  was  a  niece  of  President 
James  Buchanan.  Their  marriage  ceremony  was  performed  by  Rev. 
Alexander  Campbell,  founder  of  the  Christian  church. 

D.  S.  Forney,  father  of  I.  B.  Forney,  was  not  only  a  successful 
merchant,  but  took  an  active  part  in  the  civic  affairs  of  Moberly.  He 
served  three  terms  as  mayor  of  this  city  and  during  that  period  much 
public  improvement  was  made,  including  a  sewer  system  and  water 
works,  as  well  as  other  improvements. 

'  I.  B.  Forney  is  one  of  the  following  children  bom  to  his  parents: 
May  Miller,  deceased;  I.  B.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Mrs.  Etta  Ditty, 
deceased;  and  Frank  B.  a  merchant  of  Moberly. 

I.  B.  Forney  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Moberly  and  was 
brought  up  in  the  mercantile  business.  He  engaged  in  the  dry  goods 
business  for  himself  at  Moberly  in  1894,  at  his  present  location.  Here 
he  continued  in  the  general  drygoods  business  until  about  1913,  when 
he  began  to  specialize  in  ladies'  ready  to  wear  clothing  and  abandoned  the 
general  drygoods  business  and  has  buit  up  an  extensive  business  in  this 
particular  line.  He  is  a  discriminating  buyer  and  makes  regular  trips 
to  the  eastern  markets  and  manufacturers  to  purchase  his  stock  and  study 
the  styles  and  the  I.  B.  Forney  store  can  always  be  depended  upon  to 
stand  in  the  forefront  in  style  as  well  as  quality. 


HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  247 

The  store  is  located  at  400  Reed  Street  and  is  equipped  with  the  most 
modem  fixtures.  Mr.  Forney  is  the  owner  of  the  building,  the  first  floor 
of  which  is  occupied  by  his  business  and  the  upper  floors  is  rented  for 
office  purposes. 

Mr.  Forney  was  united  in  marriage  Jan.  1,  1895  with  Miss  Ida  Trede- 
man  of  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  and  two  daughters  have  been  born  to  this  union: 
Henrietta  and  Irene,  both  graduates  of  the  Moberly  High  School. 

Mr.  Forney  is  a  progressive  business  man  and  stands  high  in  the 
community. 

Dr.  Thomas  S.  Fleming,  a  well  known  and  successful  physician  of 
Moberly,  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County.  He  was  born  at  Elliott,  May  30, 
1887,  and  is  a  son  of  Jacob  C.  and  Nettie  (McClure)  Fleming,  further 
mention  of  whom  is  made  in  this  volume. 

Dr.  Fleming  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Moberly,  and  was  graduated  from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  the  class 
of  1907.  .  He  then  entered  Missouri  University  at  Columbia,  Mo.,  where 
he  was  graduated  in  1911 ;  he  then  attended  St.  Louis  Medical  University, 
and  was  graduated  with  a  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  in  1913.  After 
serving  two  yeal*s  as  an  intern  in  the  city  hospital  at  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  he 
began  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Moberly,  Jan.  1,  1915.  Here  he 
was  successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  until  the  United 
States  entered  the  World  War,  when  on  June  2,  1917,  he  applied  for  a 
commission  in  the  medical  corps  of  the  United  States  army,  and  was  com- 
missioned as  first  lieutenant,  and  sent  to  Fort  Riley,  Kan.,  where  he  was 
stationed  until  Jan.  1,  1918.  He  was  then  attached  to  the  65th  Coast  Ar- 
tillery at  San  Francisco,  Calif.  In  March,  1918,  he  set  sail  from  San 
Francisco  with  his  unit  for  France,  by  way  of  the  Panama  Canal,  and 
arrived  there  with  the  65th  Coast  Artillery,  April  8,  1918.  From  that  time 
on  he  was  with  his  command  at  the  front,  until  the  armistice  was  signed. 
He  returned  to  the  United  States  in  Jan.,  1919,  and  shortly  afterwards 
resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Moberly,  where  he  has  an  exten- 
sive and  well  established  practice. 

Dr.  Fleming  was  united  in  marriage  Oct.  3,  1917,  with  Eilleen  Trenble, 
daughter  of  M.  J.  and  Ahna  (Valendegham)  Trenble,  of  Plattsburg,  Mo. 
To  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Fleming  have  been  bom  one  daughter,  Shirley,  who 
was  bom  June  27,^1919. 

Dr.  Fleming  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
and  holds  membership  in  the  County,  State  and  American  Medical  Asso- 
ciation. 


248  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

James  Sandison,  a  pioneer  of  Moberly  who  for  many  years  was  en- 
gaged in  contracting,  is  now  living  retired  at  his  comfortable  and  pleasant 
home  at  902  West  Gilman  street,  Moberly,  Mo.  Mr.  Sandison  was  born  at 
New  Mills  of  Keith,  Scotland,  Dec.  29,  1843.  He  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Jean  (Dasson)  Sandison,  both  natives  of  Scotland,  the  former  being  born 
near  the  New  Mills  of  Keith  and  the  latter  on  the  Eiver  Donn.  The  father 
was  a  stone  mason.  The  mother  came  to  America  when  she  was  52  years 
of  age  and  settled  near  Huntsville,  Mo.  She  spent  the  remainder  of  her 
life  in  Randolph  County  and  died  at  the  age  of  92  years  and  her  remains 
are  buried  at  Huntsville. 

The  following  children  were  born  to  William  and  Jean  (Dasson) 
Sandison:  William,  died  at  Huntsville,  Mo.;  Mrs.  Annie  Simpson,  Hunts- 
ville, Mo.;  James,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Arthur,  deceased;  Charles, 
deceased;  Mrs.  Mary  Murray,  Paducah,  Ky. ;  Christena  Bohn,  Huntsville; 
Jean,  deceased ;  and  two  of  the  family.  Jack  and  Helen,  remained  in  Scot- 
land. 

Since  coming  to  Randolph  County,  James  Sandison  has  seen  this  sec- 
tion of  the  country  developed  almost  from  the  beginning.  When  he  came 
to  Randolph  County  there  were  only  three  houses  on  the  present  site  of 
the  city  of  Moberly.  Since  early  manhood,  Mr.  Sandison  has  been  engaged 
in  construction  work  and  similar  industrial  enterprises  and  was  a  success- 
ful contractor  during  his  active  career.  He  began  constructing  railroad 
bridges  for  the  Hannibal,  Moberly  and  Central  Railroad  Company  which 
is  now  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas  Railroad.  His  last  contract  work 
was  for  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  at  St.  Louis  where  he  did  some 
bridge  work,  built  a  roundhouse  and  constructed  additional  trackage  to 
accommodate  the  World's  Fair  traffic.  For  several  years  Mr.  Sandison 
was  also  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  brick  at  Moberly  and  did  an  ex- 
tensive business  in  this  line  and  at  the  same  time  carried  on  his  general 
contracting  business.  He  frequently  employed  as  many  as  80  or  90  men 
and  kept  his  plant  in  operation  continually.  He  was  an  extensive  employer 
of  labor  and  never  had  any  trouble  with  his  employees.  He  sold  his  brick 
plant  in  1906  to  the  Metropolitan  Paving  and  Brick  Company  of  Canton, 
Ohio,  and  that  company  still  operates  it.     Mr.  Sandison  then  retired. 

In  1872,  Mr.  Sandison  returned  to  Scotland  and  was  married  to  Miss 
Mary  Morrison  and  brought  his  bride  to  Moberly.  Mrs.  ^andison's  mother, 
Margaret  Morrison,  now  resides  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sandison.  She  came 
to  Moberly  in  1881.     She  was  bom  in  Scotland  Dec.  24,  1827  and  although 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  249 

now  in  her  93rd  year  she  is  as  keen  and  active  as  the  average  person  many 
years  younger.  She  gets  up  every  morning  at  six  o'clock  and  during  the 
World  War  she  did  a  great  deal  of  knitting  for  the  Red  Cross.  She  has 
the  distinction  of  having  had  three  grandsons  in  the  World  War.  They 
were  John,  Herbert  and  George  Morrison,  all  of  whom  entered  the  army 
from  Arizona. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sandison  have  been  born  the  following  children: 
James  George,  William,  Jack,  George  and  Arthur. 

Mr.  Sandison  has  been  an  extensive  traveler  during  the  course  of  his 
career  and  has  made  13  trips  across  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  He  was  in  Scot- 
land when  the  World  War  broke  out.  He  crossed  the  ocean  four  times  on 
the  ill  fated  Lusitania  and  made  his  last  return  trip  on  the  Aquitania. 
For  the  last  few  years  he  and  Mrs.  Sandison  made  a  trip  north  each  sum- 
mer, including  Canada  and  Alaska.  He  is  a  Randolph  County  citizen  of 
real  worth  and  is  held  in  the  highest  esteem. 

Jack  M.  Sandison,  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Robuck-Sandison  Whole- 
sale Grocery  Company  of  Moberly,  is  a  well  known  and  progressive  busi- 
ness man  of  this  city.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County  and  was 
bom  in  Moberly  July  30,  1879.  He  is  the  son  of  James  and  Mary  (Mor- 
rison) Sandison,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume. 

Jack  M.  Sandison  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Moberly  and 
the  Ohio  State  University  at  Columbus,  Ohio.  After  completing  school 
he  learned  the  science  of  ^ceramics,  or  the  art  of  clay  working.  He  then 
was  engaged  with  his  father  in  the  manufacture  of  brick  at  Moberly  for 
a  number  of  years.  In  1915  he  engaged  in  the  wholesale  grocery  busi- 
ness in  partnership  with  Mr.  Robuck  and  since  that  time  has  been  success- 
fully engaged  in  that  business. 

Mr.  Sandison  is  a  Republican  and  takes  an  active  part  in  political 
affairs;  he  has  been  his  party's  candidate  for  state  representative  and 
county  assessor.  He  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  member  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine 

William  Sandison,  of  the  firm  of  Robuck-Sandison,  wholesale  grocers 
of  Moberly  was  born  at  Huntsville,  Mo.,  Dec.  6,  1874.  He  is  the  son  of 
James  Sandison,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume.  William 
Sandison  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Moberly,  including  a  course 
in  the  Moberly  High  School.  Later  he  took  a  course  in  business  college 
and  for  17  years  he  was  manager  and  superintendent  of  the  Moberly  Pav- 
ing Brick  Company.     He  continued  with  that  company  for  several  years 


250  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

after  the  local  plant  was  purchased  and  operated  by  the  Metropolitan  Pav- 
ing Brick  Company.  He  resigned  his  position  with  that  company  in  1916 
and  in  February,  1917,  he  became  associated  with  the  Robuck-Sandison 
Company. 

Mr.  Sandison  was  married  to  Miss  Olive  Chamblin  of  Paducah,  Ky. 
She  is  a  daughter  of  C.  H.  Chamblin  who  now  resides  at  Carthage,  Mo. 
and  whose  wife  is  deceased.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Byers.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs  Sandison  have  been  born  three  children  as  follow:  James  C, 
at  Harvard  University ;  AUie  Janette  and  Gordon. 

Mr.  Sandison  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons 
and  is  a  Knights  Templar. 

Jacob  C.  Fleming,  president  of  the  Moberly  Foundry  and  Machine 
Company,  is  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  Moberly,  and  is  at 
the  head  of  one  of  the  important  industrial  enterprises  of  this  city.  He. 
was  born  at  Kewanee,  111.,  April  27,  1860,  and  is  a  son  of  Thomas  and 
Janet  (Simpson)  Fleming,  the  former  a  native  of  England  and  the  latter 
of  Scotland.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Jennie, 
now  the  widow  of  R.  S.  Crammer,  and  resides  at  Nevada,  Mo. ;  Mary,  mar- 
ried Thomas  W.  Vandivier,  Nevada,  Mo.;  Jacob  C,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Ira  M.,  Kansas  City,  Mo.;  Cora  I.,  widow  of  E.  K.  Atkinson, 
Nevada,  Mo.;  Emma  L.,  married  A.  L.  Davis,  Joplin,  Mo.;  Elizabeth  A., 
married  David  Cravens,  Lincoln,  Neb. 

Thomas  Fleming  came  to  America  about  1854,  and  first  settled  at 
McKeesport,  Pa.,  where  he  was  engaged  in  coal  mining.  About  1858  he 
went  to  Kewanee,  111.,  where  he  was  living  when  the  Civil  War  broke  out. 
He  enlisted  in  1862  in  the  Union  Army  and  served  until  the  close  of  the 
war.  He  took  part  in  a  number  of  important  engagements  and  was  with 
Sherman  on  his  march  to  the  sea  and  participated  in  the  Grand  Review 
at  Washington  at  the  close  of  the  war.  After  receiving  his  honorable 
discharge  from  the  army,  he  returned  to  Kewanee,  where  he  operated 
coal  mines  for  a  few  years  and  in  1872  went  to  Fort  Dodge,  la.  He  was 
engaged  as  superintendent  of  mines  there  for  a  time  and  in  1876  he  went 
to  Chetopa,  Kan.  Here  he  continued  his  interest  in  the  coal  mining  busi- 
ness and  had  charge  of  coal  mines  in  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Indian  Terri- 
tory for  the  Osage  Coal  and  Mining  Company.  About  1879,  he  removed 
to  Clinton,  Mo.  continuing  with  the  same  company  and  later  went  to 
Nevada,  Mo.,  where  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  died  in  1895 
and  his  wife  departed  this  life  in  1916  and  their  remains  are  buried  at 
Nevada,  Mo. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  251 

Jacob  C.  Fleming  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Illinois,  Iowa 
and  Kansas,  and  when  he  was  17  years  of  age,  began  life  as  a  telegraph 
operator  in  the  employ  of  the  Missouri,  Kansas  and  Texas  Railway  Com- 
pany. In  1884,  he  took  charge  of  the  Osage  Coal  and  Mining  Company's 
store  at  Elliott,  Randolph  County,  Mo.  and  later  had  charge  of  the  opera- 
tion of  their  coal  mine  there.  In  1890,  his  father  bought  the  coal  mine 
property  there  and  Jacob  C.  had  charge  of  the  operation  until  1905,  when 
practically  all  of  the  coal  mines  of  Randolph  County,  were  absorbed  by 
the  Randolph-Macon  Coal  Company. 

In  1906,  Mr.  Fleming  came  to  Moberly  when  he  and  the  other  heirs 
of  the  Thomas  Fleming  estate  organized  the  Moberly  Foundry  and  Ma- 
chine Company.  This  company  continued  to  do  business  as  a  partner- 
ship until  1915,  when  it  was  incorporated  with  a  capital  stock  of  $21,000. 
In '1917,  the  Thomas  Fleming  estate  was  settled  and  Jacob  C.  Fleming 
continued  the  business.  This  company  has  been  successfully  operated 
from  the  start  and  does  an  extensive  business,  their  principal  product 
being  railway  castings  and  their  entire  product,  practically,  is  bought  by 
the  Wabash  Railway  Company.  They  do  a  general  machine  shop  business 
in  addition  to  manufacturing  heavy  castings;  they  also  manufacture  coal 
mine  equipment  and  machinery,  and  employe  about  18  men.  The  shop 
is  located  at  the  comer  of  East  Reed  and  Moulton  streets. 

Jacob  C.  Fleming  was  married  in  1886  to  Miss  Nettie  McClure  of 
Clinton,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  William  J.  and  Narcissa  (Fike)  Mc- 
Clure, the  former  of  whom  is  deceased,  and  Mrs.  McClure  makes  her  home 
with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Fleming.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fleming  have  been 
born  the  following  children:  Dr.  Thomas  S.,  Moberly,  a  sketch  of  whom 
appears  in  this  volume;  Jacob  William,  who  is  associated  with  his  father; 
Janet  Elliott  Fleming,  in  the  employ  of  the  Government  at  Washington, 
D.  C. 

Mr.  Fleming  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  Templar  Commandery  of 
Moberly.  He  has  an  extensive  acquaintance  in  Moberly  and  Randolph 
County  and  is  one. of  the  enterprising  and  substantial  citizens  of  this 
section. 

E.  Bell  Mahan,  of  the  well  known  firm  of  Mahan  and  Son,  funeral 
directors  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  a  native  of  this  state  and  belongs  to  one  of 
the  early  pioneer  families.  He  was  bom  in  Audrain  County,  about  15 
miles  southeast  of  Moberly,  March  23,  1864,  and  is  a  son  of  John  T.  and 
Elizabeth  (Owings)  Mahan.     John  T.  Mahan  was  bom  in  Boone  County, 


252  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Mo.,  Feb.  2,  1828  and  died  near  Paris,  Mo.,  Aug.  8,  1914,  and  his  remains 
are  buried  at  Moberly.  He  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  having  served 
in  the  Union  Army.  His  wife  was  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  preceded 
her  husband  in  death  several  years.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  fol- 
lowing children:  Mrs.  Levina  Crosswhite  Monroe  County,  Mo.;  B.  D., 
a  contractor,  Annaconda,  Mont.;  James  A.,  died  at  Ft.  Worth,  Texas, 
about  1914,  at  the  age  of  58  years ;  Walter,  Anaconda,  Mont. ;  Charles  F., 
a  farmer  near  Paris,  Mo.;  E.  Bell,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Samuel  L., 
Anaconda,  Mont.;  Mrs.  Emma  Hobson,  Kansas  City,  Mo.;  Florence,  died 
in  infancy ;  Cyrus,  died  in  1890,  age  16  years. 

E.  Bell  Mahan  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  engaged  in 
business  at  his  present  location  in  Moberly,  Sept.  16,  1892.  This  firm  was 
also  engaged  in  furniture  business  until  Sept.  1,  1918  and  since  that  time 
they  have  been  devoted  exclusively  to  the  undertaking  business  and  are 
recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  firms  of  funeral  directors  in  this  section 
of  the  state.  The  firm  was  originally.  Van  Cleave,  Martin  and  Mahan 
and  on  Jan.  1,  1910,  Mr.  Vancleave  sold  his  interest  to  the  other  partners 
and  since  April  1,  1920,  the  business  has  been  conducted  by  Mr.  Mahan 
and  Son  at  211  North  Clark  street. 

Mr.  Mahan  was  married  March  18,  1890,  to  Miss  Francis  King,  a 
daughter  of  Francis  and  Mary  (Bunger)  King,  both  natives  of  Kentucky 
and  now  deceased.  The  father  was  killed  shortly  after  the  close  of  the 
Civil  War  and  the  mother  died  in  '1895  and  their  remains  are  buried 
in  Meade,  Kentucky. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mahan  have  been  born  the  following  children: 
Verna,  married  H.  H.  Stampes,  Moberly,  Missouri;  Albert,  a  sketch  of 
whom  follows  this  article;  Eugenia,  resides  at  home  with  her  parents, 
at  527  Logan  Terrace. 

Mr.  Mahan  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks;  Knights  of  Pythias;  National  Union;  Knights  and  Ladies  of  Se- 
curity and  the  Mystic  Workers  of  the  World.  Mr.  Mahan  is  progressive 
and  public  spirited  and  takes  a  commendable  interest  in  public  affairs;  he 
has  served  as  a  member  of  the  Moberly  City  Council. 

Albert  K.  Mahan  of  Moberly,  who  is  associated  with  his  father,  was 
bom  in  Moberly,  July  11,  1894,  and  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  public 
school  of  this  city  and  graduated  from  the  Moberly  high  school  in  the 
class  of  1913.  After  leaving  school  he  was  employed  by  the  firm  of  Mar- 
tin and  Mahan  until  after  the  United  States  entered  the  World  War.    On 


HISTOKY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  253 

May  25,  1918,  he  enlisted  in  the  United  States  army  and  was  sent  to 
Camp  Dodge,  Iowa.  Later  he  was  transferred  to  Camp  Upton,  New  York, 
and  in  Aug.,  1918,  he  embarked  for  overseas,  a  member  of  Company  M, 
349th  United  States  Infantry,  and  first  landed  on  tY^e  other  side  at  South- 
ampton, England,  and  from  there  sailed  to  LeHarve,  France,  and  after  a 
period  of  training  was  sent  to  sector  Hute,  Alsace,  France,  Oct.  17th,  and 
when  the  armistice  was  signed  he  was  with  his  command  about  twenty 
miles  from  Metz.  After  the  signing  of  the  armistice,  he  remained  in 
France  for  .several  months  and  reached  the  United  States  on  May  30, 
1919.  He  was  then  sent  to  Camp  Zacharay  Taylor,  Ky.,  where  he  received 
his  honorable  discharge  June  12,  1919.  He  then  returned  to  Moberly 
and  resumed  his  former  position  and  became  a  partner  with  his  father. 

Albert  Mahan  is  a  member  of  the  American  Legion  and  is  adjutant 
of  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  No.  6,  Moberly,  Mo.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

John  E.  Lynch,  president  of  the  Bank  of  Moberly,  and  United  States 
marshal  for  the  Eastern  District  of  Missouri,  has  had  an  unusual  and 
successful  career.  Mr.  Lynch  was  born  in  Randolph  County,  just  north 
of  Huntsville,  Jan.  11,  1858,  and  is  a  son  of  Patrick  and  Amanda  (Stevens) 
Lynch. 

Patrick  Lynch  was  a  native  of  County  Carlow,  Ireland,  and  was 
born  in  1818.  He  came  to  America  in  1848,  and  the  same  year  settled 
in  Randolph  County,  near  Roanoke,  and  a  few  years  later,  he  removed 
to  a  farm  north  of  Huntsville.  Here  he  resided  until  1860,  when  he 
came  to  the  vicinity  of  what  is  now  the  city  of  Moberly,  and  during 
the  Civil  War  he  cultivated  a  portion  of  the  present  site  of  Moberly, 
and  lived  at  what  was  known  as  old  Allen,  and  after  the  war  when 
the  railroad  was  being  built  the  railroad  company  offered  Mr.  Lynch 
and  others  an  amount  of  land  in  Moberly  equal  to  that  which  they  owned 
at  old  Allen.  Mr.  Lynch  was  the  first  to  accept  the  proposition  and 
moved  his  residence  to  Moberly.  The  original  town  site  of  Moberly  con- 
sisted of  40  acres  of  land,  and  was  bounded  on  the  east  by  Morley 
street,  on  the  south  by  Wightman  street,  on  the  west  by  the  alley  be- 
tween Clark  and  Williams  street,  and  on  the  north  by  Union  avenue. 
Mr.  Lynch's  house  was  located  on  block  No.  12,  and  his  bam  was 
located  on  block  No.  7,  where  the  Merchants  Hotel  now  stands.  After 
the  Wabaash  shops  were  built,  Patrick  Lynch  was  employed  by 
that  company,  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  Moberly.    He  died 


254  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

in  1883.  Amanda  (Stevens)  Lynch,  wife  of  Patrick  Lynch  was  a  na- 
tive of  Virginia.  She  died  at  the  age  of  68  years,  and  her  remains  and 
those  of  her  husband  are  buried  in  St.  Johns  cemetery. 

The  children  born  to  Patrick  Lynch  and  wife  are  as  follow:  Thomas 
Allen,  was  an  engineer  on  the  Southern  Pacific  Railroad,  and  was  killed 
in  a  wreck  at  Centralia,  Wash.;  Richard  Moberly,  died  in  infancy;  John 
E.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  James  C,  Omaha,  Neb. 

John  E.  Lynch  bears  the  distinction  of  being  the  oldest  living  resi- 
dent of  the  city  of  Moberly  from  the  standpoint  of  continuous  residence 
here.  He  came  here  with  his  parents  when  a  child,  and  here  grew 
to  manhood,  and  since  that  time  he  has  been  closely  identified  with 
the  growth  and  development  of  this  city  in  many  ways.  He  received 
his  education  in  such  public  schools  as  the  town  afforded  in  the  early 
days  of  its  existence.  When  a  boy  his  first  work  was  driving  team  at 
the  constraction  of  the  Wabash  shops  here.  He  received  $5.00  per  week 
for  his  labor.  After  that,  he  worked  in  the  shops  for  three  years,  and 
then  was  a  fireman  for  three  years.  In  1880,  he  was  elected  chief 
of  police  of  Moberly  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  three  years.  This 
was  an  early  day  in  the  history  of  Moberly,  and  like  other  new  towns 
of  that  epoch,  the  limited  police  force  found  itself  confronted  frequentl}'' 
by  duties  that  were  difficult  to  perform.  Mr.  Lynch  met  all  these  con- 
ditions and  by  his  courage  and  capabilities  always  succeeded  in  main- 
taining law  and  order.  After  having  served  three  years  as  chief  of 
police,  he  was  engaged  by  the  city  to  run  the  city  fire  engine  for  two 
years,  when  he  was  re-elected  to  the  office  of  chief  of  police  and  held 
this  position  until  1894.  He  was  then  appointed  United  States  marshal 
for  the  Eastern  District  of  Missouri  by  President  Cleveland,  and  capa- 
bly discharged  the  duties  of  that  office  for  a  period  of  four  years.  At 
the  expiration  of  that  time  Mr.  Lynch  began  operating  as  a  construc- 
tion contractor,  arid  specialized  in  paving  and  sewer  construction,  and 
was  successfully  engaged  in  this  line  of  work  until  Aug.  15,  1914,  when 
he  was  appointed  United  States  marshal  for  the  Eastern  District  of 
Missouri  by  President  Wilson,  and  at  the  expiration  of  his  four  years' 
term  in  that  office,  he  was  reappointed  and  holds  that  position  at  the 
present  time. 

Mr.  Lynch  was  elected  president  of  the  Bank  of  Moberly  in  Febru- 
ary, 1916,  and  since  that  time  has  held  that  position,  and  in  the  capacity 
of  chief  executive  officer  of  this  well  known  and  substantial  financial 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  255 

institution,  Mr.'  Lynch  has  evinced  the  same  keen  foresight  and  clear 
judgment  that  has  characterized  his  successful  career  in  other  fields 
of  endeavor. 

My  Lynch  was  united  in  marriage  in  1882  with  Miss  Mary  A.  Hall 
of  Truesdale,  Warren  County,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Denny  and 
Elizabeth  Hall  of  that  county.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lynch  have  been  born 
the  following  children:  George,  chief  deputy  United  States  marshal, 
St.  Louis,  Mo.;  John  E.,  Jr.,  of  the  Lynch-McDonald  Construction  Com- 
pany, of  Moberly;  Nellie,  Grace,  Frank,  Lucille  and  James  Robert.  The 
latter  served  in  the  United  States  navy  during  the  World  War. 

Mr.  Lynch  is  a  Democrat  and  for  years  has  been  active  in  the  coun- 
cils of  his  party  in  Randolph  County  and  Missouri.  He  has  served  two 
terms  as  a  member  of  the  state  legislature.  He  was  a  delegate  to  Demo- 
cratic National  Convention  at  Baltimore,  which  nominated  Woodrow  Wil- 
son for  president,  and.  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  Democrats 
of  the  state.  He  has  an  extensive  acquaintance  and  many  friends,  not 
only  in  Randolph  County,  but  throughout  the  state  and  country. 

The  Bank  of  Moberly  is  one  of  the  strong  financial  institutions  of 

central  Missouri.     This  bank  was  organized  May  11,  1895,  by  John  H. 

'Babcock,  and  is  therefore  a  quarter  of  a  century  old,  and  has  to  its 

credit  25  years  of  successful  business,  and  each  yeaV  of  this  period  has 

shown  a  substantial  growth  in  the  volume  of  business  of  this  institution. 

The  first  stockholders  of  the  Bank  of  Moberly  were  George  Hassett, 
W.  T.  Richmond,  W.  P.  Palmer,  J.  T.  Lamb,  Gus  J.  Ginther,  W.  E.  Mc- 
Kinney,  G.  R.  Reynolds,  A.  B.  Thompson,  William  Firth,  W.  P.  Cave, 
B.  F.  Harvey,  D.  S.  Forney,  J.  H.  Babcock,  P.  J.  O'Leary,  H.  M.  Jordan, 
J.  H.  Lotter  and  F.  B.  Forney. 

The  present  officers  are  John  E.  Lynch,  president;  J.  H.  Lamb,  vice- 
president;  F.  B.  Harvey,  cashier;  P.  J.  O'Leary,  teller,  and  A.  E.  Brown, 
teller,  and  R.  E.  Lynch,  teller.  The  other  members  of  the  board  of 
directors  are  Dr.  C.  B.  Clapp,  George  H.  Sours,  Gus  J.  Ginther  and  George 
Reynolds. 

The  following  is  the  official  statement  of  the  bank  at  the  close  of 
business  December  30,  1919.  Resources:  Loans  and  discounts,  $801,- 
335.68;  overdrafts,  none;  real  estate  (banking  house),  $15,000.00;  fur- 
niture and  fixtures,  $15,000.00;  demand  loans,  $327,781.49;  bonds,  $85,- 
850.00;  War  Savings  Stamps,  $1,684.00;  cash  and  sight  exchange,- $255,- 
642.61;  total,  $1,502,293.78.     Liabilities:     Capital  stock,  $100,000.00;  sur- 


256  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

plus  and  undivided  profits  (earned),  $64,165.28;  deposits,  $1,338,128.50. 
Total,  $1,502,293.78. 

Owen  Redick  O'Bryian,  a  well  known  and  successful  attorney  of  Mob- 
erly  and  a  veteran  of  the  World  War,  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and 
a  member  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  this  section  of  Missouri.  Mr. 
O'Bryan  was  born  in  a  one  room  log  cabin,  three  miles  southwest  of  Hunts- 
ville.  Mo.,  on  the  old  O'Bryan  homestead  in  Salt  Spring  township.  He  is 
the  son  of  James  T.  and  Jennie  Lee  (Bagby)  O'Bryan. 

James  T.  O'Bryan  was  born  in  Chariton  County,  Mo.  in  1860  and  re- 
moved to  Randolph  County  with  his  parents  who  settled  in  Salt  Spring 
township  when  he"  was  three  years  old.  He  was  a  son  of  Redick  O'Bryan 
who  was  born  in  Kentucky  in  1820.  Redick  O'Bryan  was  prominent  in 
the  early  day  affairs  of  Randolph  County  and  served  as  justice  of  the 
peace  of  Salt  Spring  township  for  many  years.  He  was  a  deacon  in  the 
Mt.  Salem  Baptist  church.  He  died  Dec.  25,  1893  and  his  remains  are 
buried  in  the  O'Bryan  cemetery  which  is  located  on  the  old  O'Bryan  place. 

James  T.  O'Bryan  was  well  educated,  having  graduated  from  Mt. 
Pleasant  College' in  the  class  of  1881.  He  followed  farming  in  Silver  Creek 
township  from  1892  until  1902,  and  for  six  years  of  the  time  was  justice 
of  the  peace  of  that  township.     He  was  solicitor  for  the  Farmers  Mutual 

* 

Insurance  Company  and  after  moving  to  Huntsville  in  1902,  devoted  him- 
self to  the  interest  of  that  company.  In  1906,  he  was  a  candidate  for 
nomination  for  the  office  of  probate  judge  of  Randolph  County  but  was 
defeated  by  the  narrow  margin  of  28  votes.  Ke  stood  high  in  the  com- 
munity  and  had  a  wide  acquaintance  in  Randolph  County.  He  died  Nov. 
15,  1907,  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  the  Huntsville  cemetery.  James 
T.  O'Bryan  was  married  to  Jennie  Lee  Bagby,  Dec.  29,  1887.  She  wa« 
born  in  Moniteau  township,  Randolph  County,  above  five  miles  northwest 
of  Higbee,  and  was  a  daughter  of  Owen  H.  and  Maria  (Yager)  Bagby  who 
were  pioneer  settlers  of  Silver  Creek  township.  Jennie  Lee  (Bagby) 
O'Bryan  was  one  of  ten  children  born  to  her  parents,  the  others  being  as 
follow:  Thomas  J.,  WiUiam  H.,  deceased;  Zebulon  P.,  Mrs.  Mary  Jackson, 
deceased ;  Mrs.  Korine  Shipp,  deceased ;  James  W.,  Warsaw,  Mo. ;  Benjamin 
F.  and  Walter  H.  The  Bagby  family  was  one  of  the  very  early  pioneer 
families  of  central  Missouri.  Owen  H.  Bagby  was  bom  in  Kentucky  and 
came  to  Missouri  with  his  parents  who  settled  near  Roanoke,  Silver  Creek 
township  in  1827.  He  was  a  son  of  John  Bagby.  Maria  (Yager)  Bagby, 
wife  of  Owen  H.  Bagby,  was  born  at  Hampton  Roads,  Va.  and  came  here 


OWEN   REDICK   O'BRYAN 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  257 

with  her  parents  at  an  early  day  and  settled  on  the  place  where  Thomas  J. 
Bagby  now  lives.  To  John  T.  O'Bryan  and  wife  were  born  the  following 
children:  Owen  Redick,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Mrs.  Mary  Lee  O'Con- 
ner,  Huntsville,  Mo.  and  Zebulon  D.,  known  as  "Jack"  of  Huntsville,  Mo. 

Redick  O'Bryan,  grandfather  of  Owen  Redick  O'Bryan,  of  this  review, 
was  three  times  married  and  to  his  first  marriage  were  born  the  follow- 
ing children:  Rev.  William  F.,  deceased;  Mrs.  Flora  Bradley,  Yates,  Mo., 
and  Mrs.  Adaline  Randecker,  of  Booneville,  Mo.  After  the  death  of  his 
first  wife,  he  married  Mary  Dennis  who  was  the  seventh  of  19  children 
of  Harrison  Dennis  and  the  following  children  were  born  to  that  marriage : 
Cornelia  O'Biyan,  deceased;  James  T.  O'Bryan,  deceased  and  Ma  tie 
O'Bryan,  deceased.  To  Redick  O'Bryan's  third  marriage  with  Mrs.  Eliza 
Dameron  who  was  the  mother  of  two  children  by  her  former  marriage, 
William  H.  Dameron,  deceased  and  Mrs.  Julia  D.  Minor  of  St.  Louis,  were 
bom  the  following  children:  John,  deceased;  Minnie,  married  Hon.  Wil- 
liam T.  Heathman,  a  former  representative  from  Randolph  County ;  Milton 
S.  O'Bryan,  manager  of  the  Harlan  Tobacco  Store,  Moberly. 

Owen  Redick  O'Bryan,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  was  born  June  12, 
1890  and  attended  the  White  school  district  in  Silver  Creek  township  until 
he  was  12  years  old  when  he  entered  the  Huntsville  grade  school  and  was 
graduated.  Later,  he  took  a  course  in  the  Moberly  Commercial  College 
and  was  graduated  in  1908.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash 
Railroad  Company  and  the  Express  Company  and  one  year  later  entered 
the  Kansas  City  School  of  Law  and  also  served  a  clerkship  in  Kansas  City 
law  offices  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  to  practice  in  the  state  courts  June 
2,  1913,  and  admitted  to  the  Federal  courts  May  19,  1914.  Shortly  after- 
wards, he  made  the  race  for  the  nomination  for  prosecuting  attorney  of 
Randolph  County  against  Jerry  M.  Jeffries  and  F.  E.  Murrell.  He  carried 
every  township  in  the  county  outside  of  Moberly,  except  Cairo,  and  was 
defeated  by  eight  votes.  In  1916,  he  made  a  second  race  for  the^  nomina- 
tion of  prosecuting  attorney  and  during  that  campaign  he  made  the  promise 
that  if  the  United  States  should  become  involved  in  the  World  War  he 
would  enlist.  He  had  an  opportunity  to  make  his  word  good  and  he  did, 
enlisting  at  Sedalia,  Mo.,  May  13,  1917  and  resigned  his  position  as  claim 
agent  for  the  M.  K.  and  T.  railroad  in  order  to  enlist.  After  enlisting,  he 
was  sent  to  Jefferson  Barracks,  Missouri  and  assigned  to  the  16th  Infantry 
and  from  there  entrained  to  El  Paso,  Texas,  but  was  ordered  overseas  be- 
fore reaching  his  destination.    He  was  reassigned  to  Company  A,  34th 


258  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Infantry  and  after  a  brief  period  of  training  at  Port  Bliss  he  was  detailed 
to  district  headquarters  in  July,  1917.  Later  he  was  given  a  furlough  and 
returned  home  and  on  Oct.  4,  1917  he  addressed  the  Old  Settlers  Reunion 
and  on  October  7th  he  argued  a  case  in  the  Kansas  Court  of  Appeals,  being 
the  first  lawyer  to  appear  before  that  court  in  uniform.  December  13th 
he  was  transferred  as  battalion  sergeant  to  headquarters  of  third  division 
Camp  Greene,  Charlotte,  N.  C.  He  left  Charlotte,  March  7,  1918  and 
arrived  at  Camp  Merritt  the  next  day  and  embarked  at  Hoboken,  N.  J.  on 
an  old  Austrian  steamer  which  had  been  renamed  "Martha  Washington". 
He  was  then  regimental  sergeant  major  and  commander  of  the  guard  every 
other  day.  At  12  o'clock  on  April  4th  in  the  Bay  of  Biscay  the  convoy 
was  attacked  by  German  submarines  and  a  running  fight  between  the  sub- 
marines and  the  United  States  chasers  and  convoys  took  place  until  the 
submarines  were  destroyed.  The  American  fleet  landed  at  Bordeaux, 
France,  on  April  4th.  The  third  division  then  went  into  training  quarters 
at  Chateau  Villian,  16  miles  south  of  .Chaumont,  the  A.  E.  F.  Headquarters. 
On  May  27th,  the  division  was  entrained  under  secret  orders  for  the  front 
lines  and  arrived  at  the  Marne  where  they  occupied  22  kilometers  of  front 
line  to  Ballou  Woods  on  the  left  and  extending  to  Charteves  Sector  which 
was  being  pressed  by  a  minor  German  offensive  which  extended  from 
Soissons  to  Reims.  On  July  14th  the  Germans  launched  their  last 
offensive  which  continued  for  four  days  and  gained  an  entrance  south  of 
the  river.  On  July  20th  the  United  States  army  started  an  offensive  and 
drove  the  Germans  back  to  the  Vesle  River.  The  third  division  was  re- 
lieved August  14th  and  transferred  to  a  recoupment  area.  This  division 
lost  60  per  cent  of  their  men  in  the  above  engagement.  Later  they  were 
ordered  to  the  St.  Mihiel  salient,  Sept.  5,  1918,  and  arrived  in  support  of 
the  89th  division.  Sept.  13,  Mr.  O'Bryan  was  transferred  to  the  89th 
division  headquarters  which  was  relieved  Oct.  6th  and  on  Oct.  11th  took 
a  position  in  the  Argonne  Forest.  After  30  days  of  hard  fighting  they 
were  on  the  Meuse  River,  Nov.  11th  when  the  armistice  was  signed.  They 
then  crossed  Belgium  and  Luxemburg  on  the  heels  of  the  retreating  Ger- 
man army.  They  remained  there  until  May  13,  1918  when  they  entrained 
at  Erodorf ,  Germany,  for  Brest,  France  and  embarked  for  America  by  way 
of  Plymouth,  England  and  reached  port  at  New  York.  Mr.  O'Bryan  was 
discharged  at  Camp  Funston,  Kan.  June  13,  1919. 

Mr.  O'Bryan  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  after  return- 
ing to  Moberly  and  has  a  good  practice.     He  is  a  capable  young  attorney 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  259 

and  has  a  wide  acquaintance  in  Mobeily  and  Randolph  County  and  stands 
high  in  the  community.  In  addition  to  his  general  practice  he  is  also 
assistant  prosecuting  attorney  of  Randolph  County. 

Mr.  O'Bryan  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows, 
the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons  and  holds 
membership  in  the  first  Baptist  church  at  El  Paso,  Texas. 

John  R.  Martin,  better  known  as  "Little  Dick,"  president  and  founder 
of  the  Little  Dick  Clothing  Company,  which  gets  its  title  from  Mr.  Mar- 
tin's nickname,  is  one  of  Moberly's  enterprising  and  successful  business 
men  and  a  descendant  of  one  of  Randolph  Counl^'s  honored  pioneer 
families. 

Mr.  Martin  has  had  a  varied  and  successful  career  in  the  mercantile 
business.  After  obtaining  a  good  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  he  began  as  a  clerk  in  the  employ  of  Mitchell  and  Moppin, 
of  Renick,  Mo.  Later  he  clerked  for  Clack  and  Parrish,  Nevada,  Mo.  He 
was  next  employed  by  Donihue  Brothers,  Kirksville,  Mo.  He  was  then-  in 
the  employ  of  O.  J.  Townsend,  Unionville,  Mo.,  for  a  time  when  he  re- 
turned to  Kirksville  and  took  charge  of  the  clothing  department  of  the 
Sam  Fickler  Store.  From  there  he  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  busi- 
ness, becoming  the  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Burkholder  and  Sol 
Martin.  Shortly  afterwards  he  sold  his  interest  in  that  firm  and  entered 
the  employ  of  Frank  B.  Forney  and  later  was  employed  by  Henry  Levy 
and  Company.  In  1897  he  engaged  in  the  clothing  business  under  the 
firm  name  of  the  Little  Dick  Clothing  Company  and  was  the  sole  owner 
and  proprietor  of  that  business  until  1911  when  he  sold  a  half  interest 
to  his  brother,  Forrest  Martin,  and  since  that  time  they  have  conducted 
the  business  under  the  original  firm  name  and  have  met  with  success, 
and  rank  as  one  of  the  leading  mercantile  establishments  of  Moberly  and 
Randolph  County.  They  carry  a  full  line  of  men's  and  boy's  clothing  and 
furnishings  and  in  the  range  of  quality  and  price  they  rank  with  the 
leading  retailers  of  the  country.  TPiey  carry  a  large  stock  and  in  the 
matter  of  style  they  are  ready  to  meet  the  demands  of  their  customers 
from  the  conservative  to  the  most  fastidious. 

Mr.  Martin  was  married  November  9,  1893,  to  Miss  Josie  Jamison, 
of  Kirksville,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Joseph  G.  Jamison,  who  is  now 
deceased. 

John  R.  Martin  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose. 


260  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  Martin  family  is  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  Randolph  County. 
John  R.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  was  born  in  Prairie  township  and  is 
the  son  of  Bailey  and  Martha  Ellen  (Davis)  Martin,  both  natives  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  the  former  of  whom  is  now  deceased  and  the  latter  resides 
on  the  old  Martin  homestead  in  Prairie  township.  A  more  extensive  his- 
tory of  this  pioneer  Randolph  County  family  and  its  various  members  ap- 
pears in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  Forrest  Martin  in  this  volume. 

John  R.  Martin  has  in  his  possession  an  interesting  volume  which 
is  devoted  to  the  history  of  the  Martin  family  which  was  written  by  his  , 
brother,  Prof.  W.  H.  Martin,  on  the  occasion  of  the  golden  wedding  anni- 
versary of  their  parents.  This  event  took  place  Feb.  18,  1902.  Professor 
Martin  presents  the  story  of  the  Martin  family  and  pays  tribute  to  the 
worthy  parents  of  this  large  family  of  thirteen  children  in  a  most  able 
manner,  which  was  read  at  the  wedding  anniversary.  In  this  article  he 
narrates  the  various  characteristics  of  the  thirteen  children  of  Bailey 
Martin  and  in  which  he  evinces  unusually  keen  observation  and  a  clear 
understanding  of  the  individual  traits  of  each,  member  of  the  family. 

The  Martin  family  is  one  of  the  interesting  pioneer  families  of  Ran- 
dolph County  and  every  member  is  a  worthy  descendant  of  worthy  an- 
cestors. 

Omar  Martin,  manager  of  the  shoe  department  of  the  Wolff-Berger 
Company,  has  been  identified  with  the  commercial  life  of  Moberly  for  the 
past  25  years  and  has  an  extensive  acquaintance  throughout  Randolph 
County  from  his  many  years  of  dealing  with  the  public. 

Mr.  Martin  is  a  native  son  of  this  county  and  was  born  in  Prairie 
township.  He  is  a  son  of  Bailey  and  Martha  Ellen  (Davis)  Martin.  The 
Martin  family  is  one  of  the  prominent  pioneer  families  of  Randolph 
County,  a  more  complete  history  of  which  will  be  found  in  connection  with 
the  biographical  sketches  of  John  R.  Martin  and  Forrest  Martin,  which 
appears  in  this  volume. 

Omar  Martin  was  reared  on  the  old  Martin  homestead  in  Prairie  town- 
ship and  attended  the  public  schools  of  Prairie  township  and  the  Moberly 
High  School.  After  leaving  school  he  entered  t?-e  employ  of  the  Felden- 
heimer  Dry  Goods  Company  of  Moberly  and  for  23  years  was  in  the 
employ  of  that  firm.  In  1917  the  Feldenheimer  Dry  Goods  Company  was 
succeeded  by  the  Wolff-Berger  Company  and  since  that  time  Mr.  Martin 
has  been  manager  of  the  shoe  department. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  261 

Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  Sept.  11,  1900,  with  Miss  Lucre- 
tia  Grimes,  of  Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Washington  and  Virginia 
Grimes,  pioneer  settlers  of  Moberly,  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased. 
Washington  Grimes  settled  here  about  the  time  that  the  town  of  Moberly 
was  founded  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  this  city.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Martin  now  resifle  in  the  old  Martin  home  at  319  Union  avenue,  where 
the  Grimes  family  lived  for  many  years  and  where  Mrs.  Martin  was  bom. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Omar  Martin  have  been  born  two  children:  Bailey, 
who  was  named  after  his  paternal  grandfather,  is  now  a  student  in  the 
Moberly  High  School  and  Virginia,  who  bears  the  name  of  her  maternal 
grandmother,  is  at  home  with  her  parents. 

Mr.  Martin  is  a  member  of  the- Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks. 

Jos«ph  Davis  Martin,  of  the  Little  Dick  Clothing  Company,  Moberly, 
Mo.,  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County.  He  was  born  in  Prairie  township, 
Feb.  23,  1868,  and  is  the  son  of  Bailey  and  Martha  Ellen  (Davis)  Martin. 
A  more  detailed  history  of  the  Martin  family  appears  in  the  sketches  of 
John  R.  Martin  and  Forrest  Martin,  which  will  be  found  in  this  volume. 

Joseph  Davis  Martin  was  reared  to  manhood  on  the  Martin  home 
farm  in  Prairie  township  and  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools. 
He  remained  on  the  home  farm,  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising  until 
1905,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  since  that  time  has  been  identified 
with  the  Little  Dick  Clothing  Company. 

Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  June  6,  1899,  with  Eureth  J. 
Wirt,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Sallie  (Hendrex)  Wirt,  of  Prairie  town- 
ship. James  Wirt  and  his  wife  were  pioneer  settlers  of  Randolph  County. 
Mr.  Wirt  was  an  early  day  plainsman,  crossing  the  plains  with  ox  teams 
in  1854.  He  kept  in  his  possession  during  his  lifetime  a  souvenir,  a  hunt- 
ing horn,  which  he  made  from  a  horn  of  one  of  the  oxen  which  he  drove 
on  his  trip  to  California.  It  is  artistically  designed  and  upon  it  is  carved 
the  figure  of  a  dog.  This  heirloom  is  in  Mr.  Martin's  possession  and  is 
prized  very  highly.    James  Wirt  and  his  wife  are  both  deceased. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  D.  Martin  have  been  born  two  children: 
Laura  Loretta  and  Sallie  Janice. 

Mr.  Martin  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  is 
a  Randolph  County  citizen  of  real  worth.  The  Martin  family  home  is 
at  900  Williams  street,  Moberly. 


262  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Henry  R.  Terrill,  of  the  firm  of  Terrill  Brothers,  which  is  composed  of 
Henry  R.  and  Vincent  C.  Terrill,  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  reliable  retail 
shoe  establishments  in  the  city  of  Moberly  and  has  an  extensive  patron- 
age. The  Terrill  Brothers  have  been  engaged  in  business  here  for  a 
number  of  years. 

The  Terrill  family  is  one  of  the  old  substantial  pioneer  families  of 
Randolph  County  and  the  various  members  of  this  family  have  been 
identified  with  the  growth  and  development  of  this  county  for  considerably 
more  than  half  a  century. 

Henry  R.  Terrill,  the  senior  member  of  the  firm  of  Terrill  Brothers, 
is  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and  was  bom  in  Sugar  Creek  township, 
Dec.  3,  1869.  He  is  a  son  of  John  R.  and  Ann  (Roberts)  Terrill.  John 
R.  Terrill  came  to  Randolph  County  about  1854  when  he  was  18  years  of 
age,  and  entered  government  land  about  two  miles  south  of  the  present 
city  of  Moberly  and  this  land  is  still  owned  by  his  descendants.  I'wo 
of  his  brothers,  James  and  Robert  Green,  served  in  the  Confederate  army 
and  both  were  killed.  James  Terrill  served  with  General  Price  and  was 
killed  and  Robert  Green  was  serving  with  General  Morgan's  command  in 
Kentucky  when  he  was  killed. 

John  R.  Terrill  was  a  son  of  William  Terrill,  who  came  to  Randolph 
County  at  the  same  time  that  his  son,  John  R.,  came  and  owned  an 
adjoining  farm.  He  was  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  was  in  that  state  on 
a  visit  at  the  time  of  his  death.  His  remains  were  brought  back  to 
Randolph  County  and  buried  in  Oakland  cemetery.  John  R.  Terrill,  father 
of  Henry  R.,  lived  on  the  same  farm  in  Randolph  County  for  50  years. 
He  died  in  1907.  His  wife  preceded  him  in  death  several  years,  having 
died  in  1875.     Their  remains  are  both  interred  in  Oakland  cemetery. 

Henry  R.  Terrill  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  was  grad- 
uated from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  1890.  He  then  entered  the  Mis- 
souri University  at  Columbia  and  was  a  student  in  that  institution  for 
three  years,  after  which  he  was  engaged  in  farming  about  one  year. 
He  then,  in  partnership  with  Joe  W.  Mullen,  purchased  the  shoe  business 
of  Victor  and  Given  in  Moberly.  Later  he  sold  his  interest  to  Mr.  Mullen 
and  engaged  in  farming  for  about  four  years.  The  present  firm  of 
Terrill  Brothers  was  organized  and  they  engaged  in  the  retail  shoe  busi- 
ness which  they  have  since  continued  and  this  firm  is  now  one  of  the 
mercantile  landmarks  of  Moberly. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  263 

Henry  R.  Terrill  was  married  in  1896  to  Goldena  Mounce,  a  daughter 
of  A.  M.  and  Martha  (Morrison)  Mounce  of  Moberly.  A  history  of  the 
Mounce  family  appears  in  this  volume.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Terrill  have 
been  bom  the  following  children:  John  M.,  a  graduate  of  the  Moberly 
High  School  and  now  an  employe  in  the  Terrill  Brothers'  store;  Mar- 
garet Ruth,  also  a  graduate  of  the  Moberly  High  School,  is  bookkeeper 
for  Terrill  Brothers'  store;  Mary  Emma,  a  student  in  the  Missouri  Uni- 
versity; Robert,  Dorothy  and  Martha. 

John  M.  Terrill,  the  eldest  son  of  Henry  R.,  was  a  student  in  the 
University  of  Missouri  when  the  United  States  entered  the  World  War, 
and  in  1917  he  enlisted  in  the  Officers'  Training  School  at  Camp  Han- 
cock, Ga.,  and  was  attached  to.  the  15th  Company,  3rd  Battalion,  and 
was  stationed  at  Camp  Hancock  until  the  armistice  was  signed.  After 
receiving  his  training  he  was  retained  at  Camp  Hancock  as  a  military 
instructor  and  was  in  the  service  about  one  year.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  No.  6. 

Merrill  A.  Romans,  of  the  bridge  construction  department  of  the 
Lynch-McDonald  Construction  Company,  of  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  best 
practical  bridge  men  in  the  state.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri  and  was 
bom  in  Callaway  County,  Oct.  14,  1873,  a  son  of  H.  P.  0.  and  Sarah 
Bell  (Wilson)  Romans.  The  father  was  also  a  native  of  Callaway  County 
and  was  bom  in  1844.  He  died  at  Greely,  Colo.,  in  1916,  and  the  mother 
now  resides  at  Salida,  Colo.,  and  is  68  years  old.  They  were  the  parents 
of  the  following  children :  Charles  Edwards,  Kersey,  Colo. ;  Merritt  A., 
the  subject  of  this  sketch ;  Albert  H.  Loveland,  Colo. ;  James  P.  Kersey, 
Colo. ;  Samuel  A.,  Boise,  Idaho ;  W.  F.,  lives  in  Colorado,  and  Virginia  E., 
married  Alfred  Owen,  and  they  reside  at  Salida,  Colo. 

Merritt  A.  Romans  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  since  he 
was  16  years  of  age  has  made  his  way  in  the  world.  He  has  had  an 
extensive  experience  in  bridge  construction,  first  entering  this  line  of 
work  with  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  and  for  eight  years  was  in  the 
^employ  of  that  company,  and  for  the  last  fifteen  years  has  been  with  the 
Pan  American  Bridge  Company.  He  travels  and  manages  the  construc- 
tion of  the  bridge  department  of  the  Lynch-McDonald  Construction  Com- 
pany. 

Mr.  Romans  was  married  in  October,  1900,  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Bu- 
chanan, of  Trenton,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  A.  H.  and  Nannie  (Hale) 
Buchanan,  who  now  reside  at  Moberly.     To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Romans  have 


264  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

been  born  two  daughters:  Elizabeth  E.  and  Virginia  M.,  both  of  whom 
are  students  in  the  Moberly  High  School.  Mr.  Roman  is  a  member  of  the 
Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security  and  stands  high  in  Moberly  and  Randolph 
County.    The  family  residence  is  at  514  South  Fourth  street. 

H.  Frank  Holman,  public  administrator  of  Randolph  County,  senior 
partner  in  the  Peoples  Steam  Laundry  and  vice-president  of  the  Moberly 
Chamber  of  Commerce  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  progressive  citizens 
of  Randolph  County.  Mr.  Holman  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and  a 
descendant  of  one  of  the  early  prominent  pioneer  families  of  this  part 
of  the  state.  He  was  born  in  Chariton  township,  Randolph  County,  Feb. 
12,  1861  and  is  a  son  of  James  M.  and  Margaret  L.  (Harlan)  Holman. 

James  M.  Holman  was  also  a  native  of  Randolph  County,  born  in 
Chariton  township,  March  20,  1831.  He  was  a  son  of  Joseph  Holman, 
who  was  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  a  pioneer  of  Chariton  township,  Ran- 
dolph County,  where  he  settled  at  a  very  early  date.  James  M.  Holman 
died  Nov.  18,  1907  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  Mt.  Carmel  cemetery. 
He  spent  his  life  in  this  county  and  was  one  of  its  successful  citizens. 
He  was  a  progressive  farmer  and  stockman  and  influential  in  the  county. 
Margaret  L.  (Harlan)  Holman,  his  wife  preceeded  her  husband  in  death 
a  number  of  years.  She  died  in  1887  and  her  remains  are  also  buried  in 
Mt.  Carmel  cemetery.  They  were  the  parents  of  seven  children  of  whom 
H.  Frank  is  the  only  one  living.  The  others  are  Mrs.  Martha  J.  Cobb, 
Mrs.  Mary  Foster,  George  I.,  Mrs.  Sarah  Thomas  and  two  died  in  infancy. 
After  the  death  of  his  first  wife  James  M.  Holman  married  Mrs.  Bettie 
(Hurt)  Powell  and  one  son  was  bom  to  this  union,  Payton  Y.  Holman, 
who  lives  in  Chariton  township. 

H.  Frank  Holman  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  educated  in  the 
public  schools  and  for  ten  years  was  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  rais- 
ing. In  1892  he  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  the  real  estate  and  in- 
surance business.  Later  he  disposed  of  his  business  and  went  west  on 
account  of  his  wife's  health  and  upon  his  return  to  Moberly  in  1899  he 
engaged  in  the  laundry  business  which  he  purchased  from  J.  C.  Irvin. 
This  was  a  small  concern  at  that  time  and  had  been  started  by  S.  S.  San- 
ford  who  sold  it  to  J.  J.  Stephens  before  J.  C.  Irvin  owned  it.  This  was 
the  beginning  of  the  Peoples  Steam  Laundry  which  has  developed  to  its 
present  proportions  since  Mr.  Holman  purchased  it.  The  laundry  was 
formerly  operated  in  a  building  25x75  feet  and  now  occupies  a  building 
100x120  feet,  located  on  the  corner  of  North  Williams  and  Rollins  streets 


H.    FRANK    HOLMW 


HISTORY  OP  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  265 

In  what  is  known  as  the  Holman  building.  This  is  one  of  the  best 
equipped  laundries  in  the  country  and  does  an  extensive  business.  H. 
Frank  Holman's  son,  James  W.,  is  a  partner  in  the  laundry  business  and 
is  the  superintendent. 

For  the  past  nine  years  H.  Frank  Holman  has  been  engaged  in  road 
work.  He  is  president  of  the  Moberly  Special  Road  District  and  has 
charge  of  the  Moberly  Road  District.  He  is  president  of  the  North  Mis- 
souri Cross  State  Highway  from  St.  Louis  to  Kansas  City  via  Moberly. 
The  work  so  far  has  been  confined  largely  to  grading  and  bridge  building. 
Mr.  Holman  has  made  a  careful  study  of  road  improvement  work  and  is 
working  out  some  of  the  problems  of  this  difficult  question  very  satis- 
factorily and  making  splendid  progress.  He  is  now  serving  his  third 
term  as  public  administrator  of  Randolph  County. 

Mr.  Holman  has  been  twice  married.  His  first  wife,  Miss  Linda  S. 
Vasse  to  whom  he  was  married  in  1887,  died  Nov.  23,  1898.  Two  chil- 
dren were  born  to  this  union,  J.  W.,  who  is  his  father's  partner  in  the 
Peoples  Steam  Laundry  and  Percey  F.,  who  was  a  railway  brakeman  and 
killed  in  an  accident  at  Walsenburg,  Colo.  Mr.  Holman  was  married  the 
second  time  to  Miss  Minnie  Guy,  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  in  1908,  and  one  child 
has  been  bom  to  this  union,  Raymond  G.,  who  is  nine  years  of  age. 

Mr.  Holman  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  the  Knights 
of  Pythias  Lodge.  He  is  vice-president  of  the  Moberly  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce. He  is  one  of  the  widely  known  progressive  and  enterprising 
citizens  of  Randolph  County  who  stands  ever  ready  to  do  his  part  to  pro- 
mote the  betterment  and  upbuilding  of  his  native  county  and  its  institu- 
tions. 

Frank  Hartley  E'still. — The  Estill  Floral  Company  of  Moberly  of  which 
Frank  Hartley  Estill  is  the  owner  and  manager,  is  one  of  the  impor- 
tant industrial  enterprises  of  this  city.  It  was  founded  in  1906  by 
Mrs.  Rebecca  S.  Estill,  mother  of  Frank  H.  Estill.  The  greenhouses,  of 
which  there  are  seven,  are  located  at  707  Gilman  street.  Seven  of 
these  houses  are  16x90  feet  and  one  of  them  is  30x100  feet.  The  com- 
pany has  its  own  water  system  and  the  greenhouses  occupy  five  acres 
of  (ground  between  Carpenter  and  Gilman  streets  and  Fort  street  and 
the  city  limits.  There  is  employed  here  a  regular  force  of  five  men 
and  during  the  summer  season  several  more.  This  company  does  an 
extensive  business  in  flowers,  floral  designs  and  plants  and  90  per  cent, 
of  the  business  done  by  this  concern  is  outside  of  the  city  of  Moberly. 


266  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Orders  are  filled  from  various  towns  and  cities  over  a  broad  scope  of 
territory. 

Frank  Hartley  Estill  is  a  veteran  of  the  World  War.  He  was 
reared  in  Moberly,  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  was  graduated 
from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  the  class  of  1910.  Afterwards  he 
attended  the  University  of  Missouri  for  two  terms  and  since  that  time, 
except  the  time  spent  in  the  army  during  the  World  War,  he  has  de- 
voted himself  to  the  management  of  the  Estill  Floral  Company. 

Frank  H.  Estill  is  a  son  of  H.  V.  and  Rebecca  S.  (Hendricks)  Estill. 
The  father  was  bom  in  Charleston,  W.  Va.,  Feb.  2,  1856,  and  died  at 
Moberly  Dec.  4,  1919.  H.  V.  Estill  came  to  Moberly  from  his  native 
state  about  1884.  He  was  a  civil  engineer  and  for  some  time  was  in  the 
employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company.  He  installed  the  city  water 
works  of  Moberly  and  for  20  years  was  superintendent  of  that  depart- 
ment and  resigned  from  that  position  in  order  to  devote  his  attention 
to  the  floral  business  in  -which  he  was  engaged  for  a  number  of  years. 
Rebecca  S.  (Hendricks)  Estill  was  bom  in  old  Milton,  Randolph  County, 
and  was  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  very  early  pioneer  families  of  this 
county.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Capt.  Stephen  M.  Hendricks,  a  Con- 
federate veteran  who  enlisted  in  Randolph  County  and  served  under 
General  Sterling  Price  until  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  killed  at 
the  battle  of  Corinth,  Miss.  John  Dameron,  great  grandfather  of  Frank 
Hartley  Estill,  on  the  maternal  side,  was  a  pioneer  merchant  of  Milton, 
Randolph  County.  He  spent  his  life  here  and  is  buried  in  Oakland  ceme- 
tery. Mrs.  Estill  died  April  4,  1916,  aged  54  years,  and  is  buried  in 
Oakland  cemetery. 

July  24,  1918,  Frank  H.  Estill  enUsted  in  the  United  States  army 
at  Moberly  and  was  sent  to  Camp  Funston  for  training  and  after  three 
months  there  he  was  transferred  to  Camp  Mills,  N.  Y.,  and  about  Nov. 
1,  1918,  he  embarked  for  France,  a  member  of  Brigade  Headquarters, 
10th  Field  Artillery,  with  the  rank  oi  corporal.  He  then  was  stationed 
at  Camp  DeSouge,  near  Bordeaux,  where  he  was  trained  for  service  as 
a  wireless  telegraph  operator.  After  the  armistice  was  signed  he  re- 
mained in  France  until  March,  1919,  when  he  was  retumed  to  the  Un^ed 
States  and  received  his  honorable  discharge  at  Camp  Grant,  111.,  March 
31,  1919. 

Mr.  Estill  is  a  member  of  the  American  Legion,  Theodore  Bazan 
Post,  and  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  Moberly  Lodge  No. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  267 

344.  He  also  holds  membership  in  the  Moberly  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association.  He  is  one  of  the  progressive 
and  enterprising  young  men  of  Moberly  and  has  a  wide  business  ac- 
quaintance and  many  friends. 

Judge  Frank  B.  Forney,  manager  of  the  Forney  Clothing  Company, 
and  a  member  of  the  Board  of  County  Judges  of  Randolph  County.  He 
is  a  native  of  this  county  and  was  born  on  a  farm  six  miles  from  Mober- 
ly, and  when  he  was  two  years  of  age  his  parents  moved  to  Moberly. 
He  is  the  son  of  D.  S.  and  Henrietta  (Batty)  Forney,  the  former  a 
native  of  Virginia,  and  the  latter  of  Ohio.  A  more  extensive  review 
of  the  Forney  family  history  will  be  found  in  connection  with  the  biogra- 
phical sketch  of  I.  B.  Forney,  a  brother  of  Frank  B.,  which  appears  in 
this  volume. 

Frank  B.  Forney  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Moberly, 
and  began  his  mercantile  career  in  his  father's  store  in  Moberly,  his 
father  being  one  of  the  pioneer  merchants  of  this  city,  and  was  engaged 
in  business  here  for  many  years. 

Frank  B.  Forney  remained  in  his  father's  store  until  1890,  when  he 
engaged  in  the  clothing  business  at  Moberly,  and  has  continuously  been 
in  that  business  to  the  present  time^  and  the  Forney  Clothing  Company 
of  today  is  the  outgrowth  of  this  humble  beginning  thirty  years  ago. 

The  Forney  Clothing  Company  is  one  of  the  extensive  commercial 
enterprises  of  its  kind  in  central  Missouri.  They  deal  in  men's  and  boys' 
ready  to  wear  clothing  and  furnishing  goods,  and  few  cities  of  the 
size  of  Moberly  have  the  advantage  of  such  an  extensive  mercantile 
establishment,  which  offers  such  a  wide  range  in  style  and  quality  as 
does  the  Forney  Clothing  Company.  The  business  is  located  at  318-320 
West  Reed  street.  The  building  is  owned  by  the  company  and  has  a 
frontage  of  30  feet  and  is  110  feet  deep.  There  are  two  stories,  the 
upper  one  of  which  is  used  for  storing  the  surplus  stock.  The  com- 
pany employs  eight  clerks,  most  of  whom  have  been  with  the  company 
for  several  years.  George  Sours  has  been  with  the  Forney  Clothing 
Company  for  29  years;  Arthur  McCully,  14  years;  Herbert  Lamb,  11 
years;  Buckner  Nave,  8  years;  Arthur  Grimes,  23  years;  Ernest  Ellin- 
ger,  7  years;  Paul  Burton,  2  years;  and  Lowel  Sours,  who  died  in  1919, 
had  been  with  the  company  for  24  years. 

Frank  B.  Forney  was  married  in  June,  1893,  to  Miss  Myrtle  Tucker, 
of  Mexico,  Mo.     She  is  a  daughter  of  J.  D.  Tucker,  who  was  .a  pioneer 


268  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

merchant  and  capitalist  of  Mexico,  Mo.,  and  is  now  deceased.  To  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Forney  have  been  bom  the  following  children:  Francis,  a 
student  in  the  Moberly  High  School;  Daniel,  also  a  student  in  the  Mob- 
erly  High  School;  Dorothy  and  Betty,  students  in  the  ward  school. 

Mr.  Forney  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  member  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine,  and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Mr. 
Forney  is  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  Moberly,  whose  career 
has  been  a  successful  one.  He  has  an  extensive  acquaintance  through- 
out Randolph  County,  and  Missouri. 

In  the  spring  of  1920,  Mr.  Forney  was  appointed  to  the  office  of 
county  judge  by  Governor  Gardner  to  fill  out  an  unexpired  term,  and 
he  is  giving  the  same  careful  attention  to  the  public  affairs  of  Ran- 
dolph County  that  he  has  to  his  private  affairs.  Judge  Forney  is  a 
member  of  Governor  Gardner's  staff. 

Yoder  and  Yoder.  This  firm  consists  of  Dr.  Samuel  J.  Yoder  and 
his  wife.  Dr.  Delia  Yoder,  well-known  chiropractors  of  Moberly,  who 
have  been  engaged  in  the  practice  here  since  1917.  Dr.  Samuel  J. 
Yoder  was  born  in  McLean  County,  111.,  Aug.  26,  1866.  He  is  a  son 
of  Jonathan  and  Catherine  (Balliman)  Yoder,  who  now'  resides  at  Car- 
lock,  111.  The  father  is  80  years  of  age  and  the  mother  is  75  years  old. 
Jonathan  Yoder  is  a  son  of  Samuel  Yoder,  who  was  a  native  of  Penn- 
sylvania, and  a  pioneer  in  Ohio  and  Illinois. 

The  children  bom  to  Jonathan  and  Catherine  (Balliman)  Yoder  are 
as  follow:  Milo  F.,  Gibson  City,  111.;  John  W.,  Danvers,  111.;  J.  E.,  Dan- 
vers,  111.;  Judson,  Danvers,  111.;  Carey,  Danvers,  111.;  Chester  L..  Ver- 
non, 111.;  Minnie,  married  Albert  Frey,  Carlock,  111.;  Alice,  married  Fred 
Spencer,  Danvers,  111.;  Eura,  married  Herman  Sthaly,  Aurora,  Neb.,  and 
Dr.  Samuel  J.,  who  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth. 

Dr.  Samuel  J.  Yoder  received  a  good  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Illinois  and  then  the  Palmer  School  at  Davenj)ort,  Iowa,  where  he  took 
a  chiropractic  course.  Doctor  Yoder  was  married  to  Miss  Delia  S.  Wil- 
hite,  a  native  of  Woodford  County,  111.  She  is  a  daughter  of  James  C. 
and  Eliza  J.  (Sawyers)  Wilhite,  both  of  whom  are  deceased;  the  mother 
died  at  the  age  of  37  at  Summer,  111.,  in  1876,  and  the  father  died  in  St. 
Louis  in  March,  1918,  at  the  age  of  80  years.  They  were  the  parents 
of  the  following  children:  Theodore  S.,  Decatur,  111.;  Leander  C,  Wich- 
ita, Kan. ;  John  A.,  Wichita,  Kan.,  and  James  Edwin,  O'Fallon,  111.  After 
the  death  of  the  mother  of  the  above  children,  the  father  was  married 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  269 

again,  and  to  that  union  were  born  the  following  children:  Scott  Wil- 
hite,  a  county  judge  at  Mt.  Carmel,  111.;  Alice,  married  William  Fulbright, 
St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Emma  S.,  married  Bert  Brown,  of  St.  Francisville,  111. 
The  following  children  of  James  C.  Wilhite  are  deceased,  Hattie  S.  died 
at  the  age  of  ten  years;  Rosander  C,  died  in  infancy;  Lillie  N.,  died  at 
the  age  of  16  years  and  Laura  B.,  died  at  the  age  of  six. 

Doctor  Yoder  and  his  wife  began  practice  in  Davenport,  Iowa,  and 
in  1917  began  the  practice  of  their  profession  at  Moberly  and  since  estab- 
lishing themselves  here  they  have  built  up  an  extensive  practice.  Doctor 
Yoder  says  that  chiropractics  has  to  its  credit  from  85  to  90  per  cent,  of 
recoveries  of  cases,  a  majority  of  which  are  of  the  so-called  chronic  na- 
'  ture.  He  says  according  to  statistics  taken  during  the  flu  epidemic  that 
only  one  case  out  of  861  was  lost;  that  these  statistics  cover  the  entire 
United  States  and  were  obtained  from  chiropractors  throughout  the  coun- 
try by  Doctor  B.  J.  Palmer,  president  of  the  Palmer  School  at  Davenport, 
Iowa,  who  sent  out  10,000  cards  to  practicing  chiropractors,  and  the  sta- 
tistics was  compiled  from  these  cards. 

In  connection  with  the  Palmer  School  at  Davenport,  Iowa,  a  free 
clinic  is  being  conducted  daily  where  from  1,200  to  1,500  patients  are 
being  adjusted,  arid  by  this  method  the  students  obtain  a  knowledge  of 
giving  spinal  adjustments. 

Since  coming  to  Moberly  Doctor  Yoder  and  his  wife  have  made  many 
friends  and  stand  high  in  the  community. 

Robert  M.  Rucker,  of  the  firm  of  Rucker  Brothers,  leading  drug- 
gists of  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  Missouri.  He  was  born  in  Sturgeon,  Mo., 
in  1881,  and  is  the  son  of  R.  D.  and  Lula  (Dusenbury)  Rucker.  R.  D. 
Rucker  was  born  at  Lynchburg,  Va.,  and  for  the  past  35  years  he  has 
been  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  at  Sturgeon,  Mo.  He  came  to 
Boone  County  just  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  and  was  engaged  in 
farming  and  stock  raising  until  he  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  at 
Sturgeon.  He  is  now  73  years  of  age  and  still  active  in  business.  Lula 
(Dusenbury)  Rucker  was  bom  in  St.  Louis  and  was  a  daughter  of  the 
late  Judge  Dusenbury  of  that  city.  She  died  in  May,  1911,  and  her 
remains  are  buried  at  Sturgeon. 

To  R.  D.  and  Lula  (Dusenbury)  Rucker  were  born  the  following 
children:  Edward  L.,  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Rucker  Brothers,  of 
Moberly;  F.  M.,  Sturgeon,  Mo.;  Robert  M.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch; 
W.  H.,  who  died  at  the  age  of  27  years;  and  E.  F.,  a  traveling  salesman, 
who  resides  at  Sturgeon,  Mo. 


270  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Robert  M.  Rucker  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Sturgeon, 
Mo.,  and  then  took  a  course  in  the  St.  Louis  School  of  Pharmacy.  He 
then  engaged  in  the  drug  business  at  Sturgeon  and  later  was  at  Higbee 
two  years  and  at  Huntsville  six  years.  For  the  past  eight  years  he  has 
been  in  Moberly  and  in  all  has  had  23  years  experience  in  the  drug 
business. 

In  1911  Robert  M.  and  his  brother,  Edward  L.  Rucker,  succeeded 
Doctor  Harlan,  who  formerly  conducted  the  drug  store  at  401  West 
Reed  street,  Moberly,  Mo.  This  is  one  of  the  well  established  and  high- 
class  drug  stores  of  Moberly,  and  the  Rucker  Brothers  are  doing  an 
extensive  business  which  has  ever  increased  in  volume  since  they  engaged 
in  business  here  nine  years  ago.  Their  prescription  department  is  com- 
plete, reliable  and  efficient.  They  carry  a  complete  line  of  drugs  and 
druggist's  sundries  and  have  a  well  equipped  soda  fountain  in  connection. 
The  Rucker  Brothers  are  both  progressive  and  enterprising  citizens  and 
rank  among  Moberly's  leading  business  men. 

Robert  M.  Rucker  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  member  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine,  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star  and  the  Benevolent  and  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks. 

J.  E.  Sanford,  proprietor  of  the  New  York  Store,  of  Moberly,  Mo., 
is  one  of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  business  men  of  Moberly  and 
Randolph  County. 

The  New  York  Store  was  founded  in  1915  by  J.  E.  Sanford  and  C.  0. 
Selders.  In  1920,  Mr.  Sanford  .purchased  his  partner's  interest  and  is 
now  the  sole  owner  and  proprietor.  The  New  York  Store  is  located  at 
309-311  West  Reed  street  and  occupies  a  frontage  of  60  feet.  This  store 
carries  a  full  line  of  dry  goods,  shoes,  men's  furnishings,  rugs  and  no- 
tions. Mr.  Sanford  aims  to  carry  a  popular  price  line  of  merchandise 
which  is  appreciated  by  the  buying  public,  and  he  has  built  up  an  exten- 
sive mercantile  business  in  comparatively  a  brief  period. 

J.  E.  Sanford  is  a  native  Missourian ;  he  was  bom  in  Monroe  County 
in  1886,  and  is  a  son  of  Jack  and  Sallie  (Barker)  Sanford.  The  former 
is  now  deceased,  and  mother  resides  at  Columbia,  Mo.  After  the  death 
of  her  first  husband  she  married  Henry  Jackson. 

J.  E.  Sanford  is  one  of  a  family  of  three  bom  to  his  parents,  the 
other  two  being  Mrs.  Nellie  Marr,  who  now  resides  in  Bismark,  N.  D., 
and  Mrs,  Pollie  Shanklin,  of  Fairfax,  Okla. 

Mr.  Sanford  married  Miss  Mae  Hill,  of  Rocheport,  Mo. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  271 

Before  engaging  in  the  merchantile  business  and  after  completing 
school,  Mr.  Sanford  was  engaged  in  teaching  and  followed  that  profession 
for  four  years;  Le  taught  school  at  Branham,  Monroe  County,  and  later 
at  Granville,  which  was  his  last  school.  He  was  a  successful  teacher,  but 
the  future  possibilities  of  teaching  as  a  profession  did  not  appeal  to 
him,  and  he  accordingly  turned  to  mercantile  pursuits.  His  first  mer- 
cantile venture  was  at  Centralia,  Mo.,  which  he  later  sold  and  came 
to  Moberly,  where  he  and  Mr.  Selders  founded  the  New  York  Store  as 
stated  in  a  preceding  paragraph. 

Mr.  Sanford  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
and  is  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  Moberly. 

C.  M.  Hulen,  clerk  of  the  circuit  court  of  Randolph  County,  bears 
the  distinction  of  being  the  youngest  circuit  clerk  in  the  state  of  Mis- 
souri. He  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County,  and  was  born  at  Clark, 
Nov.  25,  1894.  He  is  the  son  of  S.  P.  and  Ella  (Early)  Hulen,  both  na- 
tives of  Missouri  and  descendants  of  pioneer  families  of  this  state. 

S.  P.  Hulen  was  born  near  Hallsville,  Boone  County,  Missouri,  in 
1863.  He  came  to  Randolph  County  when  he  was  17  years  of  age,  and 
soon  afterwards  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  at  Clark,  where  he 
successfully  carried  on  business  for  six  years.  He  then  engaged  in  the 
banking  business,  and  for  the  past  28  years  has  been  cashier  of  hte  Clark 
Exchange  Bank.  Ella  (Early)  Hulen  was  born  near  Centralia  in  Boone 
County,  and  is  a  daughter  of  S.  W.  and  Ruth  Early,  pioneers  of  Boone 
County.  The  Early  family  came  from  Kentucky  to  Missouri  in  the  pio- 
neer days  of  this  state.  See  sketch  of  S.  P.  Hulen  on  another  page  in  this 
volume. 

To  S.  P.  and  Ella  (Early)  Hulen  have  been  born  the  following  chil- 
dren; V.  E.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  oil  business  at  ElDorado,  Kan.;  C.  M., 
the  subject  of  this  sketch;  R.  P.,  chief  teller  in  the  Mechanics  Saving 
Bank  at  Moberly,  and  Mary  Elizabeth,  resides  at  home  with  her  parents. 

C.  M.  Hulen  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Randolph  County, 
and  the  Missouri  University  at  Columbia.  When  he  left  school  he  became 
assistant  cashier  of  the  Exchange  Bank  of  Clark,  Mo.,  and  served  in 
that  capacity  for  five  years.  When  he  was  23  years  old,  in  1917,  Mr. 
Hulen  was  elected  clerk  of  the  circuit  court  of  Randolph  County,  and  so 
far  as  known  is  the  youngest  man  in  the  state  holding  a  similar  posi- 
tion. He  is  capable  and  obliging  and  has  many  friends  and  extensive 
acquaintance  throughout  Randolph  County. 


272  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Mr.  Hulen  was  married  Nov.  25,  1915/ to  Miss  Minnie  Mae  Wright, 
daughter  of  William  and  Ersie  (Fray)  Wright,  of  Clark,  Mo.,  where 
Mrs.  Hulen  was  bom. 

Mr.  Hulen  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodman  of  America,  the 
Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  and  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons. 

Clyde  Miller,  proprietor  of  the  Jefferson  Cigar  Store  at  207  Reed 
street  is  one  of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  young  business  men  of 
Moberly.  He  is  a  native  of  West  Virginia,  born  in  Wheeling,  March  13, 
1887.  He  is  a  son  of  George  and  May  (Forney)  Miller.  The  mother  was 
a  daughter  of  D.  S.  Fornay,  a  pioneer  merchant  of  Moberly,  further  men- 
tion of  whom  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  She  died  in  January, 
1889  and  is  buried  at  Wellsburg,  W.  Va. 

George  Miller,  father  of  Clyde  Miller,  is  now  engaged  in  the  grain 
business  at  Erie,  Pa.  His  father,  the  grandfather  of  Clyde  Miller,  was  a 
soldier  in  the  Revolutionary  War  and  George  Miller  served  in  the  Civil 
War  and  he  had  a  brother,  William  Miller,  who  also  served  in  the  Civil 
War  as  a  captain.     Both  enlisted  in  West  Virginia. 

Clyde  Miller  is  one  of  the  following  children  bom  to  his  parents: 
Mrs.  C.  F.  McCord,  Cleveland,  Ohio;  Mrs.  William  Wright,  Wheeling,  W. 
Va. ;  Mrs.  H.  H.  Phillips,  Dunkirk,  Ind. ;  George,  Los  Angeles,  Calif.,  and 
Clyde,  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Clyde  Miller  attended  the  public  schools  in  Wheeling,  W.  Va.,  and 
the  Moberly  High  School  and  since  he  was  ten  years  old  has  made  his 
own  way  in  the  world.  He  is  a  wide  awake  business  man  of  the  pro- 
gressive type  and  has  built  up  an  extensive  business.  He  is  courteous 
and  obliging  and  has  made  many  friends  during  the  course  of  his  busi- 
ness career  in  Moberly.  He  engaged  in  his  present  business  ^t  207 
West  Reed,  Oct.  4,  1914.  He  carries  a  full  line  of  cigars,  tobacco  and 
smokers'  accessories  and  also  candies.  In  connection  with  his  other 
business  he  conducts  the  Illinois  Coal  Company,  which  is  incorporated  at 
$10,000,  and  Mr.  Miller  is  secretary  of  this  company.  His  billiard  room 
is  well  equipped  and  conducted  on  a  high-class  plane  and  is  one  of  the 
popular  amusement  places  of  Moberly. 

Mr.  Miller  was  married  Oct.  4,  1919,  to  Miss  Ruth  Marie  Durham 
of  Kansas  City.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Marshal  S.  and  Effie  (Hubbard) 
Durham.  The  mother  died  when  Mrs.  Miller  was  an  infant  and  the 
father  now  resides  at  Clark,  Mo. 


\\o^  xTf 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  .273 

Mr.  Miller  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  the  Country  Club  and  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  No.  6,  the  American 
Legion,  of  which  he  is  a  charter  member.  He  is  a  Knights  Templar 
Mason  and  a  member  of  the  Shrine. 

During  the  World  War,  Clyde  Miller  enlisted  at  Columbia,  Mo.,  June 
5,  1918.  After  taking  a  special  course  of  instruction  at  the  gas  engine 
school  at  Columbia,  he  was  made  an,  instructor  and  from  there  was  sent 
to  Camp  Grant,  111.,  to  the  officers'  training  school,  and  had  just  about 
completed  his  course  when  the  armistice  was  signed.  He  was  discharged 
Jan.  18,  1919,  after  having  served  about  nine  months  with  the  rank  of 
sergeant. 

Emil  Gutekunst,  a  prominent  member  of  the  Randolph  County  bar, 
and  one  of  the  leading  lawyers  of  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  this  county. 
He  was  bom  in  Moberly,  Oct.  15,  1878,  and  is  a  son  of  George  and 
Emilie  (Walz)  Gutekunst,  early  settlers  of  Randolph  County,  who  came 
here  in  1872.  For  many  years  the  father  was  engaged  in  the  mercantile 
business  here  and  is  now  living  retired  at  201  South  Clark  street. 

George  and  Emilie  (Walz)  Gutekunst  are  the  parents  of  the  follow- 
ing children:  George,  Jr.,  lives  in  Montana;  Emil  F.,  the  subject  of 
this  sketch;  Arthur,  chief  clerk  in  the  Moberly  postoffice;  Fred,  a  grocer 
in  Moberly,  and  Carl,  a  teacher  in  the  Kansas  City  High  School.  Dur- 
ing the  World  War  he  was  instructor  of  French  in  the  officers'  training 
school  at  Fort  Riley.  He  was  a  teacher  in  the  Moberly  High  School 
prior  to  the  war  and  enlisted  from  here. 

Emil  F.  Gutekunst  was  reared  in  Moberly  and  educated  in  the  pub- 
lic schools.  After  obtaining  a  good  education,  he  read  law  and  was 
admitted  to  the  bar  in  1904  and  began  the  practice  of  his  profession  in 
Moberly,  where  he  has  continued  until  the  present  time.  He  has  a  well 
equipped  office  and  library  at  208  North  Williams  street  and  has  an  ex- 
tensive practice.  While  his  practice  is  of  a  general  nature  he  gives  spe- 
cial attention  to  probate  court  practice  and  the  settlement  of  estates. 

Mr.  Gutekunst  was  married  in  1907  to  Miss  Dola  L.  Kaufman,  of 
Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  George  W.  and  Olive  (Lindsay)  Kauf- 
man of  Moberly.  Mr.  Kaufman  came  from  Illinois  to  Missouri  and  is 
now  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  here.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gutekunst 
have  been  bom  one  daughter,  Olive  Emilie. 

Mr.  Gutekunst  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  Church  and  has 
served  as  elder  for  the  past  fifteen  years  and  for  ten  years  was  superin- 


274  HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY 

tendent  of  the  Sunday  school.  Mr.  Gutekunst  has  an  extensive  acquaint- 
ance in  Moberly  and  Randolph  County  and  stands  high  among  his  fel- 
low members  of  the  bar  as  well  as  among  his  friends  and  neighbors. 

Frank  B.  Wegs,  owner  and  proprietor  of  the  Moberly  Cornice  Works, 
is  one  of  the  leading  sheet  metal  workers  and  tinners  and  probably  the  old- 
est in  the  business  in  Moberly.  He  is  "a  native  of  Illinois  and  was  bom 
in  Brown'  County,  111.,  May  16,  1872.  His  parents  were  John  B.  and 
Catherine  (Stark)  Wegs,  both  of  whom  are  deceased.  The  mother  died 
at  Quincy,  111.,  1907,  and  the  father  died  in  1903,  and  their  remains  are 
buried  in  St.  Francis  cemetery,  Quincy,  111.  They  were  the  parents  of 
the  following  children:  Mrs.  Louise  Newman,  deceased;  Mrs.  Gertrude 
Rupp,  Moberly,  Mo.;  Frank  B.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Henry,  Quincy, 
111;,  and  William,  Quincy,  111.  The  mother  of  these  children  was  twice 
married,  her  first  husband  being  a  Mr.  Karsteiner  and  three  children 
were  bom  to  that  union:  John  and  Barney,  of  Quincy,  111.,  and  Mrs.  Liz- 
zie Wegs,  Mt.  Sterling,  111. 

Frank  B.  Wegs  was  educated  in  the  parochial  schools  at  Mt.  Sterling, 
111.,  and  he  also  attended  the  district  schools.  He  has  made  his  own 
way  in  the  world  since  he  was  12  years  of  age.  At  the  age  of  15,  he 
began  working  at  the  tinner's  trade  at  Quincy,  111.,  and  18  months 
later  he  went  to  Monroe  City,  Mo.,  where  he  remained  about  a  year. 
In  1886  he  came  to  Moberly  and  worked  at  the  sheet-metal  and  tinner's 
trade  for  Ben  Kanstnier  for  eleven  years,  after  which  he  was  engaged 
in  farming  for  eight  years  and  in  1908  he  bought  Mr.  Kanstnier's  business 
and  since  that  time  has  been  engaged  in  business  for  himself  at  Moberly. 
He  does  all  kinds  of  sheet  metal  and  warm  air  heating  work.  He  owns 
his  own,  building  which  is  located  at  111  West  Coates  street  and  is 
unusually  well  equipped  to  handle  his  line  of  work.  His  building  was 
destroyed  by  fire  Jan.  18,  1911,  when  the  O'Keef  building  bumed.  Mr. 
Wegs  immediately  rebuilt  and  on  the  3rd  of  the  following  March,  about 
40  days  from  the  date  of  the  fire,  he  had  rebuilt  and  his  building  was 
ready  for  occupancy. 

Mr.  Wegs  was  married  May  30,  1894,  to  Miss  Mary  Stinkamp,  a 
daughter  of  Herman  Stinkamp,  of  Moberly.  He  is  now  deceased  and 
his  widow  lives  in  Moberly.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wegs  have  been  born  eight 
children  as  follows:  Loretta,  married  Frank  Davit,  Moberly;  Hilda,  mar- 
ried Earnest  Wingfield,  Moberly;  Clarence,  Mabel,  Emil,  Helen,  Marie 
and  Regina,  all  residing  at  home  with  their  parents.  They  have  two 
grandchildren,  William  Davit  and  James  Wingfield. 

Mr.  Wegs  is  one  of  Moberly's  substantial  business  men. 


HISTOKY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  275 

Dr.  Chambers  B.  Clapp,  chief  surgeon  of  the  Wabash  Hospital  at 
Moberly,  who  also  owns  and  conducts  the  Woodland  Hospital  in  this 
city,  is  one  of  the  skilled  and  widely  known  physicians  and  surgeons 
of  the  state.  Doctor  Clapp  is  a  native  of  lUinois.  He  was  born  in  Dan- 
ville, 111.,  Nov.  21,  1858.  His  parents  were  George  A.  and  Catherine 
(Brown)  Clapp.  George  A.  Clapp  was  a  native  of  North  Carolina  and 
a  pioneer  settler  of  Vermillion  County,  111.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occu- 
pation and  when  the  Civil  War  broke  out  he  enlisted  in  the  125th  Regi- 
ment, Illinois  Infantry,  and  served  in  the  Union  army  for  three  and  one- 
half  years.  He  enlisted  as  a  private  and  was  promoted  from  time  to 
time  during  the  course  of  his  military  career  until  he  became  a  first 
lieutenant  and  held  that  rank  when  he  received  his  honorable  discharge 
and  was  mustered  out  of  the  service  at  the  close  of  the  war. 

Doctor  Clapp's  mother  died  when  she  was  21  years  of  age,  leaving 
three  motherless  children:  Dr.  Chambers  B.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch, 
and  Isaac  D.,  twins,  the  latter  of  whom  is  a  farmer  in  Florida,  and  Mrs. 
0.  J.  Matthews,  of  Minatare,  Neb.  After  the  death  of  his  first  wife  the 
father  was  again  married  and  moved  his  family  to  Nebraska,  where 
he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  died  in  1916  at  the  age  of  78 
years. 

Doctor  Clapp  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  district  schools 
of  Vermillion  County,  111.,  and  Nebraska.  Later  he  attended  the  State 
Normal  School  of  Nebraska,  after  which  he  was  engaged  in  the  drug 
business  for  a  time  at  Brock,  Neb.  He  then  went  to  Philadelphia  and 
took  a  course  in  the  Philadelphia  College  of  Pharmacy  and  was  graduated 
in  1882.  He  then  returned  to  Danville,  111.,  where  he  was  in  the  drug 
business  for  four  years  w?.en  he  went  to  Chicago  and  was  engaged  in  the 
same  business  for  two  years.  He  read  medicine  under  private  preceptors 
and  entered  Rush  Medical  College  at  Chicago,  where  he  was  graduated 
with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  in  the  class  of  1889. 

After  receiving  his  degree.  Doctor  Clapp  again  returned  to  Dan- 
ville, 111.,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  about 
one  year  when  he  received  the  appointment  of  local  surgeon  for  the 
Wabash  Railway  Company  at  Moberly,  Mo.,  and  immediately  came  here. 
The  Wabash  Hospital  was  completed  the  same  year  and  ready  for  occu- 
pancy in  1891  and  since  that  time  Doctor  Clapp  has  had  charge  of  that 
institution.  During  this  long  period  of  thirty  years  he  has  made  a 
record  of  which  any  surgeon  may  be  justly  proud  and  times  without 


276  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

number  he  has  demonstrated  his  great  skill  as  a  physician  and  surgeon 
and  the  work  that  he  has  done  during  his  career  in  the  Wabash  Hospital 
could  not  be  told  in  any  mere  biography. 

Doctor  Clapp's  life  is  a  busy  one  and  in  addition  to  his  work  in  the 
Wabash  Hospital  he  built  Woodland  Hospital,  which  he  also  conducts. 
He  bought  the  property  where  this  hospital  stands  in  1909  and  used  a  ' 
portion  of  the  building  which  stood  thereon  as  a  part  of  the  splendid 
modern  hospital  which  he  erected.  Woodland  Hospital  has  a  capacity  for 
50  patients  and  is  equipped  with  all  modem  hospital  fixtures  and  con- 
veniences. The  grounds  upon  which  the  hospital  stands  has  a  frontage 
of  170  feet  and  is  400  feet  deep.  The  building  is  well  designed  and  the 
grounds  are  neat  and  well  kept  and  Woodland  Hospital  is  recognized  as 
one  of  the  beauty  spots  of  Moberly.  It  would  cost  $100,000  to  build  this 
hospital  at  the  present  time. 

In  1883  Dr.  Chambers  B.  Clapp  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss 
Laura  D.  Lockhart,  a  native  of  Danville,  111.  She  is  a  daughter  of 
John  R.  and  Mary  Lockhart,  both  natives  of  Vermillion  County,  111.  The 
father  is  now  in  his  84th  year  and  the  mother  is  77  years  of  age. 

In  addition  to  his  professional  career.  Doctor  Clapp  takes  a  keen, 
interest  in  local  affairs  of  a  public  nature  and  has  stood  ever  ready  to 
do  his  part-  for  the  betterment  and  upbuilding  of  Moberly  and  its  insti- 
tutions. He  is  president  of  the  Moberly  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  also 
president  of  the  board  of  education  and  during  the  World  War  he  served 
on  the  Medical  Advisory  Board.  He  is  a  director  in  the  Bank  of  Moberly. 
He  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  member  of  the  Shrine.  He  also 
holds  membership  in  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  .  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

William  F.  Rohloff,  superintendent  of  the  Brown  Shoe  Company,  fac- 
tory No.  6,  is  at  the  head  of  one  of  the  important  manufacturing  indus- 
tries that  is  making  of  Moberly  a  recognized  manufacturing  center.  This 
plant  has  upon  its  pay  roll  450  employees  and  is  one  of  twelve  factories 
operated  by  the  Brown  Shoe  Company  in  various  cities  of  the  middle 
west  and  has  been  in  operation  here  since  1906.  At  this  writing  the 
daily  output  of  branch  No.  6  is  about  2,700  pairs  of  shoes  and  from 
200  to  300  pairs  of  boots  daily  and  during  the  war  there  were  manufac- 
tured here  over  a  half  million  pairs  of  canvas  leggings  for  the  gov- 
ernment besides  a  vast  number  of  service  boots  and  shoes,  the  retail 
price  of  which  ranged  from  $4.50  to '$25.00  per  pair,  and  during  the 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  277 

war  the  company  employed  here  about  500  persons.  The  present  pay 
roll  is  about  $8,000  per  week. 

Mr.  Rohloff,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  is  a  practical  shoe 
man  who  has  had  a  vast  amount  of  experience  in  the  manufacture  of 
shoes  in  various  sections  of  the  country.  He  is  a  native  of  Germany 
and  is  a  son  of  Frederick  and  Augusta  (Matzdorf)  Rohloff.  The  father 
is  now  deceased  and  the  mother  resides  at  Shawano,  Wis.  W.  F.  Rohloff 
received  a  good  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Wisconsin  and  after- 
wards took  a  course  in  law  at  the  La  Salle  Institute  of  Chicago.  He 
began  his  career  in  shoe  manufacturing  when  he  was  17  years  old  in 
the  employ  of  the  Shawano  Boot  and  Shoe  Company  at  Shawano,  Wis. 
From  there  he  went  to  La  Crosse,  Wis.,  and  was  employed  by  the  LaCrosse 
Boot  and  Shoe  Company  for  a  number  of  years  and  worked  in  every 
department  of  that  factory.  He  then  went  to  Milwaukee  where  he  had 
charge  of  a  shoe  factory  for  a  time  and  then  to  Chicago  and  took  charge 
of  the  Pheonix  Boot  and  Shoe  Company  at  West  Pullman.  Ftom  there 
he  went  to  Kansas  City  with  the  Barton  Brothers  Shoe  Company.  In 
1909  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Brown  Shoe  Company  and  for  11 
years  has  been  in  the  employ  of  this  company  as  foreman  of  various 
factories  and  superintendent,  having  held  a  position  of  superintendent 
of  the  Moberly  factory  No,  6  for  the  past  three  years.  In  addition  to 
knowing  the  art  of  manufacturing  shoes  and  all  the  intricacies  of  this 
business,  Mr.  Rohloff  is  a  capable  executive  and  not  only  knows  shoes, 
but  has  a  keen  insight  into  human  nature  and  understands  men. 

Mr.  Rohloff  was  married  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  in  March,  1901,  to 
Miss  Margaret  Hollingsworth.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

Dr.  E.  R.  Hickerson,  a  prominent  physician  and  surgeon  of  Moberly, 
has  been  successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  Moberly 
and  Randolph  County  for  the  past  35  years.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri 
and  was  born  in  Ralls  County  Jan.  27,  1862.  He  is  the  son  of  Dr.  J.  C. 
and  Darthula  (Rodes)  Hickerson,  the  former  a  native  of  Virginia  and 
the  latter  from  Tennessee. 

Dr.  J.  C.  Hickerson  was  a  pioneer  physician  of  Moberly  and  was 
not  only  a  successful  physician,  but  he  was  prominent  in  the  affairs  of 
the  county  during  the  course  of  his  active  career.  He  came  here  with 
his  family  from  Ralls  County  in  1870  and  was  engaged  in  the  practice 
of  his  profession  until  the  time  of  his  death,  April  5,  1885.     He  was 


278  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

one  of  the  first  physicians  to  locate  in  Moberly.  His  wife  died  August 
17,  1901,  and  their  remains  are  buried  in  Oakland  cemetery.  They  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Dr.  E.  R.,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  A.  S.,  who  resides  in  St.  Louis;  Dr.  J.  C,  of  Independence,  Mo., 
and  W.  T.,  traffic  manager  for  the  Morris  Packing  Company,  Cl^icago,  111. 

Dr.  E.  R.  Hickerson  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  pub- 
lic schools  and  then  entered  Westminister  College  at  Fulton,  Mo.  He 
then  attended  St.  Louis  Medical  College,  where  he  was  graduated  with 
the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  in  1885.  After  receiving  his  degree 
from  that  institution  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  at  Moberly. 
He  was  graduated  from  Medical  College  the  game  year  that  his  father 
died  and  thus  was  practically  enabled  to  take  up  the  work  where  his 
father  left  off.  Doctor  Hickerson  has  been  continuously  engaged  in  the 
practice  here  since  1885. 

January  27,  1887,  Doctor  Hickerson  was  united  in  marriage  with 
Miss  Minnie  Hannah,  of  Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  John  F.  Hannah, 
a  Randolph  County  pioneer,  who  lived  about  two  miles  north  of  Moberly. 
He  was  prominent  in  local  affairs  during  his  time  and  served  for  two 
terms  as  presiding  judge  of  the  county  court.  He  died  in  1894  and  his 
wife,  who  was  a  native  of  New  York,  died  in  1906.  Their  remains  are 
interred  in  Oakland  cemetery.  To  Dr.  E.  R.  Hickerson  and  wife  have 
been  born  the  following  children:  Mrs.  A.  H.  McDonald  of  Moberly; 
Emilie,  a  teacher  of  Latin  in  the  Moberly  High  School,  and  Lieut.  J.  C. 

Lieut.  J.  C.  Hickerson  is  now  a  salesman  for  Swift  and  Company. 
After  the  United  States  entered  the  World  War,  he  enlisted  in  the  army 
in  May,  1917,  and  attended  the  military  training  school  at  Fort  Riley, 
Kan.,  and  after  he  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  he  was  assigned 
to  Battery  D,  3rd  Regiment,  at  Camp  Taylor,  Ky.  He  was  kept  at  Camp 
Taylor  and  transferred  to  the  personnel  department.  He  made  two  trips 
to  France  during  the  war  as  transport  adjutant.  After  two  years  of 
service  in  the  army  he  was  honorably  discharged,  Sept.  16,  1919. 

Doctor  Hickerson  has  always  taken  a  keen  interest  in  the  welfare 
of  the  community  and  served  on  the  Moberly  board  of  education  from 
1900  to  1906,  and  was  president  of  that  body  from  1904  to  1906. 

S.  C.  Stevenson,  senior  member  of  the  firm  which  compose  the  S.  C. 
Stevenson  Monument  Works  of  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  enterprising  and 
progressive  business  men  of  Randolph  County.  Mr.  Stevenson  is  a  na- 
tive of  Missouri.  He  was  bom  in  Shelby  County,  December  30,  1868,  and 
is  a  son  of  Samuel  J.  and  Emily  C.  (Calvert)  Stevenson. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  ,  279 

Samuel  J.  Stevenson  was  born  in  Woodford  County,  Ky.,  July  20, 
1826.  He  was  the  son  of  William  Stevenson  and  his  mother's  maiden 
name  was  Gardner.  William  Stevenson  and  his  wife  were  both  natives 
of  Kentucky.  Samuel  J.  Stevenson  came  to  Marion  County  with  his 
parents  in  1830.  He  was  about  four  years  old  when  the  family  settled 
in  Marion  County  and  was  there  reared  to  manhood.  In  1850  he  crossed 
the  plains  to  California  and  after  remaining  there  about  two  years,  he 
returned  to  Marion  County,  Mo.,  where  he  remained  until  1867,  when 
he  removed  to  Shelby  County  and  was  engaged  in  farming  there  until 
1880  when  he  retired  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  days  in  Shelbina. 
He  died  in  1904.  His  wife,  Emily  C.  Calvert,  was  born  in  Marion  County, 
Mo.,  in  1838,  and  died  in  1911.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Ziba  Calvert, 
whose  wife  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Ferguson  and 'they  were  natives  of 
Virginia. 

S.  C.  Stevenson  is  the  fifth  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  eight 
children  bom  to  his  parents.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and 
learned  the  marble  and  granite  cutter's  trade  at  Shelbina,  Mo.,  and 
for  six  years  was  engaged  in.  that  business  at  Shelbina.  In  1895  Mr. 
Stevenson  came  to  Moberly  and  succeeded  the  English  Brothers  and  con- 
ducted the  business  alone  until  1912.  His  son  Paul  then  became  a  part- 
ner in  the  business,  which  has  since  been  conducted  under  the  firm 
name  of  S.  C.  Stevenson  Monument  Works.  Their  place  of  business  is 
located  at  514  Reed  street,  and  they  employ  three  men  to  assist  in  the 
work.  They  do  an  extensive  business,  and  have  a  well  equipped  plant. 
Their  display  room  is  23x70  feet,  and  granite  which  is  the  product  of  the 
best  quarries  throughout  the  United  States  is  here  displayed. 

S.  C.  Stevenson  was  married  to  Miss  Irene  Martin,  of  Shelby  County. 
She  was  bom  Dec.  19,  1870,  and  is  a  daughter  of  W.  P.  and  Martha 
(McClintic)  Martin.  One  child  has  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Steven- 
son, Paul,  who  was  born  at  Shelbina,  Mo.,  Jan.  19,  1894.  He  was  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools  and  graduated  from  the  Moberly  High  School 
in  the  class  of  1912,  and  since  that  time  has  been  engaged  in  the  monu- 
ment business  with  his  father,  with  whom  he  learned  the  trade.  He 
was  married  in  1915  to  Miss  Florence  Wight,  a  daughter  of  J.  W.  Wight, 
a  prominent  attorney  of  Moberly,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this 
volume. 

Paul  Stevenson  is  secretary-treasurer  of  the  Missouri  Retail  Monu- 
ment Association,  of  which  he  was  a  ctiarter  member,  he  was  elected 
secretary-treasurer  in  1917.    This  association  now  has  75  members. 


280  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

S.  C.  Stevenson  is  a  member  of  the.Moberly  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  holds  membership  in  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and 
Paul  Stevenson  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons. 

William  Fennel,  Sr.,  now  living  retired  at  Moberly,  has  been  a  well- 
known  resident  and  prominent  business  man  of  Randolph  County  for 
nearly  half  a  century,  has  given  up  the  actual  management  of  his  financia 
affairs  and  is  able  to  enjoy  the  comfortable  fortune  which  he  has  accu- 
mulated by  hard  work  and  business  ability. 

William  Fennel  was  born  in  the  Province  of  Hessia,  Germany,  Sept. 
5,  1849,  the  son  of  Conrad  and  Anna  (Koch)  Fennel,  and  was  the  young- 
est of  eight  children  born  to  them.  The  parents  spent  their  lives  in  the 
old  country.  William  Fennel  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm,  received 
excellent  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  land.  He  immi- 
grated to  the  United  States  and  came  west  to  St.  Louis.  He  at  once 
began  to  work  as  an  apprentice  at  the  blacksmith's  trade,  completed  the 
years  of  his  service  and  remained  there  five  years  before  coming  to 
Moberly,  in  the  spring  of  1872.  Here  he  became  associated  with  his 
brother,  Warner,  in  manufacturing  wagons  and  soon  became  an  expert 
in  that  business. 

In  1875,  Mr.  Fennel  purchased  his  brother's  interest  in  the  plant, 
who  went  to  Oregon,  where  he  still  resides.  Mr.  Fennel  assumed  the  sole 
management  of  the  shop,  and  his  reputation  as  a  careful  skilled  work- 
man grew  and  his  trade  increased.  For  nearly  a  half  century  he  was 
engaged  in  the  same  business.  In  1886,  Mr.  Fennel  located  at  the  site, 
where  he  still  lives,  then  purchased  the  property  at  the  corner  of  Coates 
and  Clark  streets,  where  he  erected  a  modern  factory  which,  became 
one  of  the  landmarks  of  the  town  and  where  William  Fennel,  Jr.,  now 
conducts  the  Fennel  Carriage  and  Automobile  Works,  which  is  one  of 
the  largest  concerns  of  its  kind  in  central  Missouri.  All  repair  work  is 
done,  as  well  as  manufacturing  of  carriages,  wagons  and  automobile  parts 
and  painting. 

In  the  spring  of  1919,  Mr.  Fennel  retired  from  commercial  activities, 
though  not  from  life,  as  so  many  men  do.  He  still  takes  an  interested  and 
an  active  part  in  the  life  of  the  city  for  he  has  been  a  progressive  man, 
both  in  his  business,  and  civic  affairs  and  is  one  of  the  men  who  have 
helped  make  Randolph  County.  Mr.  Fennel  is  a  Republican,  and  belongs 
to  the  Lutheran  church. 


WTI,LIA.M  FENNRI. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  281 

On  Aug.  26,  1876,  Mr.  Fennel  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  A.  Adler, 
a  native  of  Fayette  County,  Mo.,  the  daughter  of  John  and  Ida  (Muller) 
Adler,  natives  of  Germany  and  Switzerland,  respectively.  Eight  chil- 
dren have  been  bom  to  this  union:  Ida,  the  wife  of  Powell  Kroggel,  of 
Moberly;  Rose,  who  married  Henry  Eienhauer,  of  Moberly;  Henry  C, 
who  operates  the  carriage  factory;  John,  also  in  the  factory;  Mary,  at 
home;  Viola,  deceased;  William,  Jr.,  in  the  Fennel  factory,  and  Vera, 
the  wife  of  L.  Acker,  of  Omaha. 

S.  W.  Creson,  president  of  the  Moberly  Wholesale  Grocery  Company, 
is  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  Moberly.  He  is  a  native  of 
Missouri  and  was  born  in  Howard  County,  Jan.  27,  1853.  He  is  a  son 
of  Thomas  H.  and  Caroline  (Collier)  Creson.  Thomas  H.  Creson  was 
bom  in  Surrey  County,  N.  C,  in  1823,  and  came  to  Missouri  with  his 
parents  when  he  was  14  years  of  age,  in  1837.  He  was  the  son  of 
George  Creson,  who  upon  coming  to  Missouri,  settled  in  the  northern 
part  of  Howard  County,  in  Burton  township,  where  he  impi'oved  a  farm 
and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  died  in  1881.  Thomas  H.  Creson, 
like  his  father,  was  also  a  tiller  of  the  soil.  He  bought  and  improved  a 
farm  in  Howard  County  and  was  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising 
throughout  his  active  career,  except  during  the  period  that  he  served  in 
the  Civil  War.  During  the  course  of  that  conflict  he  enlisted  in  the 
Confederate  army,  under  the  standard  of  Gen.  Sterling  Price,  and  was 
with  Price's  command  at  Baton  Rouge,  La.,  when  the  war  closed.  He 
then  returned  to  St.  Louis  by  steamboat  and  to  Howard  County,  where 
he  resumed  the  peaceful  pursuit  of  farming  until  the  time  of  his  death, 
in  1885.  His  wife,  Caroline  (Collier)  Creson,  was  born  in  St.  Clair 
County,  111.,  in  1828,  and  died  Oct.  17,  1859.  They  were  the  parents  of 
the  following  children:  Mary  L.,  Higbee,  Mo.;  S.  W.,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch ;  James  M.,  Higbee,  Mo. ;  Eunice  A.,  deceased ;  Mrs.  Josephine 
Bartee,  deceased,  and  Rebecca  L.,  deceased. 

S.  W.  Creson  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Howard  County  and 
attended  the  public  schools  and  in  1875-76  attended  the  States  Normal 
School  at  Kjrksville.  In  early  life  he  was  engaged  in  teaching  and  for 
nine  years  taught  school  in  Howard  and  Randolph  counties  and  was  one 
of  the  successful  teachers  of  this  time.  He  was  also  engaged  in  farm- 
ing in  Howa^?d  County  while  he  was  teaching.  He  then  engaged  as  clerk 
in  the  Grange  Store  .at  Yates,  Mo.,  and  after  clerking  there  for  three 
years  he  purchased  that  business  and  successfully  conducted  a  general 


282  HISTOEY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

mercantile  grocery  business  at  Moberly,  as  is  set  forth  elsewhere  in  this 
volume. 

May  27,  1877,  S.  W.  Creson  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Susan 
E.  Robb,  of  Howard  County,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Samuel  and 
Sarah  E.  (Lesley)  Robb.  Samuel  Robb  and  his  wife  were  pioneer  set- 
tlers of  Howard  County.  He  died  March  10,  1876,  at  the  age  of  45  years 
and  his  wife  lived  to  the  advanced  age  of  84  years  and  died  in  March, 
1919.  His  remains  are  buried  in  the  cemetery  at  Log  Chapel  in  Howard 
County,  and  she  is  buried  in  the  Sharon  church  cemetery  in  Howard 
County.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Creson  have  been  born  one  daughter, 
Bertha  A.,  who  married  R.  M.  Allen,  secretary  of  the  Moberly  Wholesale 
Grocery  Company,  a  sketch  of  whom  apepars  in  this  volume. 

Mr.  Creson  has  not  only  been  successful  and  active  in  a  business 
way,  but  during  the  course  of  his  career  he  has  always  given  public 
affairs  thoughtful  consideration  and  a  good  citizen's  attention.  He  has 
served  two  terms  in  the  State  Legislature,  including  the  session  of  1901 
and  1903,  and  never  missed  a  roll  call.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic 
Lodge. 

Mr.  Creson  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Yates  Savings  Bank, 
Yates,  Mo.,  and  was  president  of  that  bank  until  1913,  when  he  sold 
his  interests.  He  is  the  owner  of  340  acres  of  valuable  land  just  north 
of  Yates,  Mo. 

Moberly  Wholesale  Grocery  Company  is  one  of  the  important  com- 
mercial institutions  of  the  city  of  Moberly.  This  company  is  composed 
of  S.  W.  Creson,  R.  M.  Allen  and  T.  M.  Bartee.  Mr.  Creson  is  president 
of  the  company;  Mr.  Allen,  the  manager,  and  Mr.  Bartee,  treasurer.  The 
business  is  the  outgrowth  of  the  general  mercantile  business  which  was 
conducted  by  Creson  and  Allen  at  Yate,  Mo.,  from  1899  to  1912.  Prior 
to  that  time  Mr.  Creson  had  conducted  a  store  at  Yates  since  1884.  The 
wholesale  grocery  business  was  started  at  Moberly  in  1912  and  since 
that  time  the  volume  of  business  has  gradually  increased  from  year  to 
year  and  in  1919  the  business  of  this  concern  amounted  to  about  three- 
fourths  of  a  million  dollars. 

The  business  of  the  jyioberly  Wholesale  Grocery  Company  extends 
over  a  radius  of  75  miles  from  Moberly  and  the  trade  is  looked  after  by 
four  travehng  salesmen.  The  business  is  located  on  the  corner  of  Coates 
and  Clark  streets,  Moberly,  and  occupies  a  building  which  has  a  frontage 
of  120  feet  on  Coates  street  and  130  feet  on  Clark  street,  and  occupies  two 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  283 

floors.  This  is  one  of  the  business  enterprises  of  which  Moberly  is  justly 
proud  and  which  adds  no  small  amount  of  prestage  to  Moberly  as  a  whole- 
sale center. 

R.  M.  Allen,  manager  of  the  Moberly  Wholesale  Grocery  Company, 
is  a  native  of  Illinois.  He  was  born  in  Opdyke,  Jefferson  County,  and 
is  the  son  of  Joshua  P.  and  Alice  M.  (Jones)  Allen.  The  father  was  a 
native  of  Illinois  and  died  March  24,  1911.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion. The  mother  now  resides  in  Muskogee,  Okla.  They  were  the  par- 
ents of  the  following  children:  R.  M.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Mrs. 
Delila  Littlepage,  Sillsbee,  Texas;  Jonathan  P.  Seminole,  Okla.;  Mrs.  Eva 
E.  Jones,  Muskogee,  Okla.;  E.  J.,  Muskogee,  Okla.,  and  Nettie,  married 
W.  G.  Wilkinson,  who  is  now  a  government  auditor  in  the  service  at 
Fort  Niagara,  N.  Y. 

R.  M.  Allen  attended  the  public  schools  in  Illinois  and  after  coming 
to  Missouri  took  a  course  in  the  Robinson  Business  College,  at  Sedalia, 
Mo.,  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  1895.  He  then  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad  Company  as  telegrapher  at 
Higginsville,  Mo.  He  served  in  that  capacity  until  1899.  ■  He  then  joined 
Mf.  Creson  in  the  general  mercantile  business  at  Yates,  Mo.,  and  later 
in  1912  they  abandoned  the  retail  business  and  engaged  in  the  whole- 
sale grocery  business  at  Moberly,  a  more  complete  history  of  which  is 
given  elsewhere  in  this  volume. 

Mr.  Allen  was  married  May  17,  1899,  to  Miss  Bertha  A.  Creson,  of 
Yates,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  S.  W.  and  Susan  E.  (Robb)  Creson. 
A  sketch  of  S.  W.  Creson  appears  in  this  volume.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Allen 
reside  at  419  South  Fourth  street,  Moberly. 

Melvin  N.  Marshall,  chief  of  police  of  the  city  of  Moberly,  has  been 
a  member  of  the  police  force  of  Moberly  for  the  past  ten  years  and 
since  1917  has  been  chief  of  police.  He  is  a  fearless  officer  with  a  splen- 
did record  to  his  credit.  Chief  Marshall  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County 
and  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  families  of  Missouri. 
He  was  born  in  Prairie  township,  Randolph  County,  March  30,  1877,  ana 
is  a  son  of  Rice  and  Kate  (Harris)  Marshall. 

Rice  Marshall  was  born  in  Monroe  County,  Mo.,  in  1840.  He  was 
a  farmer  and  blacksmith  and  for  a  number  of  years  conducted  a  black- 
smith shop  at  Renick,  Mo.  He  was  a  Civil  War  veteran,  having  served  in 
the  Conferedate  army  under  Gen.  Sterling  Price  about  three  years  and 
was  with  his  command  in  Louisiana  when  the  war  closed.     He  died  in 


284  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

1895  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  the  Anderson  cemetery  in  Prairie 
township.  Rice  Marshall  was  a  son  of  Wiley  Marshall,  a  Virginian  who 
came  to  Missouri  at  a  very  early  date  and  settled  in  Monroe  County. 
He  spent  his  latter  years  in  Randolph  County  with  his  son  and  died  in 
Prairie  township,  where  his  remains  are  buried.  Kate  (Harris)  Marshall, 
mother  of  Melvin  N.  Marshall,  was  born  at  Renick,  Randolph  County,  in 
1850,  and  now  resides  on  South  Williams  street,  Moberly.  She  is  also' 
a  descendant  of  a  pioneer  family  of  Randolph  County.  To  Rice  and 
Kate  (Harris)  Marshall  were  born  the  following  children:  Wiley,  who 
occupies  the  old  home  place  in  Prairie  township;  Claude,  principal  of 
West  Park  school,  Moberly;  Etha,  married  Henry  Owens,  Huntsville; 
Melvin  N;,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  and  Fannie,  married  E.  Noel,  of 
Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 

Melvin  N.  Marshall  was  reared  on  the  home  place  of  Randolph  County 
and  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  the  county  and 
attended  the  Moberly  High  School  for  three  years.  He  then  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  and  in  1910  was  appointed  a 
member  of  the  Moberly  police  force  and  in  1917  was  elected  chief  of 
police,  and  has  since  capably  served  in  that  capacity. 

Mr.  Marshall  was  married  in  1903  to  Miss  Anna  McGinnis,  of 
Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Patrick  and  Martha  (Haley)  McGinnis. 
Mrs.  McGinnis  died  in  1915  and  her  remains  are  buried  in  Oakland  ceme- 
tery and  Mr.  McGinnis  now  resides  in  Moberly. 

Chief  Marshall  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows, Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security  and 
the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  capable  and  effi- 
cient officer  and  a  citizen  of  Moberly  and  Randolph  County  of  high 
standing. 

A.  B.  Rubey,  assistant  manager  for  the  J.  S.  Bowers  &  Son  Dry 
Goods  and  Clothing  Company,  has  for  many  years  been  identified  with 
the  mercantile  interest  of  Moberly  and  has  had  a  life  long  experience 
in  the  mercantile  world.  He  is  a  native  of  Ohio  and  a  son  of  Dr.  James 
and  Hannah  (Hamilton)  Rubey,  who  moved  from  Ohio  to  Union  City, 
Ind.,  when  A.  B.  Rubey  was  a  boy.  His  father  was  a  physician  and 
died  at  the  age  of  64  years. 

A.  B.  Rubey  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Union  City,  Ind., 
and  attended  the  high  school  there.  He  began  his  career  as  clerk  at  an 
early  age,  clerking  at  Union  City  from  1879  to  1886.     He  then  came  to 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  285 

Moberiy  and  began  clerking  in  the  store  of  J.  S.  Bowers.  In  fact,  he 
had  clerked  for  Mr.  Bowers  in  Indiana.  Since  coming  to  Moberiy,  he  has 
been  in  the  employ  of  J.  S.  Bowers  and  Son. 

Mr.  Rubey  was  married  in  1890  to  Miss  Alva  Walden,  of  Moberiy. 
She  is  a  daughter  of  Z.  and  Elizabeth  (Frazier)  Walden.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Rubey  have  been  born  one  son,  William  W.,  who  is  a  graduate  of 
the  Missouri  University  at  Columbia  with  the  degree  of  A.  B.  He  is 
a  graduate  of  the  Moberiy  High  School.  During  the  World  War,  he  en- 
listed in  the  Aviation  Corps  of  the  United  States  army  at  St.  Louis  and 
was  at  home  under  orders  waiting  a  call  to  the  service  when  the  armistice 
was  signed. 

Mr.  Rubey  is  one  of  the  public  spirited  citizens  of  Moberiy  and  for 
the  past  25  years  he  has  been  one  of  the  prime  movers  in  promoting  the 
public  library  of  this  city  and  is  now  the  president  of  the  library  board. 
He  was  a  member  of  that  board  when  the  library  building  was  erected 
and  has  always  been  an  untiring  worker  in  behalf  of  the  public  library. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Modern  Woodmen 
of  America,  the  National  Union  and  is  one  of  the  progressive  citizens  of 
Moberiy.    Mr.  Rubey  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge. 

William  D.  Scampton,  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Milbank-Scamp- 
ton  Milling  Company,  is  at  the  head  of  one  of  Moberly's  important  in- 
dustrial concerns.  This  company  has  been  doing  business  here  for  over 
20  years,  and  from  1899  until  1904  it  was  conducted  by  Milbank  and 
Scampton  as  a  partnershihp  and  in  1904  was  incorporated.  The  plant 
is  located  at  318  North  Clark  street,  the  site  having  been  purchased 
from  F.  D.  Crow.  The  mill  building  is  40x60  feet  with  an  engine  room 
30x40.  The  building  has  two  stories  and  a  basement  and  there  is  alsp 
a  large  warehouse,  50x50  feet,  adjoining.  The  daily  capacity  is  about 
100  barrels  of  flour  and  200  barrels  of  meal  and  is  operated  on  a  mer- 
chant milling  basis,  scarcely  any  custom  grinding  being  done. 

William  D.  Scampton  was  bom  in  Madison,  Wis.,  in  Dec.  12,  1863, 
and  is  a  son  of  D.  J.  and  Anna  E.  (Hart)  Scampton.  The  father  died 
in  Madison,  Wis.,  at  the  age  of  63  years,  after  having  spent  his  life 
in  that  state.  He  served  in  the  Union  army  during  the  Civil  War,  hav- 
ing enlisted  at  Madison  in  Company  E.,  47th  Regiment,  Wisconsin  Volun- 
teer Infantry.  Upon  the  organization  of  his  company  he  was  first  lieu- 
tenant and  during  the  course  of  his  military  career  was  promoted  to  cap- 
tain and  was  serving  in  that  capacity  when  the  war  closed.  He  served 
about  three  years. 


286  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

William  D.  Scampton  was  reared  in  Madison,  Wis.,  and  after  receiv- 
ing a  good  preliminary  education  in  the  public  schools,  he  attended  the 
University  of  Wisconsin  at  Madison  for  two  years.  Shortly  after  leaving 
the  university  he  engaged  in  railroading,  entering  the  employ  of  the 
Chicago,  Milwaukee  and  St.  Paul  Railroad,  and  was  thus  employed  until 
1898.  During  the  last  ten  years  of  his  railroad  experience  he  was  a 
locomotive  engineer.  In  1899,  he  engaged  in  the  milling  business  at 
Moberly  in  partnership  with  George  Milbank  and  this  partnership  con- 
tinued until  the  death  of  Mr.  Milbank  in  1904,  when  the  business  was 
incorporated  and  since  when  has  been  operated  as  an  incorporated  com- 
pany. 

Mr  Scampton  was  married  Sept.  17,  1896,  to  Miss  Lucy  Milbank,  of 
Chillicothe,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  George  and  Nellie  Milbank,  the 
former  a  native  of  Essex,  England,  and  the  latter  of  Virginia.  George 
Milbank  was  the  partner  of  Mr.  Scampton  in  the  milling  business  until 
the  time  of  his  death.  To  George  and  Nellie  Milbank  were  born  the  fol- 
lowing children:  J.  T.,  Chillicothe;  C.  R.,  Kirksville;  H.  H.,  Wichita,, 
Kan.;  Mrs.  W.  E.  Ci^eUin,  Kansas  City,  Mo.;  Mrs.  T.  F.  Fulkerson,  Kan- 
sas City,  Mo.,  and  Mrs.  William  D.  Scampton,  of  this  review. 

Mr.  Scampton  is  a  member  of  the  Moberly  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
the  T.  P.  A.,  and  he  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason.  He  is  one  of  the  suc- 
cessful business  men  of  Moberly  who  has  made  substantial  progress  in 
the  business  world. 

Frank  Q.  McAfee. — The  McAfee  Mill  and  Commission  Company  of 
Moberly  of  Avhich  Frank  C.  McAfee  is  owner  and  proprietor,  began  busi- 
ness in  this  city  in  1896  and  has  been  at  its  present  location,  the  comer 
of  Clark  and  Rollins  streets  since  1908.  There  are  ten  men  employed 
in  connection  with  this  business  which  consists  of  dealing  in  grain  and 
grinding  wheat,  corn  and  feed  cereals  and  also  the  manufacture  of  patent 
stock  foods.  The  mill  has  a  capacity  of  about  25  barrels  of  flour  and  100 
barrels  of  peal  daily.  Besides  the  grinding  and  manufacturing  a  gen- 
eral wholesale  business  is  also  carried  on  in  flour,  feed,  hay  and  grain. 

Frank  C.  McAfee,  proprietor  of  the  McAfee  Mill  and  Commission 
Company,  was  bom  in  Lafayette  County,  April  11,  1875.  He  is  the  son 
of  George  L.  and  Julia  A.  (Smith)  McAfee,  both  of  whom  are  now  de- 
ceased. George  L.  McAfee  was  born  in  Mercer  County,  Ky.,  in  1852 
and  came  to  Missouri  in  1872,  locating  near  Holliday,  Monroe  County. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  287 

There  he  was  married  to  Julia  A.  Smith  and  moved  to  Lafayette  County 
when  he  returned  to  Monroe  County  where  he  died  and  is  buried  at 
Paris.  After  his  death  his  wife  married  Thomas  E.  Crow  of  Monroe 
County  and  later  came  to  Moberly  where  she  died  in  1917  and  her  remains 
are  buried  in  Oakland  Cemetery.  The  children  born  to  her  second  mar- 
riage are  William  B.  and  Thomas  E.  junior  both  of  whom  are  connected 
with  the  McAfee  Mill  and  Commission  Company;  Nellie  E.  married  Ray 
Coons  of  Houston,  Texas  and  Isabell  married  Roy  Prather  of  Kansas 
City,  who  is  with  the  Fidelity  Trust  Company  of  Kansas  City. 

Frank  C.  McAfee  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  the  Moberly 
High  School  and  in  1896  organized  the  McAfee  Mill  and  Commission  Com- 
pany and  has  conducted  that  business  till  the  present  time.  This  busij 
ness  has  expanded  under  his  management  until  there  are  now  eight 
branches  of  the  business  located  in  various  sections  of  the  state.  One 
at  Brunswick  has  an  elevator  capacity  of  30,000  bushels.  Their  elevator 
at  Huntsville,  which  was  completed  in  the  fall  of  1919,  is  strictly  modern 
and  one  of  the  best  in  the  country,  has  a  capacity  of  10,000  bushels.  The 
Randolph  Milling  Company,  a  corporation  owned  by  the  McAfee  family 
has  a  daily  capacity  of  50  barrels  of  flour.  The  Holliday  elevator  was 
completed  in  1919  and  has  a  capacity  of  6,000  bushels.  Frank  C.  McAfee's 
father,  George  L.  McAfee,  began  farming  in  Monroe  County  years  ago, 
within  a  100  yards  of  where  this  elevator  now  stands.  The  City  Feed 
Store  of  Paris,  Mo.,  is  a  branch  of  the  McAfee  business  and  they  also  have 
a  store  at  Madison,  Mo.  and  one  at  Jacksonville.  F.  C.  McAfee  also  con- 
ducts an  automobile  sales  agency  at  112  Rollins  street,  Moberly  and 
handles  the  Studebaker,  Cadillac  and  Brisco  automobiles  and  also  trucks 
and  tractors.  This  business  was  started  in  1917  and  in  1919,  63  cars 
were  sold.  Mr.  McAfee  also  owns  valuable  real  estate  interests  in 
Moberly  and  vicinity. 

Mr.  McAfee  was  maried  April  21,  1898  to  Miss  Letha  G.  Smothers, 
of  Randolph  County,  a  daughter  of  Daniel  Smothers  who  is  now  deceased 
and  his  widow  resides  in  Moberly.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McAfee  have  been 
born  two  children:  Louise  and  Gertrude  who  reside  at  home  with  their 
parents. 

Mr.  McAfee  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Central  Christian 
church. 


HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY  289 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  C.  O'Keefe  have  been  born  the  following 
children:  Mary  Margaret,  a  student  of  Marymount  College;  John  C, 
Jr.,  a  student  in  Georgetown  University;  Helen,  a  student  in  Loretta 
College,  St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Frank  and  Arthur,  at  home. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  takes  an  active  interest  in  local  progressive  movement 
for  the  improvement  and  upbuilding  of  Moberly  and  was  one  of  the 
leading  factors  in  the  organization  of  the  Moberly  Commercial  Club, 
which  later  developed  into  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  While  he  has 
been  interested  and  active  in  local  affairs  of  a  public  nature,  he  has  per- 
sistently refused  to  become  a  candidate  for-  city  office  of  any  kind,  al- 
though frequently  urged  to  do  so.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights  of  Columbus*  the  Country 
Club,  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

William  P.  O'Keefe,  of  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  Wholesale  Grocery  Com- 
pany of  Moberly,  Mo.  was  bom  in  Susquehanna  County,  Pa.,  Dec.  27,  1865 
and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret  (O'Connell)  O'Keefe,  early  settlers 
of  Randolph  County  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased.  A  more  extensive 
history  of  the  O'Keefe  family  appears  in  connection  with  the  sketches  of 
Arthur  O'Keefe  and  John  C.  O'Keefe  in  this  volume. 

William  P.  O'Keefe  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his  parents  when 
he  was  a  child  and  attended  the  public  schools  in  the  vicinity  of  Renick 
where  the  family  first  settled,  and  later  in  Moberly.  He  also  took  a  com- 
mercial course  in  S.  M.  Crawford's  Business  College  at  Moberly.  He 
then  learned  the  blacksmith  trade  in  the  Wabash  railroad  shops  and  in 
1892  became  identified  with  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  Grocery  Company  and 
since  that  time  has  been  actively  associated  with  that  company. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  was  married  in  1901  to  Miss  Eliza  McKinna  of  St.  Louis, 
Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  John  and  Catherine  McKinna,  the  former  of 
whom  is  now  deceased  and  the  latter  resides  in  St.  Louis.  The  McKinnas 
belong  to  some  of  the  pioneer  families  of  that  city.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
O'Keefe  have  been  bom  four  children  as  follows:  Catherine,  William, 
Mary  and  Eleapor. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  is  a  Democrat  and  takes  a  keen  interest  and  an  active 
part  in  political  matters.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus 
and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  Moberly's 
substantial  and  enterprising  business  men.  The  O'Keefe  home  is  located 
at  615  S.  Fifth  street. 


288  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

John  C.  O'Keefe,  president  of  the  O'Keefe  Brothers'  Grocery  Com- 
pany, of  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  business 
men  of  l^oberly  and  Randolph  County.  He  was  born  in  Susquehanna 
County,  Pa.,  Aug.  7,  1859,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret 
(O'Connel)  O'Keefe,  early  settlers  of  Randolph  County,  who  are  now 
deceased  and  further  mention  of  whom  is  made  in  connection  with  the 
sketch  of  Arthur  O'Keefe  in  this  volume. 

John  C.  O'Keefe  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his  parents  in  1862, 
when  he  was  about  3  years  of  age.  The  family  first  settled  in  Renick 
and  here  John  C.  O'Keefe  attended  school  during  the  winter  terms  and 
worked  in  the  stores  of  Renick  in  summer.  The  first  school  which  he 
attended  was  held  in  a  primitive  log  school  house  and  he  recalled  Ben- 
jamin Ashcomb  as  being  a  first  teacher,  a  pioneer  teacher  of  Randolph 
County  who  died  a  few  years  ago  and  his  widow  now  lives  at  Hunts- 
ville. 

The  O'Keefe  family  moved  to  Moberly  in  1872,  where  the  father 
engaged  in  railroad  work.  Here  Arthur  O'Keefe  engaged  in  retail  gro- 
cery business  in  1879  and  was  joined  by  John  C.  later.  The  business 
at  first  was  conducted  as  a  retail  grocery,  but  later  developed  into  a 
wholesale  grocery  house.  John  C.  was  Secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
company  for  a  time  and  afterwards  became  president  and  has  occupied 
that  position  to  the  present  time.  The  O'Keefe  Brothers  Grocery  Com- 
pany does  an  extensive  business  in  this  section  of  the  state,  their  busi- 
ness extending  over  eight  counties,  north  of  the  Missouri  River,  in  which 
they  are  represented  by  six  traveling  salesmen.  In  1919  their  business 
exceeded  $800,000. 

John  C.  O'Keefe  was  married  June  16,  1897,  to  Miss  Margaret  G. 
Haggerty,  a  daughter  of  Frank  and  Mary  (Cunningham)  Haggerty,  of 
Moberly.  Frank  Haggerty  was  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Moberly  and 
one  of  the  pioneer  merchants  of  this  city.  He  was  bom  in  Ireland  in 
1849  and  came  to  America  about  1867,  first  locating  at  Memphis,  Tenn. 
In  1872,  he  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  the  grocery  business.  He 
was  successful  in  business,  public  spirited  and  had  much  to  do  with  the 
development  and  upbuilding  of  Moberly.  He  built  the  Haggerty  Opera 
House  which  was  the  only  opera  house  in  Moberly  for  many  years.  It  is 
now  known  as  the  Lyric  Hall.  Mr.  Haggerty  was  engaged  in  business 
here  until  about  1910,  and  in  1914  went  to  California  and  now  resides 
in  Los  Angeles.  His  wife  died  in  1883  and  her  remains  were  buried  in 
St.  Mary's  Cemetery  Moberly. 


JOHN   C.   O'KEEFE 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  289 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  C.  O'Keefe  have  been  born  the  following 
children:  Mary  Margaret,  a  student  of  Marymount  College;  John  C, 
Jr.,  a  student  in  Georgetown  University;  Helen,  a  student  in  Loretta 
College,  St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Frank  and  Arthur,  at  home. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  takes  an  active  interest  in  local  progressive  movement 
for  the  improvement  and  upbuilding  of  Moberly  and  was  one  of  the 
leading  factors  in  the  organization  of  the  Moberly  Commercial  Club, 
which  later  developed  into  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  While  he  has 
been  interested  and  active  in  local  affairs  of  a  public  nature,  he  has  per- 
sistently refused  to  become  a  candidate  for.  city  office  of  any  kind,  al- 
though frequently  urged  to  do  so.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights  of  Columbus*  the  Country 
Club,  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

William  P.  O'Keefe,  of  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  Wholesale  Grocery  Com- 
pany of  Moberly,  Mo.  was  bom  in  Susquehanna  County,  Pa.,  Dec.  27,  1865 
and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret  (O'Connell)  O'Keefe,  early  settlers 
of  Randolph  County  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased.  A  more  extensive 
history  of  the  O'Keefe  family  appears  in  connection  with  the  sketches  of 
Arthur  O'Keefe  and  John  C.  O'Keefe  in  this  volume. 

William  P.  O'Keefe  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his  parents  when 
he  was  a  child  and  attended  the  public  schools  in  the  vicinity  of  Renick 
where  the  family  first  settled,  and  later  in  Moberly.  He  also  took  a  com- 
mercial course  in  S.  M.  Crawford's  Business  College  at  Moberly.  He 
then  learned  the  blacksmith  trade  in  the  Wabash  railroad  shops  and  in 
1892  became  identified  with  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  Grocery  Company  and 
since  ttiat  time  has  been  actively  associated  with  that  company. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  was  married  in  1901  to  Miss  Eliza  McKinna  of  St.  Louis, 
Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  John  and  Catherine  McKinna,  the  former  of 
whom  is  now  deceased  and  the  latter  resides  in  St.  Louis.  The  McKinnas 
belong  to  some  of  the  pioneer  families  of  that  city.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
O'Keefe  have  been  bom  four  children  as  follows:  Catherine,  William, 
Mary  and  Eleapor. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  is  a  Democrat  and  takes  a  keen  interest  and  an  active 
part  in  political  matters.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus 
and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  Moberly's 
substantial  and  enterprising  business  men.  The  O'Keefe  home  is  located 
at  615  S.  Fifth  street. 


290  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Joseph  F.  O'Keefe,  secretary  of  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  Wholesale 
Grocery  Company,  of  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  progressive  business  men  of 
Moberly  and  Randolph  County.  He  was  born  at  Davenport,  Iowa,  in 
1864  and  is  the  son  of  William  and  Margaret  (O'Connell)  O'Keefe,  a  more 
extensive  history  of  whom  appears  elsewhere  in  this  volume. 

Joseph  F.  O'Keefe  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Randolph 
County  and  has  spent  his  life  in  the  grocery  business  in  one  capacity  or 
another.  He  began  his  experience  in  that  business  driving  a  delivery 
wagon  for  the  O'Keefe  Brothers  grocery,  back  in  the  days  when  this  firm 
conducted  a  retail  grocery  business.  He  now  divides  his  time  between 
the  office  and  outside  as  salesman. 

Mr.  O'Keefe  is  unmarried  and  resides  with  his  sisters  at  605  South 
Fifth  street,  Moberly,  Mo.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  live  business  man  and  has  an  extensive 
acquaintance  throughout  central  Missouri. 

Dr.  Charles  L.  Dodson,  a  well  known  and  successful  physician  and 
surgeon  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  a  native  of  this  state.  Doctor  Dodson  was 
born  in  Adair  County,  Mo.,  July  26,  1878,  and  is  the  son  of  Perry  M.  and 
Rose  Ann  (Stukey)  Dodson.  Perry  M.  Dodson  was  also  born  in  Adair 
County,  Mo.,  and  during  the  early  part  of  his  life  he  was  engaged  in 
farming  pursuits.  In  1898  he  engaged  in  the  real  estate  and  loan  busi- 
ness at  Kirksville,  Mo.  and  followed  that  vocation  until  the  time  of  his 
death  in  1917 ;  he  was  64  years  old.  His  wife  died  at  the  age  of  47  years 
and  their  remains  are  buried  at  Millard,  Mo.  They  were  the  parents  of 
two  children:  Dr.  Charles  L.,  the  subject  of  this  review,  and  Lena  Pearl 
who  married  Albert  B.  Fish,  of  Sapulpa,  Okla. 

Dr.  Charles  L.  Dodson  received  a  good  preliminary  education  in  the 
public  schools  and  then  took  a  course  in  the  State  Normal  School  at  Kirks- 
ville, Mo.,  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  1899.  He  then 
entered  the  American  School  of  Osteopathy  and  was  graduated  from  that 
institution  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Osteopathy  in  the  class  of  1901. 
Later,  Dr.  Dodson  entered  the  College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at  St. 
Louis,  Mo.,  where  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medi- 
cine. He  engaged  in  the  practice  at  Huntsville  at  first,  and  in  1905  came 
to  Moberly  which  has  since  been  the  scene  of  his  professional  activity. 
He  is  a  capable  physician  and  with  his  knowledge  of  both  the  science  of 
osteopathy  and  medicine  as  well  as  surgery  he  is  well  equipped  for  the 
wide  field  which  his  general  practice  embraces.  Since  coming  to  Moberly, 
he  has  built  up  a  large  practice  and  stands  high  in  the  community. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  291 

Dr.  Dodson  was  married  Dec.  15,  1901,  to  Miss  Cordelia  Beall.  She 
is  a  daughter  of  Lee  J.  and  Hannah  (Armstrong)  Beall.  Lee  J.  Beall 
was  a  native  of  Ohio  and  served  in  the  Union  Army  during  the  Civil  War. 
He  and  his  wife  are  both  deceased.  To  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Dodson  have  been 
born  one  child,  Mary,  who  is  now  a  student  in  the  Moberly  High  School.' 

Dr.  Dodson  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons. 

T.  R.  Fiorlta,  of  Moberly,  has  had  a  successful  business  career  and  is 
an  example  of  what  can  be  accomplished  by  thrift  and  industry,  coupled 
with  the  determination  to  succeed.  He  is  a  native  of  the  Island  of  Sicily 
and  was  bom  July  24,  1877.  He  is  the  son  of  Charles  Fiorita  who  lived 
for  a  time  at  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  and  was  engaged  in  the  wholesale  fruit 
business.  He  lived  in  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  where  he  died  in  1916  and  his 
widow  resides  in  that  city. 

T.  R.  Fiorita  came  to  America  with  his  parents  who  first  located  at 
Des  Moines,  Iowa.  He  came  to  Moberly  in  June,  1899  and  at  that  time, 
just  21  years  ago,  his  entire  capital  consisted  of  $71.00  He  first  engaged 
in  the  fruit  business  and  a  short  time  afterwards  added  candies  and  ice 
cream  to  his  business,  making  his  own  candy  and  ice  cream.  About  ten 
years  later  he  bought  a  saloon  which  he  conducted  until  July  1,  1919. 
During  the  course  of  his  business  career  Mr.  Fiorita  worked  hard  and 
saved  his  money  which  he  invested  carefully.  He  became  prosperous 
and  today  is  an  extensive  land  owner,  besides  the  owner  of  valuable 
property  in  the  city  of  Moberly,  including  his  residence  and  a  business 
block  at  118  Reed  street.  He  is  the  owner  of  about  1,20€  acres  of  land, 
685  acres  at  Clapper,  252  in  Audrain  County,  near  Mexico,  and  240  acres 
near  Higbee,  Randolph  County.  He  leases  two  of  his  farms  and  has  a 
tenant  on  the  other  685  acre  place  which  he  operates  under  his  own 
supervision.  This  place  is  well  stocked  and  he  is  extensively  engaged 
in  breeding  registered  Duroc  Jersey  hogs  and  registered  Jersey  cattle 
and  also  conducts  a  dairy  there. 

Mr.  Fiorita  was  united  in  marriage  at  Atlantic,  Iowa,  to  Miss  Ida  M. 
Sanford,  a  native  of  that  place.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fiorita  have  been  born 
two  children:  Nina,  a  student  in  Linwood  College  at  St.  Charles,  Mo.,  and 
Charles,  who  is  at  home  with  his  parents. 

Mr.  Fiorita  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Columbus. 

Dr,  Stephen  T.  Ragan,  a  prominent  physician,  who  is  successfully 
engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  a  native  of 


292  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

this  state,  and  is  a  member'  of  a  pioneer  Missouri  family.  Dr.  Ragan  was 
born  in  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  Feb.  24,  1888,  and  is  a  son  of  Dr.  Stephen  and 
Luvena  (Duncan)  Ragan.'  The  mother  died  in  1911  and  the  father  is 
engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine,  in  Kansas  City.  He  was  born  in 
Gracon  County,  Texas,  in  1864.  He  is  a  graduate  of  the  Kansas  City 
Medical  College,  and  for  27  years  has  been  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
his  profession  in  that  city.  During  the  World  War,  he  enhsted  for 
service  and  did  volunteer  work  for  the  government  in  Kansas  City,  until 
1918  when  he  was  transferred  to  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kan.  and  was  in  the 
service  until  the  close  of  the  war.  He  is  a  son  of  Stephen  C.  Ragan  and 
Josephine  (Chiles)  Ragan.  Stephen  T.  Ragan  was  a  very  early  pioneer 
of  Jackson  County,  Mo.,  and  served  as  county  marshal  there  and  Josephine 
(Chiles)  Ragan,  was  a  member  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  that 
county,  several  members  of  which  are  now  prominent  in  the  affairs  of 
Jackson  County. 

Dr.  Stephen  T.  Ragan,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  has  one  brother. 
Dr.  Walter  H.  Ragan,  who  is  a  practicing  dentist  in  Kansas  City,  Mo. 
During  the  World  War,  he  served  with  the  Dental  Corps,  having  enlisted 
in  1917,  he  was  stationed  at  Fort  Douglas,  Arizona. 

Dr.  Stephen  T.  Ragan  received  a  good  education  in  the  public  schools 
at  Kansas  City  and  then  entered  the  University  Medical  College  of  Kan- 
sas City,  where  he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1911.  He  then  practiced 
medicine  in  Macon  County  until  1915.  He  then  served  an  internship  in  a 
Kansas  City  hospital  and  then  took  post  graduate  course  in  Chicago  and 
engaged  in  the  practice  at  Moberly,  Mo.,  in  August,  1916,  and  when  the 
United  States  entered  the  World  War,  he  volunteered  his  services  in 
April,  1917,  and  was  called  into  service  Aug.  1,  1917,  and  sent  to  London, 
England,  where  he  was  attached  to  the  British  Army.  He  served  one 
year  in  London  and  four  months  in  Belgium.  He  then  was  taken  sick 
with  trench  fever  and  after  being  confined  to  a  hospital  for  two  months, 
he  returned  to  duty  and  served  for  five  months  at  St.  Albans,  England. 
He  was  overseas  for  22  months  and  was  one  of  the  first  three  men  to  go 
overseas  from  Randolph  County.  He  was  mustered  out  of  service  at 
Camp  Dix,  New  Jersey,  in  May,  1919. 

After  his  discharge  from  the  army,  Dr.  Ragan  resumed  his  practice 
at  Moberly  and  is  one  of  the-  successful  physicians  of  Randolph  County. 

Jim  W.  Holman,  of  the  Peoples  Steam  Laundry,  is  one  of  the  enter- 
prising and  successful  citizens  of  Moberly  and  the  Peoples  Steam  Laundry 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  293 

occupies  a  position  among  the  leading  industrial  institutions  of  this  char- 
acter in  the  state.  The  plant  is  located  at  100  North  Williams  street  and 
is  equipped  with  all  modem  machinery  and  appliances  for  handling  a 
general  laundry  business  on  a  large  scale.  They  employ  35  people  and 
have  an  extensive  business.  The  Peoples  Laundry  has  won  a  well  merited 
reputation  for  promptness  and  excellency  of  workmanship. 

Jim  W.  Holman  is  a  native  of  Moberly  and  a  son  of  H.  Frank  and 
Linda  (St.  Clair)  Holman  of  Moberly.  H.  Frank  Holman  is  also  a  native 
of  Randolph  County  and  is  the  senior  partner  of  the  Peoples  Laundry 
Company  and  founded  the  business  in  1898.  A  sketch,  of  him  appears  in 
this  volume. 

Jim  W.  Holman  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Moberly  and  at- 
tended the  Moberly  High  School.  He  later  attended  the  Piitchett  Col- 
lege which  was  conducted  by  U.  S.  Hall,  at  Glasgow  and  afterwards  at- 
tended Westminster  College  at  Fulton,  Mo.  After  completing  school  in 
1909  he  entered  the  laundry  business  at  Moberly  in  partnership  with  his 
father  and  since  that  time  has  devoted  his  attention  to  that  business. 

Mr.  Holman  was  united  in  marriage  Sept.  30,  1915  with  Miss  Pearle 
M.  Wilhite  of  Blytheville,  Ark.  She  is  a  daughter  of  John  F.  and  Laura 
Wilhite,  the  latter  of  whom  is  deceased  and  the  father  resides  at  Blythe- 
ville, Ark. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holman  reside  at  Ui'bandale,  a  suburb  adjoining 
Moberly,  where  Mr.  Holman  is  also  interested  quite  extensively  in  poultry 
raising.  For  the  past  three  years  he  has  been  a  successful  breeder  of 
single  comb  Rhode  Island  Red  chickens,  of  the  standard  bred  variety. 
He  now  has  about  135  hens,  the  breed  of  which  is  of  the  highest  strain 
obtainable.  He  is  also  a  breeder  of  pure  bred  Pointer  dogs  which  bring 
a  good  price.     He  has  sold  dogs  in  all  parts  of  the  country. 

Mr.  Holman  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks  and  has  a  wide  acquaintance  in  Randolph  County  where  he  stands 
high. 

May  J.  Tedford,  a  well  known  and  successful  insurance  man  of 
Moberly  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and  a  descendant  of  some  of  the 
very  early  pioneers  of  this  section  of  the  state.  He  was  born  in  Sugar 
Creek  township,  Feb.  22,  1869  and  is  a  son  of  Frank  and  Mary  Virginia 
(Baird)  Tedford. 

J.  Frank  Tedford,  was  also  born  in  Sugar  Creek  township  March  28, 
1843,  a  son  of  pioneer  parents.    During  the  Civil  War  he  enlisted  in  the 


294  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Confederate  army  and  served  with  General  Price.  Randolph  County  has 
been  his  home  practically  all  his  life.  He  furnished  ties  for  the  Wabash 
railroad  when  it  was  being  constructed  in  this  vicinity.  He  now  resides 
at  112  Kirby  street,  Moberly.  His  mother,  Catherine  Hannah  Tedford, 
was  a  native  of  Tennessee  and  came  to  Randolph  with  her  parents  about 
1807.  They  settled  in  what  later  became  Sugar  Creek  township  and 
were  among  the  very  first  settlers  of  this  part  of  the  state.  They  were 
the  organizers  of  Sugar  Creek  Cumberland  Presbyterian  Church,  the  first 
meeting  being  held  in  the  home  of  Andrew  Hannah,  the  father  of  Cath- 
erine (Hannah)  Tedford.  Andrew  Hannah  and  his  wife  spent  the  re- 
mainder of  their  lives  in  Randolph  County,  after  coming  here,  and  their 
remains  are  buried  in  Sugar  Creek  Cemetery  which  perhaps  is  the  oldest 
regularly  established  cemetery  in  Randolph  County. 

Mary  Virginia  Baird,  mother  of  May  J.  Tedford  of  this  review,  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania  in  1850  and  came  to  Randolph  County  with  her 
parents,  J.  C.  and  Almina  Baird  who  settled  in  Sugar  Creek  township 
shortly  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War.  To  J.  Frank  and  Mary  Virginia 
(Baird)  Tedford  were  born  the  following  children:  May  J.,  the  subject 
of  this  sketch;  Fred  H.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  hotel  business  at  Kansas 
City ;  Allie,  married  N.  C.  Figley,  of  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

May  J.  Tedford  received  his  education  in  the  district  schools  of  Sugar 
Creek  township  and  the  Moberly  public  schools.  In  1893  he  was  elected 
collector  of  the  city  of  Moberly  and  reelected  in  1895  and  in  1897,  serving 
six  years  in  that  office.  He  was  then  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  rais- 
ing for  four  years  when  he  engaged  in  the  insurance  business  in  Moberly 
and  since  that  time  has  successfully  devoted  himself  to  that  field  of 
endeavor. 

Mr.  Tedford  was  married  in  1899  to  Mrs.  Ida  L.  (Elsea)  Last,  of 
Moberly,  Mo.  They  have  one  son,  John  Elsea,  a  student  in  the  Moberly 
High  School. 

E.  G.  Rupp,  a  well  known  citizen  of  Moberly,  who  is  an  extensive 
dealer  in  coal,  wood,  sand,  crushed  stone  and  junk  is  a  native  of  Illinois. 
He  was  bom  at  Quincy,  111.  and  is  the  son  of  F.  J.  and  Hannah  Rupp.  The 
mother  died  at  Moberly  in  1900,  and  the  father  now  resides  in  this  city. 
They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  William,  Moberly, 
Mo.;  Mary  Hannah,  Pawhauska,  Okla.;  Clara,  Tulsa,  Okla.;  Helen,  and 
Agnes  married  Elsworth  Warner  of  Moberly,  Mo.  and  E.  G.,  the  subject 
of  this  sketch. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  295 

F.  J.  Rupp  came  to  Moberly  with  his  family  and  about  a  year  later 
began  to  deal  in  junk  and  shortly  afterwards  engaged  in  the  poultry  busi- 
ness, handling  poultry  in  carload  lots.  After  a  time  he  sold  his  poultry 
business  and  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  which  after  a  time  he  sold. 
However,  he  continued  to  handle  junk  after  first  engaging  in  that  business. 

E.  G.  Rupp  was  educated  in  the  Loretta  Academy  at  Moberly  and 
was  reared  to  a  practical  knowledge  of  his  father's  business,  beginning 
work  with  his  father  when  he  was  12  years.  In  1911,  he  bought  his 
father  out,  and  since  that  time  he  has  conducted  the  business  which  has 
developed  into  large  proportions.  He  has  several  branches  and  handles 
over  150  carloads  annually  of  junk,  alone,  which  is  a  large  business  in 
itself,  to  say  nothing  of  the  other  commodities  in  which  he  deals. 

Mr.  Rupp  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  He  is  a  progressive  citizen  and  one 
of  the  substantial  citizens  of  Moberly  and  Randolph  County. 

August  Merck,  now  living  retired  at  his  home  in  Moberly,  is  one  of 
the  pioneer  business  men  of  Randolph  County  and  for  many  years  was 
successfully  engaged  in  the  bakery  business  at  Moberly.  He  is  a  native 
of  Illinois  and  was  bom  at  Bellville,  111.,  Feb.  23,  1851,  and  is  a  son  of 
Charles  and  Louise  (Knoell)  Merck,  very  early  pioneer  settlers  of  Bell- 
ville, 111.,  who  are  both  now  deceased.  The  mother  died  in  1852  and  the 
father  departed  this  life  in  1881  and  their  remains  are  buried  at  Bell- 
ville. They  emigrated  to  America  in  1833  from  Kreuznath,  Germany, 
both  coming  on  the  same  sailing  vessel  and  were  married  some  time  after 
reaching  America.  The  voyage  across  the  ocean  required  three  months, 
which  was  about  the  average  time  that  it  took  a  sailing  vessel  to  make 
the  trip  in  those  days.  Charles  Merck  was  a  son  of  Carl  Merck,  .who  was 
a  forest  overseer  under  the  Napoleon  the  First. 

After  reaching  this  country,  Charles  Merck  was  married  and  settled 
at  Bellville,  111.  He  had  learned -the  baker's  trade  in  his  native  land  and 
established  a  bakery  at  Belleville,  which  he  conducted  throughout  the  re- 
mainder of  his  life  and  this  business  is  still  being  carried  on  by  the 
widow  of  his  son,  Charles,  Jr.  It  was  established  over  87  years  ago. 
Charles  Merck,  the  father  of  August  Merck,  lived  at  Bellville  during  the 
Civil  War,  and  was  a  strong  supporter  of  the  Union,  although  he  was 
always  a  Democrat  and  an  enthusiastic  supporter  of  Stephen  A.  Douglas. 

August  Merck  was  one  of  seven  children  born  to  his  parents  and  is 
the  only  one  now  living.     He  was /reared  in  Bellville,  111.  and  educated 


296  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

in  the  public  schools  there.  In  early  life,  he  learned  the  baker's  trade 
with  his  partner.  In  1878,  he  came  to  Moberly  and  bought  out  the  bakery 
here  which  was  owned  by  William  Radell,  who  was  one  of  the  first  bakers 
of  Moberly;  this  bakery  was  located  in  the  200  block  on  North  Clark 
sti"eet.  It  was  afterwards  moved  to  Williams  street  and  later  to  Reed 
street,  where  Mr.  Merck  conducted  the  bakery  business  until  1898. 

August  Merck  was  united  in  marriage  Feb.  11,  1880  to  Miss  Mary 
Kaufman  of  Illinois,  a  daughter  of  John  Kaufman.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Merck  have  been  born  four  children  as  follow:  John,  a  barber  living  in 
Moberly ;  Arthur,  an  employe  of  the  Cotton  Belt  Railroad  Company,  Little 
Rock,  Ark.;  Edwin,  a  tailor,  Moberly,  Mo.;  August,  Jr.  chief  clerk  for 
Superintendent  Greenland  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company. 

Mr.  Merck  is  a  member  of  the  Court  of  Honor  and  one  of  the  highly 
respected  and  substantial  pioneer  citizens  of  Randolph  County. 

James  Thomas  Cross,  of  the  J.  T.  Cross  Lumber  Company,  is  the 
present  mayor  of  the  city  of  Moberly  and  a  representative  progressive 
business  man  of  Randolph  County.  He  is  a  native  of  Randolph.  County 
and  a  descendant  of  a  pioneer  family  of  this  state.  Mr.  Cross  was  born 
on  a  farm  adjoining  the  town  site  of  Clark,  Mo.,  Aug.  6,  1856,  and  is  a 
son  of  William  B.  and  Mary  (Shores)  Cross,  both  natives  of  Howard 
County,  Mo.  William  B.  Cross  was  a  son  of  John  Cross,  a  Kentuckian, 
who  came  to  Missouri  and  settled  in  Howard  County  at  a  very  early 
day  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  there.  His  remains  are  buried 
in  a  privkte  cemetery  on  the  old  Cross  homestead  near  Armstrong,  Mo. 
William  B.  Cross  grew  to  manhood  in  Howard  County,  and  after  his  mar- 
riage, settled  on  a  farm  in  Randolph  County  near  Clark,  and  he  and 
his  wife,  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives  in  this  county  and  their 
remains  are  buried  in  Chapel  Grove  Cemetery. 

William  B.  and  Mary  (Shores)  Cross  were  the  parents  of  the  follow- 
ing children:  J.  N.,  Modesto,  Calif.;  Mrs.  Susan  Martin,  died  at  Clark, 
Mo.;  James  Thomas,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Anna,  died  at  age  of  7 
years;  Clay,  residfes  at  Clark,  Mo.;  Mrs.  Cornelia  Trailkill,  Clark,  Mo.; 
Mollie,  married  Dr.  R.  A.  Wood,  Clark,  Mo. ;  Samuel,  Clark,  Mo. ;  Marvin, 
Clark,  Mo.;  and  Charles,  died  at  the  age  of  16  years. 

James  T.  Cross  attended  the  public  schools  of  his  neighborhood  and 
then  entered  the  Missouri  University  at  Columbia,  where  he  was  grad- 
uated in  the  class  of  1881.  He  devoted  a  number  of  years  to  teaching 
in  early  life  and  was  recognized  as  one  of  the  successful  educators  in 


.1    T.   CROSS 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  297 

central  Missouri.  During  this  course  of  his  career  as  teacher,  he  was 
principal  of  the  public  schools  at  Renick,  Sturgeon  and  Brunswick,  Mo. 
He  then  accepted  the  position  as  manager  for  the  Flagg  Lumber  Com- 
pany at  Clark  and  New  Franklin  and  was  thus  engaged  until  1907.  He 
then  came  to  Moberly  and  purchased  the  Eberhardt  Lumber  Yard,  which 
was  located  on  North  William  street.  Shortly  afterwards,  he  bought 
property  on  North  Clark  street  and  organized  the  J.  T.  Cross  Lumber  Com- 
pany in  partnership  with  R.  L.  Kingsbury,  and  they  have  conducted 
the  business  to  the  present  time  and  have  met  with  unquaMed  success. 
The  J.  T.  Cross  Lumber  Company  is  one  of  the  substantial  business  insti- 
tutions of  Randolph  County  and  does  an  extensive  business.  Their  offices 
and  lumber  yard  are  located  at  311  to  323  North  Clark  street.  They 
carry  a  large  stock  of  lumber  and  various  building  materials,  including 
almost  everything  ordinarily  required  in  the  building  trades. 

May  28,  1893,  James  T.  Cross  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss 
Cora  Woods  of  Boone  County,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Robert  and 
Elizabeth  Woods,  the  former  of  whom  is  now  deceased  and  the  mother 
resides  at  Sturgeon,  Mo.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cross  were  bom  two  children, 
Harold  and  Hildah,  twins,  who  died  at  the  age  of  six  months. 

Mr.  Cross  has  ever  taken  a  commendable  interest  in  public  affairs 
and  while  a  resident  of  New  Franklin  he  served  as  president  of  the  school 
board;  also  president  of  the  building  and  loan  association.'  In  1919,  he 
was  elected  mayor  of  Moberly.  He  is  giving  Moberly  a  good,  clean  busi- 
ness administration — a  business  administration  by  a  business  man — 
which  is  a  refreshing  condition  in  this  age  of  a  multitude  of  untried 
theories  and  isms  in  municipal  government. 

Mr.  Cross  has  a  wide  acquaintance  in  this  section  of  the  state  and 
ranks  high.    He  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge. 

James  R.  O'Brian,  truckman  at  the  Wabash  shops,  Moberly,  Mo.,  was 
bom  at  Harrisonburg,  Rockingham  County,  Va.,  Sept.  20,  1870  and.  is  a 
son  of  Hugh  and  Mary  E.  (Kilby)  O'Brian. 

Hugh  O'Brian  came  to  Missouri  with  his  family  in  1878  when  James 
R.  of  this  review  was  only  eight  years  old.  They  settled  in  Howard 
County  where  the  father  bought  a  farm  from  Thomas  Ray  and  here 
he  was  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising  and  met  with  success.  He 
and  his  wife  both  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives  in  Howard  County. 
His  remains  are  buried  in  the  Gilliard  Church  Cemetery  and  his  wife  is 
buried  at  Bethel  Church.    They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  chil- 


298  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

dren:  James  R.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  William,  Houston,  Texas; 
Emmet,  Fort  Worth,  Texas;  Earnest  and  Ed  H.,  twins,  the  former  of 
whom  resides  at  Fort  Worth,  Texas  and  the  latter  on  the  home  farm  in 
Howard  County;  and  Mrs.  Letita  Shaw,  of  Montrose,  Ark. 

James  R.  O'Brian  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Howard  County 
and  attended  the  Hocker  School  in  Howard  County  and  also  studied  under 
Professor  Cockrell  at  Fayette,  Mo.  He  followed  farming  until  Feb.  14, 
1901  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  and 
for  the  past  12  years  has  been  truck  foreman  in  the  shops  of  this  com- 
pany at  Moberly  and  has  under  his  charge  from  six  to  ten  men.  In  1919, 
he  was  returned  to  truckman  and  is  not  foreman.  Mr.  O'Brian  is  an 
efficient  employee  and  a  substantial  representative  citizen  of  Moberly. 
He  owns  a  comfortable  modem  home  at  546  Johnson  street  where  he  and 
his  family  reside. 

Mr.  O'Brian  was  married  Dec.  19,  1893  to  Miss  Mattie  Doherty  of 
Howard  County,  Mo.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Robert  and  Martha  (Ball) 
Doherty,  who  reside  on  their  farm  of  263  acres  in  Howard  County.  They 
are  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Mrs.  Mae  Graps;  Mrs.  Eula 
Roberts;  Mrs.  Olde  O'Brian,  all  of  whom  reside  in  Howard  County;  Mrs. 
James  R.  O'Brian  of  this  review  and  Richard  Doherty  who  died  in  Sep- 
tember, 1905  and  is  buried  at  New  Hope  Church. 

To  Mr.  ^and  Mrs.  James  R.  O^Brian  have  been  bom  the  following 
children:  Ethel,  married  Earnest  Myers  of, Fall  City,  Neb.;  Orvil  O'Brian 
who  is  connected  with  the  Exchange  Bank  of  Kansas  City,  Mo. ;  and  Mary 
Bell  at  home  with  her  parents.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  O'Brian  are  members  of 
the  Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security  and  the  Court  of  Honor  and  she  is  a 
member  of  the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees  and  Mr.  O'Brian  holds  member- 
ship in  the  B.  R.  C.  of  America. 

Hartley  A.  McCoy,  chief  clerk  to  the  master  mechanic  of  the  Wabash 
Railroad  at  Moberly,  Mo.,  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  substantial  citizens 
of  Randolph  County.  Mr.  McCoy  was  bom  at  Ottumwa,  Iowa,  Nov.  8, 
1875,  and  is  the  son  of  Alexander  Brown  and  Jennie  Elizabeth  (Thomp- 
son) McCoy,  the  former  a  native  of  Ohio  and  the  latter  of  Tennessee. 
The  mother  was  accidentally  killed  at  the  Coates  street  railroad  crossing 
in  Moberly  in  1903  and  her  remains  rest  in  Oakland  Cemetery  and  the 
father  of  whom  a  sketch  appears  in  this  volume  resides  in  Moberly.  He 
is  now  county  judge  of  Randolph  County  from  the  western  district.  To 
Alexander  Brown  and  Jennie  Elizabeth    (Thompson)   McCoy  were  born 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  299 

the  following  children:  Hartley  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  Bertha 
who  married  William  Stephens,  Sedalia,  Mo. 

Hartley  A.  McCoy  came  to  Moberly  with  his  parents  and  was  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools  here.  He  has  made  his  own  way  since  he  was 
16  years  old,  beginning  as  an  office  boy  in  the  general  forertian's  office  of 
the  Wabash  machine  shops  at  Moberly.  He  then  served  three  years 
apprenticeship  as  a  pattern  maker  and  then  entered  the  master  ca*" 
builder's  office  at  Moberly  in  a  clerical  capacity  and  on  Jan.  1,  1913,  he 
became  chief  clerk  to  the  master  mechanic  and  has  since  served  in  that 
capacity.  Mr.  McCoy  has  had  a  vast  amount  of  experience  and  is  one  of 
the  valued  and  trusted  employees  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company,  hav- 
ing been  steadily  in  the  employ  of  this  company  since  1891. 

Mr.  McCoy  is  a  member  of  the  National  Union,  Modem  Woodmen  of 
America  and  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons.  Mr.  McCoy  and 
his  daughter,  Louise,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  Moberly  High  School,  re- 
side with  Mr.  McCoy's  father  at  320  Burkhart  street,  Moberly,  Mo. 

H.  A.  Grimes,  payroll  clerk  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company,  is  one 
of  the  well  and  favorably  known  citizens  of  Moberly  and  a  member  of 
one  of  the  prominent  pioneer  families  of  Randolph  County.  He  was  born 
just  east  of  Moberly  near  the  city  limits  Nov.  12,  1861  and  is  the  son  of 
W.  G.  and  Virginia  F.  (Terrill)  Grimes  both  of  whom  are  deceased. 

W.  G.  Grimes  was  a  native  of  Virginia  and  came  to  Missouri  with 
his  parents  who  settled  in  Randolph  County,  east  of  Moberly  where  he 
and  his  wife  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives.  W.  G.  Grimes  was  reared 
to  farm  life  and  followed  farming  and  the  dairy  business  and  also  worked 
at  the  carpenter  trade.  Later  he  conducted  a  grocery  store  in  Moberly. 
He  died  at  the  age  of  77  years  and  Lis  wife  died  at  the  age  of  72  years. 
They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  H.  A.,  the  subject  of 
this  sketch;  Minta  Grimes,  who  resides  in  Moberly;  Mrs.  Annie  Garrett 
lives  in  Monroe  County,  Mo. ;  Henrietta,  died  in  infancy ;  James  was  a 
locomotive  engineer  and  died  at  Moberly  at  the  age  of  40  years;  Mrs. 
Lena  L.  Thackston,  Moberly,  Mo.;  Lucretia,  married  Omar  Martin. 

H.  A.  Grimes  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  educated  in  the 
public  schools  and  graduated  from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  1880. 
He  and  W.  A.  Rothwell  who  is  now  deceased  were  the  first  two  graduates 
from  the  'Moberly  High  School.  Mr.  Rothwell  was  later  prominent  in 
the  affairs  of  Randolph  County  and  a  leading  Democrat  of  the  state.  He 
served  as  chairman  of  the  State  Democratic  Committee.  At  one  time 
he  was  a  law  partner  of  Alex  H.  Waller  the  editor  of  this  history. 


300  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

After  completing  school  Mr.  Grimes  became  a  clerk  in  the  clothing 
store  of  A.  B.  Thompson  and  Company  of  Moberly  and  was  in  the  employ 
of  that  concern  for  12  years.  He  then  was  employed  by  the  Martin  Cloth- 
ing Company  for  a  time  and  for  two  years  clerked  in  a  grocery  store. 
He  then  served  as  constable  and  deputy  sheriff  for  four  years.  In  April, 
1904,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  as  clerk 
and  timekeeper  and  in  March,  1913,  he  was  promoted  to  payroll  clerk  and 
has  held  that  position  to  the  present  time.  Mr.  Grimes  is  capable  and 
efficient  and  a  conscientious  employee. 

Mr.  Grimes  was  married  in  1885  to  Miss  Betty  Barnes  of  Moberly 
who  departed  this  life  in  February,  1913  and  her  remains  are  buried  in 
Oakland  Cemetery.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Grimes  were  bom  two  children: 
Lena,  married  J.  J.  Dameron,  of  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  they  have  one 
child,  Elizabeth  Dameron;  and  Opal  married  I.  E.  McCabe,  of  Moberly, 
Mo. 

Mr.  Grimes  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and 
one  of  the  well  known  and  highly  respected  citizens  of  Randolph  County. 

Paul  S.  Witten,  a  veteran  of  the  World  War  and  the  first  commander 
of  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  No.  6,  American  Legion,  of  which  he  is  a  charter 
member,  is  a  descendant  of  a  prominent  pioneer  family  of  Missouri.  He 
was  born  in  Moberly,  Jan.  21,  1891,  the  son  of  Thomas  R.  and  Laura  E. 
(Nichols)  Witten. 

Thomas  R.  Witten  was  born  in  Grundy  County,  Mo.  and  was  killed 
in  a  railroad  accident  at  Benton  City,  Mo.,  Dec.  24,  1905,  at  the  age  of  44 
years.  He  was  a  son  of  Samuel  Witten,  a  Kentuckian,  who  came  to  Mis- 
souri at  a  very  early  date  and  settled  in  Grundy  County,  where  he  entered 
government  land. 

Laura  E.  (Nichols)  Witten,  mother  of  Paul  S.  Witten  now  resides 
in  Moberly.  She  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  very  early  pioneer  families 
of  Missouri.  Her  father  served  in  the  Mexican  War  under  Colonel 
Donaphin,  having  volunteered  with  the  Missouri  troops  which  were  com- 
manded by  Donaphin.  He  was  the  standard  bearer  and  the  ilag  which 
he  carried  in  the  Mexican  War  is  now  in  possession  of  his  descendants. 
He  was  one  of  the  first  graduates  of  the  University  of  Missouri.  He 
was  a  farmer  and  merchant  and  after  the  Civil  War  he  was  engaged  in 
business  at  Edinburgh,  Mo. 

Paul  S.  Witten  is  one  of  two  sons  born  to  his  parents.  The  other 
son,  Guy,  died  at  the  age  of  29  years  and  his  remains  and  also  the 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  301 

father's  are  buried  in  the  Perry  Cemetery  at  Trenton,  Mo.  Paul  S.  Wit- 
ten  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  graduated  from  the  Moberly 
High  School  in  1909.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  Doctor  Harlan,  a 
druggist  of  Moberly,  and  later  was  in  the  employ  of  W.  0.  Baker,  of 
Centralia,  Mo.,  and  at  the  death  of  his  brother  he  returned  to  Moberly 
and  was  in  the  employ  of  John  F.  Curry  for  three  years  when  be  became 
a  partner  in  the  business  and  had  been  thus  interested  for  two  years 
when  the  United  States  entered  the  World  War.  Mr.  Witten  then  sold 
his  interest  in  the  business  and  on  Dec.  14,  1917  he  enlisted  in  the  United 
States  Army  and  the  Medical  Corps  at  St.  Louis,  Mo.  He  was  with  the 
Medical  Supply  Depot  at  St.  Louis  for  a  time  when  he  was  sent  to  New- 
port News  and  after  one  months  training  was  sent  to  France  with  Field 
Medical  Supply  Company  No.  9,  arriving  in  France,  Oct.  10,  1918.  He 
was  stationed  on  the  front  at  St.  Mazaire,  France,  and  then  sent  to  Tours, 
the  S.  0.  S.  headquarters  and  from  there  to  Gievi'ers  and  was  stationed 
at  the  latter  place  until  May,  1919,  when  he  was  returned  to  the  United 
States  and  received  his  honorable  discharge  after  being  in  the  service 
about  18  months.  He  returned  to  Moberly  and  shortly  afterwards  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Taylor  Music  Company. 

Mr.  Witten  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  the  American  Legion  and  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Shrine.  He  is  one  of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  men  of 
Randolph  County. 

A.  W.  Jones,  of  the  firm  of  Jones  and  Hale  Grocery  Company,  has 
been  a  resident  of  Moberly  for  37  years  and  since  1919  has  been  in  the 
grocery  business  with  Mrs.  Nellie  B.  Hale,  his  sister-in-law. 

A.  W.  Jones  was  bom  in  Howard  County,  Mo.,  Jan.  2,  1868  and  was 
the  only  child  born  to  Dr.  George  W.  and  Nancy  (Lynch)  Jones.  Dr. 
George  W.  Jones,  the  father,  was  a  native  of  Salem  County,  N.  J.,  and  his 
wife  was  born  in  Macon  County,  Mo.  Doctor  Jones  came  to  Missouri  in 
1866,  and  settled,  near  Bunker  Hill,  Howard  County,  where  he  lived  until 
1874,  when  he  removed  to  Saline  County,  Mo.  Seven  years  later  he  went 
to  Cunningham,  Chariton  County  and  in  1883  the  family  settled  in 
Moberly. 

A.  W.  Jones  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  this  state  and  in 
early  life  worked  at  his  trade  as  coach  painter  for  the  Wabash  Railroad 
Company  for  13  years.  He  lost  his  eyesight  in  1905  and  shortly  after- 
wards  engaged   in   the   grocery   business.    Notwithstanding    the    great 


302  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

handicap  under  which  Mr.  Jones  labored  he  has  been  unusually  successful 
in  business  and  the  firm  is  one  of  the  prosperous  and  well  conducted 
retail  establishments "  of  this  city.  The  store  is  located  at  1120  Myra 
street.  Mr.  Jones  is  assisted  in  the  store  by  his  wife  and  sister-in-law 
and  Mrs.  Hale  and  they  handle  a  large  volume  of  business.  The  store 
building  is  20x75  feet  and  a  barn  22x32  in  the  rear  is  utilized  as  a  storage 
warehouse  and  the  Jones  residence  is  located  next  to  the  store.  The 
Jones  residence  is  one  of  the  comfortable  and  well  arranged  homes  of 
the  city.  It  is  equipped  with  all  modem  improvements  and  was  built  in 
1915. 

A.  W.  Jones  was  married  Nov.  23,  1897,  to  Miss  Eosa  M.  Neth  of 
Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  (Gingrich)  Neth,  the 
former  a  native  of  Germany  who  came  to  America  when  he  was  13  years 
of  age  and  the  latter  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  They  were  married  in  * 
Hannibal,  Mo.,  Nov.  28,  1869,  and  came  to  Moberly  in  1871  and  now 
reside  in  this  city.  John  Neth  was  one  of  the  first  cigar  manufacturers 
in  Moberly.  He  engaged  in  manufacturing  cigars  here  March  7,  1871 
and  during  his  active  career  did  an  extensive  business.  He,  made  the 
famous  "Moss  Agate"  cigar. 

Joseph  M.  Gingrich,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Jones,  was  also  a  pioneer 
settler  of  this  city.  He  came  here  April  8,  1868  and  was  foreman  of  the 
first  railroad  repair  shop  here.  The  shop  was  located  on  the  present  site 
of  the  Young  Mens  Christian  Association  building.  He  bought  the  first 
musical  instrument  in  Moberly.  It  was  a  melodeon  and  is  now  in  the 
possession  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  John  Neth.  Mr.  Gingrich  died  June 
15,  1916. 

Mrs.  Rosa  M.  (Neth)  Jones  is  one  of  the  following  children  born  to 
her  parents:  Rosa  M.,  wife  of  A.  W.  Jones,  of  this  review;  Mrs.  C.  A. 
Woodington,  Moberly;  Mrs.  W.  P.  Vandergrift,  Moberly,  Mo.;  Mrs.  G.  G. 
Levick;  Mrs.  H.  B.  Hale;  Mrs.  Charles  Kelly;  John  Neth;  Mrs.  James 
Sincoe  and  Mrs.  Paul  Hackett,  all  of  whom  reside  in  Moberly.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Jones  have  been  born  two  children:  Alline  N.  and  Rosanna. 

Leslie  G.  Burklund,  a  leading  jeweler  of  Moberly  who  is  proprietor 
of  one  of  Moberly 's  best  jewelry  stores  located  at  314  West  Reed  street 
has  been  engaged  in  business  at  this  location  since  May  4,  1916.  Mr. 
Burklund  was  bom  at  Osage  City,  Kan.,  April  27,  1887  and  is  the  son  of 
Giis  Burklund  and  Elizabeth  (Robbins)  Burklund,  both  of  whom  are  now 
deceased.    The  father  was  a  pioneer  of  Rock  Island,  111.,  and  was  a  jeweler 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  303 

by  trade.  He  died  at  Osage  City,  Kan.,  in  1903.  His  wife  who  was  a 
native  of  Jacksonville,  111.,  died  at  Osage  City,  Kan.,  in  1893  and  their 
remains  are  buried  at  Moline,  111.  They  were  the  parents  of  two  children : 
Leslie  G.,  whose  name  introduces  this  review  and  Almeda  Burklund  who 
resides  at  Boise,  Idaho. 

Leslie  G.  Burklund  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Osage  City,  Kan.,  and  in  1903  began  an  apprenticeship  at  the  jewelers 
and  watchmakers  trade  at  Moline,  111.,  and  afterwards  worked  at  his 
trade  in  Chicago  and  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  in  1916  engaged  in  business 
in  Moberly  and  since  coming  here  has  met  with  satisfactory  success  and 
built  up  a  large  trade.  He  carries  a  very  complete  line  of  high  grade 
watches  and  jewelry  and  kindred  articles  usually  found  in  a  first  class 
jewelry  store.  He  also  handles  Edison  phonographs  and  records  and 
has  built  up  an  extensive  trade  in  that  line. 

Mr.  Burklund  was  married  Jan.  6,  1909  to  Miss  Helen  Walsh  of  Kan- 
sas City,  Mo.,  a  daughter  of  William  Walsh  who  now  resides  in  that  city. 
Mrs.  Burklund's  mother  is  deceased.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burklund  have 
been  bom  one  child,  Betty. 

Mr.  Burklund  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks  and  since  coming  to  Moberly  he  has  acquired  an  extensive  ac- 
quaintance and  ranks  as  one  of  the  substantial  and  reliable  business  men 
of  this  city. 

Allen  C.  White,  of  the  firm  of  Goddard-White  &  Company,  wholesale 
automobile  accessory  dealers  in  Moberly,  is  a  veteran  of  the  World  War, 
having  served  as  sergeant.  He  is  a  son  of  Benjamin  R.  and  Katie  V. 
(Corbett)  White,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume.  He  was  born 
in  Moberly,  July  22,  1890  and  was  reared  in  Moberly.  After  receiving  a 
good  preliniinary  education  he  took  a  course  in  the  Military  Academy  at 
Columbia  and  later  attended  the  University  of  Missouri,  at  Columbia, 
Mo.  He  then  engaged  in  the  automobile  business  at  Moberly,  later  at 
Springfield,  111.  and  was  thus  occupied  when  the  United  States  entered 
the  World  War. 

On  May  23,  1917,  Allen  C.  White  enlisted  at  Moberly  in  the  4th  Regi- 
ment, Missouri  National  Guard  and  shortly  afterwards  was  sent  to 
Nevada  with  his  command  when  the  Missouri  National  Guard  was 
mobilized  for  service.  From  Nevada  he  went  to  Fort.  Sill,  Okla.  with  the 
Missouri  troops  which  was  organized  into  the  35th  Division.  After  about 
nine  months  training  at  Ft.  Sill,  on  May  10,  1918,  Mr.  White  went  with 


304  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

the  110th  Engineers  overseas.  They  first  operated  with  the  British  Army 
at  Amiens  and  later  with  the  French  Army  and  were  with  the  Division 
Engineers  at  the  front.  Mr.  White  participated  in  the  battles  of  St. 
Mihiel  and  the  Argonne  Forest  and  saw  some  of  the  heaviest  fighting  of 
the  wat,  On  Sept.  29th,  in  the  battle  of  the  Meuse-Argonne  Forest  he 
was  wounded,  having  been  struck  by  a  piece  of  an  exploding  shell. 
Although  wounded  and  unable  for  service  for  ten  days  he  remained  with' 
his  command.  He  served  as  sergeant  with  his  company  and  was  mustered 
out  May  3,  1919,  after  having  served  nearly  two  years,  during  which  time 
he  saw  a  great  deal  of  severe  fighting. 

After  his  discharge  from  the  army,  Mr.  White  returned  to  Moberly 
and  formed  a  partnership  with  Mr.  W.  F.  Goddard  under  the  firm  name  of 
Goddard-White  &  Company.  They  deal  in  automobile  supplies  and  ac- 
cessories and  carry  a  very  complete  line  and  have  built  up  an  extensive 
business.  They  are  located  at  107  North  Williams  street  and  have  a  floor 
space  of  80x100  feet.  Mr.  White  spends  most  of  his  time  on  the  road 
in  the  interest  of  the  business  and  they  employ  three  other  salesmen. 

Mr.  White  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge  and  a  charter  member 
of  Theodore  Bazan  Post  No.  6,  American  Legion.  He  is  one  of  the 
progressive  young  business  men  of  Moberly. 

Garfield  A.  Smith,  of  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  widely  known  and  suc- 
cessful automobile  dealers  of  the  state.  He  handles  the  Maxwell,  Chal- 
mers, Oakland,  Hupmobile  cars,  Sampson  tractors,  trucks,  and  has  an 
automobile  repair  business,  service  station  and  deals .  in  accessories  of 
all  kinds  and  also  tires.  Mr.  Smith  also  represents  the  Almo  Farm  Power 
and  Lighting  System.  His  office  and  garage  is  located  at  523-525  West 
Reed  street.  Moberly,  with  branches  at  Fayette,  New  Franklin  and  Hunts- 
ville. 

Garfield  A.  Smith  was  born  in  Macon  County,  Mo.,  Oct.  8,  1880. 
His  parents  were  George  R.  and  Sarah  M.  (Ballenger)  Smith,  to  whom 
but  two  children  were  bom,  Garfield  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and 
Zelva,  who  married  E.  D.  Houston,  of  Kansas  City,  Mo.  The  father  also 
was  bom  in  Macon  County  in  1857  and  his  parents  were  Kentuckians 
and  early  settlers  of  this  state.  George  R.  Smith  was  a  farmer  and  now 
lives  in  retirement  at  Macon,  Mo.  Garfield  A.  Smith  was  reared  on  his 
father's  farm  and  attended  the  district  school  in  the  winter  time  and 
helped  on  the  home  farm  in  the  summers.     After  finishing  the  public 


r,     A     SMTTTT 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  305 

schools  of  Macon  County,  he  entered  the  State  Normal  School  at  Kirks- 
ville,  where  he  was  graduated  from  the  four  year  course  in  1901.  He 
then  taught  school  in  the  Macon  County  schools  until  1903,  when  he 
entered  the  mail  service  at  Bevier,  Mo.  As  this  work  did  not  take  up 
all  his  time,  Mr.  Smith  accepted  a  position  in  a  mercantile  establishment 
there  until  1912.  He  then  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  the  automo- 
bile business.  When  he  started  out  in  life  he  had  $34.00;  his  father 
gave  him  a  horse  and  this  he  sold  for  $35,  which  was  his  start.  His 
stock  is  now  rated,  conservatively,  at  $75,000. 

On  April  17,  1917,  Mr.  Smith  was  married  to  Miss  Elgia  L.  Stokes, 
a  nativ-e  of  Cairo,  Randolph  County.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Thomas  W. 
and  Janara  (Brown)  Stokes,  natives  of  Missouri,  now 'living  in  Moberly. 
]^r.  Stokes  for  many  years  was  one  of  the  successful  farmers  and  stock 
raisers  of  this  section  who  has  retired  from  active  business. 

Mr.  Smith  is  a  Democrat  and  he  and  Mrs.  Smith  are  members  of 
the  Christian  church,  and  Mr.  Smith  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Mr.  Smith  is  a  progressive  and  public  spirited 
citizen  of  Moberly  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  substantial  business 
men  of  Randolph  County. 

Dr.  L.  A.  Bazan,  a  well  known  physician  and  surgeon  of  Moberly  is 
a  native  of  Austria  and  was  bom  May  12,  1862.  He  is  the  son  of  Thomas 
and  Nellie  (Tutaj)  Bazan  who  now  reside  at  St.  Joseph,  Mo.  His  father 
is  in  his  84th  year  and  the  mother  is  77  years  of  age. 

Doctor  Bazan  received  an  excellent  education  in  his  n&tive  land 
where  he  also  read  medicine.  In  1881  he  came  to  America  and  after 
being  here  for  the  brief  period  of  six  months,  he  had  mastered  the  Eng- 
lish language  so  thoroughly  that  he  was  able  to  accept  a  position  as  an 
instructor  in  a  business  college.  Doctor  Bazan  is  not  only  a  thorough 
scholar  but  he  is  especially  skilled  in  languages  and  is  capable  of  speak- 
ing and  writing  nine  different  languages.  In  1886  he  was  a  traveling 
salesman  for  the  C.  S.  Goldsmith  Shoe  Company  of  Chicago.  In  1889 
he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  in  Chicago.  Later  he  located  in 
St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  practice  until  1898.  After 
which  he  practiced  in  Saline  County  four  years  and  Chariton  County  four 
years  and  in  1906  he  went  to  Renick  then  to  Clark.  In  1912  he  came  to 
Moberly  where  he  has  since  been  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  pro- 
fession. 

Doctor  Bazan  was  married  at  Chicago,  111.,  July  1,  1886,  to  Miss 


306  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Pauline  Kazik  of  St.  Joseph,  Mo.  and  to  this  union  have  been  born  the 
following  children:  Thomas,  bom  in  Chicago,  111.,  Nov.  22,  1888,  now 
manager  for  Block  Brother's  Department  Store,  St.  Joseph,  Mo.;  Helen, 
bom  Sept.  30,  1890  and  died  May  13,  1904;  Genevieve,  born  Jan.  10, 
1893,  a  trained  nurse,  at  Moberly,  Mo.;  Theodore  B.,  who  died  on  the 
field  of  battle  in  France  and  further  mention  of  whom  is  made  in  this 
volume ;  L.  Marion,  bom  Jan.  1,  1898,  married  Robert  Caldwell,  a  foreman 
in  the  Brown  Company's  Shoe  Factory  at  Moberly;  Francis  A.,  bom  April 
9,  1901,  a  bookkeeper  in  the  Brown  Shoe  Factory  at  Moberly  and  Margie 
J.,  born  Nov.  19,  1903,  a  member  of  the  senior  class  of  the  Moberly  High 
School.  Dr.  Bazan  has  a  wide  acquaintance  in  Moberly  and  vicinity  and 
the  Bazan  family  stands  high  in  the  community. 

Theodore  B.  Bazan,  in  whose  honor  the  American  Legion,  Post  No.  6, 
of  Moberly,  was  named  will  long  be  remembered  as  one  who  gave  his  life 
to  his  country  and  died  a  heroic  and  self  sacrificing  death.  He  was  born 
at  St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  July  29,  1895,  and  attended  the  parochial  school  there 
for  five  years.  After  the  family  removed  to  Saline  County  he  also  at- 
tended the  parochial  there  and  later  at  Salisbury,  Mo.  He  then  attended 
the  pubhc  schools  of  Clark  and  Moberly,  graduating  from  the  high  school 
at  Moberly.  He  then  entered  the  State  University  at  Columbia,  Mo., 
where  he  took  the  medical  course  for  two  years  and  when  the  United 
States  entered  the  World  War  he  entered  the  Officer's  Training  School  at 
Ft.  Riley,  Kan.,  in  May,  1917,  and  after  a  period  of  training,  he  was  com- 
missioned a  second  lieutenant  in  August  of  the  same  year  and  assigned 
for  the  138th  Infantry  and  on  April  20,  1918,  he  was  promoted  to  first 
lieutenant.  In  May,  1918,  he  went  to  France  with  his  command  and  was 
stationed  in  Vosges  Mountains,  and  also  participated  in  the  engagement 
at  Verdun.  He  also  participated  in  the  great  drive  in  the  Argonne  Forest 
and  as  that  great  battle  raged  on  September  27th,  he  was  mortally 
wounded  during  the  evening  between  six  and  ten  o'clock.  His  death  was 
due  to  the  explosion  of  a  high  power  shell,  which  tore  away  the  right 
side  of  his  abdomen.  As  he  lay  mortally  wounded,  a  detail  of  soldiers 
came  to  care  for  him,  and  he,  knowing  that  he  was  mortally  wounded, 
and  that  he  could  not  live  long,  requested  the  detail  to  not  give  him  any 
attention,  but  ordered  them  to  direct  their  attention  to  others,  less 
severely  wounded,  that  their  lives  might  be  saved,  and  while  waiting 
there,  he  died  and  was  buried  on  the  field  of  honor. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  307 

Samuel  A.  Magruder,  a  former  sheriff  of  Randolph  County,  who  has 
been  a  capable  and  efficient  njember  of  the  Moberly  police  force,  is  a 
nati-\?e  of  Missouri.  He  was  born  in  Shelby  County,  Aug.  23,  1862  and  is 
a  son  of  S.  A.  and  Virginia  (Jacobs)  Magruder,  both  natives  of  Culpeper, 
Va.  They  came  to  Missouri  with  their  respective  parents  and  grew  up 
and  were  married  in  Shelby  County  and  came  to  Moberly  in  1887.  They 
are  both  now  deceased  and  their  remains  are  buried  in  Oakland  Cemetery. 

Samuel  A.  Magruder  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  came 
to  Moberly  with  his  parents  in  1887.  He  was  employed  in  the  freight 
department  of  the  Wabash  railroad  for  about  14  years.  In  1913,  Mr. 
Magruder  was  elected  sheriff  of  Randolph  County.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Moberly  police  force  about  eight  years  and  has  to  his  credit  a  splendid 
record  of  faithful  and  efficient  service,  he  resigning  April  21,  1920.  His 
term  of  sheriff  was  characterized  by  the  same  high  class  service  and 
unswerving  devotion  to  duty  as  he  had  given  the  police  department  of 
Moberly. 

Mr.  Magruder  was  married  in  Monroe  County  in  1902  to  Miss  Noel 
Glasscock,  a  daughter  of  Henry  Glasscock,  who  is  now  deceased,  as  is 
also  his  wife.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Magruder  has  been  born  one  child,  Naomi, 
who  resides  at  home  with  her  parents. 

Mr.  Magruder  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  He  takes  a  prominent  part 
in  political  affairs  and  is  one  of  the  progressive  citizens  of  Randolph 
County.  He  has  a  wide  acquaintance  and  by  his  courteous  manner  and 
obliging  methods  has  made  many  friends. 

A.  A.  Capp,  manager  of  the  men's  clothing  and  furnishing  depart- 
ment of  the  J.  S.  Bowers  and  Son  Department  Store  of  Moberly  has  had 
a  long  experience  in  the  mercantile  business  and  has  been  in  the  employ 
of  this  company  for  over  32  years.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri,  born  in 
Monroe  County  and  is  the  son  of  M.  P.  and  Margaret  J.  (Wood)  Capp, 
both  now  deceased.  M.  P.  Capp  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  was  a 
Randolph  County  pioneer.  He  came  to  Cairo  at  an  early  date  and  was 
engaged  in  farming  and  the  mercantile  business  and  for  a  time  was  en- 
gaged in  business  at  Leverick's  Mill,  later  at  Leesburg  and  then  at  Wood- 
laun,  Monroe  County  and  later  Cairo,  and  spent  the  latter  part  of  his 
life  in  this  county.  He  and  his  wife  were  buried  in  the  Pleasant  View 
Church  CemiCtery  which  is  located  east  of  Cairo.  They  were  the  parents 
of  ten  children,  nine  of  whom  grew  to  maturity :  John  W.,  was  a  farmer 
and  died  at  Cairo^  at  the  age  of  25  years ;  Mrs.  Jane  Gibson,  resides  at 


308  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Cairo,  Mo. ;  A.  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch ;  Rev.  E.  M.,  a  minister  of  the 
Methodist  denomination,  Milan,  Mc;  Mrs.  Ella  Walker,  died  at  Cairo, 
Mo.;  Mrs.  Emma  Newton,  died  at  Moberly,  Mo.;  Mrs.  Alice  Bakef  re- 
sides at  Cairo,  Mo.;  J.  C,  a  coal  dealer,  Moberly,  Mo.;  and  William,  who 
was  accidently  killed  when  13  years  of  age.  The  eldest  of  the  family, 
Elisha,  died  in  infancy. 

A.  A.  Capp  received  a  good  public  school  education  in  the  schools 
of  the  early  days  in  Monroe  County,  receiving  a  part  of  his  education  in 
a  typical  old  pioneer  log  school  house.  He  began  his  mercantile  career 
with  his  father  at  an  early  date  and  for  six  years  was  at  Cairo.  He  came 
to  Moberly  in  1887  and  entered  the  employ  of  Bowersi  and  Reese  Company 
which  later  became  J.  S.  Bowers  and  Son  and  since  Sept.  1,  1887  has^  been 
identified  with  this  company  and  is -now  manager  of  the  men's  clothing 
and  furnishing  department. 

Mr.  Capp  was  first  married  in  1877  to  Miss  Fannie  Cochran  of  Cairo, 
Randolph  County,  who  died  in  1881  leaving  one  daughter.  Era,  who  is  now 
the  wife  of  W.  H.  Eslen,  Moberly,  Mo.  Mr.  Capp's  present  wife  bore 
the  maiden  name  of  Emma  Belle  Nagley,  and  she  was  born  in  Ohio  and 
came  to  Monroe  County,  Mo.,  with  her  parents  where  she  was  reared  and 
educated.  Mr.  Capp  has  three  grandchildren,  Emma  Leta,  William 
Augusta  and  Richard  Capp  Ensen. 

Mr.  Capp  is  one  of  the  progressive  citizens  of  Moberly  and  takes 
an  active  part  in  any  movement,  the  object  of  which  is  for  the  better- 
ment of  the  community  and  the  building  up  of  Randolph  County.  He  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  for  50  years  and  been 
trustee  and  a  member  of  the  board  of  stewards  of  his  church  at  Moberly 
for  30  years.     He  is  a  member  of  the  National  Union. 

Gustave  Freysleben,  who  is  successfully  engaged  in  the  meat  busi- 
ness at  209  Reed  street  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  progressive  business 
men  of  Moberly.  Mr.  Freysleben  began  business  in  this  city  in  1902. 
He  came  here  from  San  Diego,  Calif.,  where  he  had  spent  32  years.  He 
came  to  Moberly  an  absolute  stranger  and  by  his  straightforward  methods 
and  fair  dealings,  it  was  not  long  until  he  had  permanently  established 
himself  in  the  business  affairs  of  this  city  and  had  acquired  an  extensive 
acquaintance. 

Mr.  Freysleben  is  a  native  of  Illinois  and  a  son  of  Gustave  Freys- 
leben, who  in  the  prime  of  manhood,  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Union 
Army  during  the  Civil  War,  becoming  a  member  of  the  44th  Illinois  Volun- 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  309 

teer.  Infantry.  He  enlisted  as  a  private  and  in  the  course  of  his  military 
career  rose  to  the  rank  of  major.  During  the  last  few  months  of  the 
war,  he  was  severely  wounded  and  returned  to  his  home  in  Chicago  where 
he  died  shortly  afterwards  from  the  effect  of  his  wounds.  His  wife  died 
about  a  year  prior  to  the  death  of  her  husband.  Gustave  Freysleben,  the 
subject  of  this  sketch,  and  three  other  children  were  left  orphans.  The 
other  three  children  were  Fred,  Louis  and  Elizabeth,  whose  present 
whereabouts  are  unknown.  Mr.  Freysleben  has  made  every  effort  in 
years  past  to  locate  his  brothers  and  sister  through  newspaper  advertis- 
ing and  other  efforts  without  avail. 

Mr.  Freysleben  was  about  seven  years  old  when  his  parents  died 
and  when  he  was  about  ten  years  of  age,  he  beg^  work  in  a  butcher  shop 
in  Chicago  at  the  corner  of  12th  street  and  Central  avenue.  He  learned 
the  butcher  business  by  hard  work  and  close  application  to  the  business. 
Life  came  to  him  as  a  stern  reality  at  an  early  age  and  he  obtained  a 
good  practical  business  education  in  the  hard  school  of  experience  and 
there  laid  the  foundation  for  his  subsequent  successful  career. 

Mr.  Freysleben  was  united  in  marriage  at  San  Diego,  Calif,  in  1901 
to  Miss  Katherine  Held.  She  is  a  native  of  Moberly  and  a  daughter  of 
the  late  John  Held  who  was  a  well  known  prioeer  citizen  of  Moberly  and 
Randolph  County. 

Mr.  Freysleben  has  a  pleasant  home  at  807  West  Eeed  street.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles  and  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks.     He  is  one  of  Moberly's  substantial  citizens. 

Lee  Galbreath,  a  leading  druggist  of  Moberly,  located  at  109  East 
Coates  street  is  one  of  the  progressive  business  men  of  Randolph  County. 
Mr.  Galbreath  is  a  native  of  this  county,  bom  in  Prairie  township,  Nov. 
19,  1867.  He  is  a  son  of  Robert  P.  and  Sarah  Agnes  (Dulaney)  Gal- 
breath. 

Robert  P. -Galbreath  is  also  a  native  of  Randolph  County  and  was 
born  Nov.  19,  1844.  He  was  a  son  of  James  Galbreath,  a  native  of  Vir- 
ginia, who  was  among  the  very  first  settlers  of  Randolph  County  and 
entered  land  in  Prairie  township  where  Robert  P.  was  reared.  He  was 
here  long  before  Moberly  was  even  thought  of  and  was  in  attendance  at 
the  first  sale  of  city  lots  held  in  Moberly.  Robert  P.  Galbreath  served 
in  the  Confederate  Army  during  the  Civil  War  for  two  years.  His  wife, 
who  bore  the  maiden  name,  Sarah  Agnes  Dulaney,  was  born  in  Audrain 
County  of  pioneer  parents.    Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robert  P.  Galbreath  reside  at 


310  HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

218  S.  Moiiey  street,  Moberly.  They  are  the  parents  of  the  following 
children:  Lee,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Agnes,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Lillian,  married  Alvin  Walkup,  Oklahoma  City,  Okla. ;  Lenos,  Oklahoma 
City,  Okla.  and  Addie  married  W.  B.  Blaine,  Moberly. 

Lee  Galbreath  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Prairie  township  and 
attended  the  public  schools.  He  followed  farming  until  1900,  when  he 
entered  the  drug  business  at  Clark,  Mo.,  and  for  15  years  successfully  con- 
ducted a  drug  store  at  that  place.  In  1915  he  sold  his  Clark  store  to  W. 
G.  Cleeton  of  Higbee.  He  then  came  to  Moberly  and  purchased  the  J.  B. 
Hubbard  Drug  Store  and  since  that  time  has  conducted  the  store  at  the 
old  stand,  109  East  Coates  street.  He  carries  a  complete  line  of  drugs 
and  druggist's  sundries  usually  found  in  a  first  class  drug  store. 

Mr.  Galbreath  was  married  Dec.  24,  1890  to  Miss  Mirian  A.  Owings 
of  Audrain  County.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Joann  Owings. 
The  mother  is  deceased  and  Mr.  Owings  resides  at  Clark,  Mo.  To  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Galbreath  has  been  born  one  son,  Ray,  who  is  29  years  old. 
He  married  Nadine  Marshal  and  they  reside  in  Moberly. 

Mr.  Galbreath  has  always  taken  a  commendable  interest  in  local 
institutions  and  public  affairs  and  while  a  resident  of  Clark  he  served  on 
the  city  council  and  was  also  a  member  of  the  school  board.  In  1914,  he 
■was  a  candidate  for  nomination  for  the  office  of  probate  judge  and  was 
defeated  by  the  narrow  margin  of  13  votes. 

Edward  T.  Baird,  who  is  engaged  in  the  second-hand  clothing  busi- 
ness at  529  Reed  street,  is  a  descendant  of  a  pioneer  Missouri  family. 
He  was  born  in  Adair  County,  July  8,  1877,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and 
Susan  (Redding)  Baird.  John  Baird  was  also  a  native  6f  Adair  County 
and  was  a  son  of  William  Baird. 

William  Baird  was  among  the  first  settlers  of  Adair  County.  He 
served  in  the  Union  Army  during  the  Civil  War,  and  is  now  at  the 
National  Soldiers'  Home  at  Leavenworth,  Kan.,  and  is  in  his  97th  year. 
He  was  born  in  Kentucky  and  upon  locating  in  Adair  County,  Mc,  much 
of  the  land  in  that  section,  or  nearly  all,  was  government  land,  and  he 
entered  a  farm  from  the  government,  and  for  a  number  of  years,  fol- 
lowed farming.  John  Baird,  father  of  Edward  T.  Baird,  died  in  1880, 
and  his  remains  are  buried  at  Winchester,  Kan.  His  wife  survived  him 
for  a  number  of  years  and  died  in  1902.  They  were  the  parents  of  two 
children;  Mrs.  Jennie ' Williams,  who  died  at  Trenton,  Mo.:  and  Edward 
T.  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  311 

Edward  T.  Baird  was  educated  in  the  public  school  at  Humphrey, 
Mo.  and  for  a  number  of  years  was  engaged  in  the  restaurant  and  hotel 
business  in  Nebraska  and  South  Dakota,  and  for  a  time  conducted  a  hotel 
at  Novinger,  Mo.,  and  later  the  depot  restaurant  there.  For  a  number 
of  years,  he  has  made  a  specialty  of  buying  and  selling  hotels  and  restau- 
rants and  carried  this  line  of  business  on  in  a  way  which  proved  very 
profitable.  He  bought  the  Purity  Candy  Shop  and  Restaurant  at  Moberly, 
which  he  owned  a  short  time  and  sold  it  in  March,  1919.  He  came  to  Mo- 
berly September,  1918,  and  engaged  in  his  present  business. 

Mr.  Baird  was  married  in  1900  to  Grace  Vaul  of  Kirksville,  Mo.,  and 
two  children  have  been  born  to  this  union ;  Ray  C,  a  student  in  the  Mob- 
erly Business  College ;  and  Estella  V.,  Kirksville,  Mo. 

Mr.  Baird  is  a  progressive  business  man,  who  has  had  a  varied  experi- 
ence and  has  met  with  uniform  success. 

Houston  Mathews,  now  living  retired  at  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  and  a  member  of  one  of  the  historic  old  pioneer  families 
of  Missouri.  He  was  born  six  miles  east  of  Moberly  in  1846,  and  is  a  son 
of  Peter  H.  and  Etline  (Calloway)  Mathews.  Etline  Calloway  belonged 
to  the  Calloway  family  who  settled  at  Old  Franklin,  Mo.,  with  the  Boones, 
Bryants  and  Flanders  family  who  were  the  first  settlers  in  that  locality. 
When  she  was  a  child,  Etline  Calloway  lived  in  the  old  fort  which  was 
built  at  Old  Franklin  for  protection  against  hostile  Indians.  She  was 
born  in  1819  and  died  in  1905,  and  her  remains  were  buried  in  Oakland 
Cemetery. 

Peter  H.  Mathews  was  bom  near  Nashville,  Tenn.,  in  1817.  He  was 
a  son  of  William  Mathews,  who  was  an  officer  in  the  War  of  1812  and 
served  under  General  Jackson  as  a  captain  at  the  battle  of  New  Orleans, 
and  he  is  buried  in  the  same  cemetery  where  Andrew  Jackson  was  buried. 
William  Mathew's  father  was  a  Revolutionary  soldier  and  served  under 
Washington.  William  Mathews,  grandfather  of  Houston  Mathews,  mar- 
ried Betsey  Hontas,  who  was  a  neice  of  Pocahontas.  Dr.  Tennessee 
Mathews  an  uncle  of  Houston  Mathews,  who  was  born  at  Dixon  Springs, 
Smith  County,  Tenn.,  Oct.  12,  1810,  and  died  Feb.  15,  1887,  was  a  grand- 
son of  the  Mathews  who  with  the  Emetts  and  O'Connels,  were  the  found- 
ers of  the  United  Irishmen.  His  name  was  Alexander  Mathews  and  he 
settled  at  Jeflferson  City,  Mo.  and  died  there. 

To  Peter  H.  and  Etline  (Calloway)  Mathews  were  born  the  following 
children:     J.  G.,  was  bom  in  Tennessee  and  is  now  deceased;  Ruth,  died 


312  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

in  1842;  Mrs.  Fannie  Irons,  Decatur,  111.;  Houston,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Mrs.  Mary  Weed,  deceased;  William,  deceased;  and  Mrs.  Mattie 
Stidger,  deceased. 

Houston  Mathews  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  received  his 
education  in  an  old  log  school  house  of  the  early  day  primitive  type  which 
stood  just  east  of  Moberly  for  many  years.  When  a  boy  Mr.  Mathews 
worked  on  farms,  mills  and  followed  lumbering  and  in  1866  he  came  to 
Moberly.  This  was  about  the  time  the  town  was  platted  and  the  first 
sale  of  lots  was  taking  place.  After  that  Mr.  Mathews  went  to  Texas 
and  in  1870  returned  to  Moberly.  In  1875,  he  went  to  the  Black  Hills 
and  to  California,  returning  to  Moberly  the  same  year.  He  then  worked 
for  Woods  and  Aller  as  a  bartender  for  a  time  and  in  1878  bought  their 
business,  which  he    jnducted  until  July,  1918. 

Mr.  Mathews  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
•Elks. 

Theodore  Fred  Busch,  a  locomotive  engineer  on  the  Wabash  Railroad, 
has  been  in  the  employ  of  this  company  since  1897,  and  is  one  of  its 
trusted  employees  and  a  well  known  representative  citizen  of  Moberly 
and  Randolph  County.  Mr.  Busch  was  born  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Nov.  27, 
1873,  and  is  a  son  of  Ferdinand  and  Elizabeth  Busch,  both  natives  of 
Germany.  The  father  was  bom  in  Calendhart  and  came  to  the  United 
States  in  early  life,  settling  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.  He  was  a  foundryman  and 
was  employed  with  one  company  in  St.  Louis  for  18  years.  He  died  in 
city  in  1894.  His  wife  came  to  this  country  when  a  young  woman  and 
they  were  married  in  St.  Louis.  She  died  in  St.  Louis,  March  10,  1915. 
They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Mrs.  Clara  Roenmeyer, 
of  St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Theodore  Fred,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  and  Joseph 
and  Fred,  both  of  whom  are  now  living  in  St.  Louis. 

Theodore  Fred  Busch  was  reared  in  the  city  of  St.  Louis  and  at- 
tended the  parochial  schools.  When  he  was  15  years  of  age,  he  begarf 
work  as  press-boy  in  his  uncle's  factory  in  St.  Louis  and  was  employed 
there  for  a  period  of  three  years.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Felber  Machine  Company  and  was  with  that  concern  for  three  years, 
when  he  returned  to  the  employ  of  his  uncle,  where  he  was  engaged  in 
making  chemical  engines  for  a  time.  He  then  went  to  work  for  the 
Meyrose  Lamp  Manufacturing  Company,  where  he  was  employed  until 
1897,  when  he  began  his  railroading  career.  He  entered  the  employ 
of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  as  fireman  with  headquarters  at  Mo- 


THEODORE  F.  BUSCH 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  313 

berly.  In  1903,  he  was  promoted  to  freight  engineer  and  has  been  en- 
gaged in  that  capacity  on  the  Wabash  raih'oad  to  the  present  time  and 
during  these  years  his  home  has  been  in  Moberly. 

Mr.  Busch  was  married  Oct.  10,  1900,  at  St.  Charles,  Mo.,  to  Miss 
Julia  Etling,  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Barbara  (Kemp)  Etling.  Henry 
Etling  was  born  in  St.  Charles  County,  Mo.,  and  belonged  to  a  pioneer 
family  of  that  section.  He  was  a  cabinet  maker  and  spent  his  life 
in  his  native  county,  where  he  died  in  1919,  at  the  advanced  age  of  80 
years.  His  wife  was  a  native  of  Germany  and  came  to  this  country 
when  13  years  old.  She  died  in  St.  Charles,  Mo.,  June  30,  1909.  Mrs. 
Busch  is  on€  of  the  following  children  born  to  her  parents:  John  A. 
Ferguson,  Mo.;  Daniel  E.,  Lima,  Ohio;  Mrs.  Sophie  Boschert,  St.  Charles, 
Mo.;  Joseph  H.,  St.  Charles,  Mo.;  Mrs.  Anna  Schone,  St.  Charles,  Mo.; 
Mrs.  Theodore  F.  Busch,  of  this  review;  Josephine,  St.  Charles;  Clara, 
St.  Charles;  and  Lawrence,  St.  Charles.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Theodore  Fred 
Busch  have  been  born  one  son,  Marvin  H.,  who  was  bom  in  St.  Charles, 
Mo.,  Jan.  14,  1903,  and  is  now  a  student  in  the  Moberly  High  School. 

Mr.  Busch  is  a  member  of  the  Brotherhood  of  the  Locomotive  Engi- 
neers and  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  The  Busch  family  worship  at  the 
Catholic  church.  Mrs.  Busch  is  a  member  of  the  Ladies'  Auxiliary  of  the 
Brotherhood  of  the  Locomotive  Engineers  and  the  Busch  family  is  well 
and  favorably  known  in  Moberly. 

Otto  H.  Fort,  of  the  Fort  Grocery  Company,  119-121  East  Coates 
street,  Moberly,  was  bom  at  Danville,  Mo.,  and  is  a  son  of  William  Bart- 
lett  and  Jane  (Welbum)  Fort.  The  father  was  born  in  Audrain  County, 
Mo.,  Dec.  25,  1833,  and  died  at  Danville,  Mo.,  in  1901.  The  mother  was 
born  in  Callaway  County  in  1839  and  died  at  Danville,  1877.  They  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Otto  H.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch; 
Thaddeus  S.,  resides  in  Washington  state;  Jesse,  deceased;  F^ed  B.,  lives 
in  St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Emil,  was  killed  in  an  accident  at  LaPlata,  Mo.,  Aug. 
28,  1896;  Mrs.  Elvira  Powell  was  the  wife  of  Shelor  F.  Powell,  of  Dan- 
ville, Mo.,  and  is  now  deceased;  Annie  E.,  married  J.  C.  Crause,  Moberly, 
Mo. 

Otto  H.  Fort  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Danville,  Mo., 
and  the  Robinson  College.  He  has  made  his  own  way  since  he  was  15 
years  old,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  took  an  office  with  I.  B.  Porter, 
and  engaged  in  the  real  estate  and  insurance  business.  He  remained 
with  this  firm  until  1886,  when  he  and  J.  L.  Vroom  bought  out  the'  fii-m 


314  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

and  two  years  later  they  dissolved  partnership,  Mr.  Fort  continuing  the 
business  until  1892,  when  he  disposed  of  his  real  estate  business,  and 
went  with  a  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Company.  He  has  successfully  con- 
tinued the  insurance  business  until  the  present  time.  Oct.  20,  1919,  Mr. 
Fort  engaged  in  the  grocery  business,  in  partnership  with  Howard  E. 
Brockman.     However,  he  continued  to  carry  on  the  insurance  business. 

Mr.  Fort  was  married  April  26,  1888  to  Miss  Mattie  R.  Burkholder, 
daughter  of  Judge  J.  H.  Burkholder,  who  was  well  known  and  prominent 
in  Moberly  and  Randolph  County  and  who  died  in  Kentucky  about  1911 
and  his  widow  now  resides  in  Tennessee.  To  Otto  H.  and  Mattie  R. 
(Burkholder)  Fort  was  born  one  son,  Harold,  who  was  born  June  3,  1890. 
He  was  educated  in  Moberly  and  was  graduated  from  the  Moberly  High 
School.  Mr.  Fort's  first  wife  died  March  13,  1903,  and  on  Dec.  12,  1904, 
he  was  married  to  OUie  Peirce,  a  daughter  of  John  H.  Peirce,  of  Moberly, 
Mo.,  and  to  this, union  the  following  children  were  born:  Virginia  A., 
married  H.  E.  Brockman  of  Moberly;  Dorothy  B.  married  John  C.  Goetze, 
cashier  in  the  Fort  Grocery  Store ;  Thelma  M.,  married  Willima  E.  Fennel, 
Jr. ;  Leah  Mae,  a  student  in  the  Moberly  High  School,  and  Otto  E. 

Mr.  Fort  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge,  the  Benevolent  and  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks,  and  Knights  of  Pythias.  The  Fort  family  are 
members  of  the  Episcopal  church. 

Ira  F.  Harlan,  M.  D.,  former  owner  and  manager  of  the  Harlan  Cigar 
and  Tobacco  Company,  located  at  223  N.  Clark  street,  Moberly,  Mo.,  has 
been  one  of  the  progressive  and  well  known  business  men  of  this  city  for 
over  a  decade  and  a  half  and  during  that  period  has  earned  a  place  of  high 
standing  in  the  community.  Doctor  Harlan  was  bom  at  Kirksville,  Mo., 
Oct.  2,  1871,  the  son  of  Ira  G.  and  Nancy  (Nicholas)  Harlan,  both  natives 
of  Adair  County,  Mo.,  where  they  were  reared,  educated  and  later  met 
and  married  in  1868.  Ira  G.  Harlan,  after  reaching  maturity  became  a 
merchant  and  was  engaged  in  that  business  in  Kirksville. 

There  were  four  children  in  the  Harlan  family :  M.  M.,  deceased ;  L. 
E.,  working  for  the  Missouri  Pacific  Railroad  at  Denver,  Colo.;  D.  R., 
Kellogg,  Idaho,  and  Ira  F.,  the  subject  of  this  review.  The  children  spent 
their  childhood  and  early  youth  in  Kirksville  and  attended  the  public 
schools  of  that  town  and  after  Ira  F.  had  completed  his  elementary  edu- 
cation he  entered  the  Barnes  Medical  College.  In  1897  he  was  granted 
the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  from  that  institution,  passed  the  state 
medical  examination.     In  the  fall  of  the  year  opened  an  office  at  Stan- 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  315 

bury,  Mo.,  where  he  began  the  practice.  Dr.  Harlan  built  up  a  good 
practice,  but  in  1904  he  decided  to  c6me  to  Moberly  and  after  locating 
in  this  city  entered  upon  a  business  closely  associated  with  medicine,  that 
of  drugs.  The  doctor  opened  a  store  at  the  corner  of  4th  and  Reed 
streets,  where  he  soon  became  recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  business 
men  in  his  line.  He  carried  an  up-to-date  stock,  paid  strict  attention  to 
the  prescription  business,  catered  to  the  present  day  demands  of  a  drug- 
gist and  had  a  satisfactory  business.  He  sold  his  business  to  Rucker 
Brothers  in  1911.  He  then  engaged  in  the  retail  and  wholesale  cigar 
business.  Doctor  Harlan  is  on  the  road  himself  doing  his  own  selling  to 
the  retailers  of  this  section.  He  is  a  man  of  genial  presence,  pays  strict 
attention  to  the  business,  has  many  good  friends  and  is  considered  one 
of  the  best  commercial  men  of  this  section  of  the  state.  Year  by  year 
his  wholesale  business  grew  and  in  1920  he  sold  out  and  is  moving  to 
California. 

In  1902,  Doctor  Harlan  married  Miss  Ethel  G.  Ross,  of  Stansbury, 
Mo.,  the  daughter  of  John  A.  and  Martha  (Howell)  Ross.  The  father  is 
now  deceased  and  the  mother  resides  at  Stanbury.  Two  children  were 
born  to  this  union:  Martha  Ann,  at  home  and  Ross,  who  died  in  his  14th 
year,  Nov.  30,  1918. 

Dr.  Harlan  is  one  of  the  popular  men  of  Moberly  who  supports  all 
progressive  movements.  He  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  Shriner 
and  belongs  to  the  Elks,  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the 
Modem  Woodmen,  the  Yeomen  and  the  Travelers  Protective  Association. 
He  served  as  mayor  of  Moberly  two  terms.  He  was  elected  in  1915  on 
the  Democratic  ticket.  The  present  fire  department  was  inaugurated 
under  his  administration  and  additional  improvements  to  city  water 
works  made. 

Randolph  County  Trust  Company,  one  of  the  leading  banking  and 
commercial  institutions  of  central  Missouri,  was  organized  Aug.  18,  1919 
and  opened  its  doors  for  business  Dec.  4,  1919,  with  a  paid  up  capital 
stock  of  $100,000  and  now  has  a  surplus  of  $10,000  and  deposits  of 
$275,000.  Charles  C.  Hon  is  president,  0.  0.  Ash,  vice-president  and  G. 
P.  Eddings,  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  directors  are  the  above  officials 
and  T.  C.  Hall,  E.  F.  Gutekunst,  "Virgil  Packwood  and  Clem  Nelson. 
Charles  C.  Hon,  T.  C.  Hall  and  G.  P.  Eddings  were  the  moving  spirits  in 
the  organization  of  the  trust  company.  The  trust  company  is  housed 
in  a  handsome  building  at  the  corner  of  Williams  and  Reed  streets. 


316  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Charles  C.  Hon,  for  many  years  identified  with  the  banking  and 
financial  interests  of  Randolph  County,  is  a  Missourian,  born  near  Belton, 
Cass  County,  Sept.  23,  1878,  the  son  of  J.  V.  and  Emma  E.  (Parrott)  Hon. 
The  father  was  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  setled  in  Cass  County  in  1856, 
wiiere  he  bought  land  and  later  became  a  man  of  prominence.  He  early 
began  breeding  high  grade  Hereford  cattle  and  in  later  years  entered  the 
realms  of  finance  as  he  is  a  heavy  stockholder  and  vice-president  of  the 
Pleasant  Hill  Banking,     'the  mother  is  deceased. 

Charles  C.  Hon  remained  on  his  father's  farm  near  Pleasant  Hill 
until  ten  years  of  age.  He  received  his  elementary  education  in  the 
Pleasant  Hill  school  and  later  graduated  from  the  high  school  there. 
Soon  after  completing  his  education  he  began  his  career  by  entering  the 
bank  at  Pleasant  Hill  and  later  accepted  a  position  with  the  Citizens 
Bank  of  that  town.  He  had  already  entered  public  life  by  being  elected 
and  serving  one  term  on  the  city  council.  In  1905,  Mr.  Hon  was  candi- 
date on  the  Democratic  ticket  for  county  clerk  and  the  next  year  he  spent 
in  Oklahoma  in  the  banking  business.  On  his  return  to  Missouri  in  1907, 
he  was  made  cashier  of  the  Citizens  Bank  of  Higbee.  He  bought  a  con- 
trolling interest  in  the  stock  of  the  bank  and  was  the  directing  influence 
of  its  policies.  While  at  Higbee,  Mr.  Hon  served  as  vice-chairman  of  the 
Randolph  County  Liberty  Loan  Committee  during  the  raising  of  the 
2nd,  3rd  and  4th  Liberty  Loans.  "He  also  served  as  chairman  of  the  2nd 
Red  Cross  drive  in  Moniteau  township  and  as  county  chairman  of  Ran- 
dolph County  for  the  5th  or  Victory  Loan,  when  it  was  necessary  to 
raise  $760,000.  Mr.  Hon  located  in  Moberly  in  November,  1919,  and  since 
assuming  his  oflScial  position  with  the  banking  house  all  his  time  and 
energies  have  been  devoted  to  the  various  demands  of  his  business. 

In  June,  1910,  Mr.  Hon  married  Miss  Carrie  W.  Tymony,  the  daugh- 
ter of  James  B.  and  Binda  (Burton)  Tymony.  The  father  is  a  druggist 
of  St.  Louis,  though  bom  and  reared  in  Randolph  County,  being  the  son 
of  Francis  M.  Tymony',  an  early  settler  near  Higbee,  who  was  prominent 
in  county  and  state  politics  and  also  was  of  a  literary  turn  of  mind  as 
he  wrote  a  poem,  "Remember  the  Poor,"  which  will  be  recalled  by  many 
of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  this  section. 

George  P.  Eddings,  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Randolph  County 
Trust  Company,  has  been  identified  with  the  financial  and  banking  inter- 
ests of  Randolph  County  for  more  than  15  years  and  during  that  time 
has  honestly  won  a  high  place  in  the  esteem  of  the  residents  of  this  sec- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  317 

tion.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County,  born  on  a  farm  four  miles 
southwest  of  Moberly,  Dec.  16,  1880.  He  is  the  son  of  William  and 
Moline  (Patton)  Eddings,  both  in  Moberly.  For  many  years  he  was  en- 
gaged in  farming  and  later  lived  in  Moberly,  where  he  was  engaged  in 
the  real  estate  business,  but  some  ten  years  ago  retired.  Moline  (Pat- 
ton)  Eddings  was  born  on  the  same  farm  as  her  son,  George  P.,  in  1857, 
and  died  in  1908  and  was  buried  in  Oakland  Cemetery.  She  was  the 
daughter  of  George  and  Lucy  Ann  (Melton)  Patton,  both  of  whom  were 
born  and  spent  their  youth  in  Kentucky  and  after  their  marriage  be- 
came pioneer  settlers  of  Salt  Springs  township,  Randolph  County,  spend- 
ing their  lives  there.  Theopolis  Eddings,  George  Eddings,  paternal  grand- 
father, came  to  Kentucky  and  settled  south  of  Huntsville  on  a  farm  at 
a  very  early  date  and  lived  there  until  his  death. 

George  P.  Eddings  received  his  educational  advantages  in  the  public 
schools  of  Moberly,  graduating  from  the  high  school  in  1900  and  the 
next  year  entered  the  Bank  of  Moberly  as  a  bookkeeper.  He  was  rapidly 
advanced  from  one  position  of  trdst  to  another  so  that  when  he  resigned 
from  the  bank  in  1916  he  was  assistant  cashier.  For  three  years,  follow- 
ing his  resignation,  Mr.  Eddings  was  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business 
here;  then  in  association  with  Charles  Hon,  he  became  one  of  the  prime 
movers  in  the  establishment  and  organization  of  the  Randolph  Trust 
Company,  becoming  its  secretary  and  treasurer  when  the  company  was 
organized. 

Aug.  21,  1911,  Mr.  Eddings  married  Miss  Ethel  Bradley,  of  Arm- 
strong, Mo.,  the  daughter  of  George  and  Lillie  Bradley  and  one  child 
has  been  born  to  them,  Moline  Patton.  The  Eddings  family  home  is  at 
629  South  Williams  street.  Mr.  Eddings  is  a  Mason.  He  is  progressive 
and  ever  ready  to  help  in  the  promotion  of  every  movement  that  tends  to 
the  development  and  improvement  of  Randolph  County  and  the  city  of 
Moberly. 

Edward  C.  Short  and  Patrick  J.  Short,  who  for  more  than  30  years 
have  been  well  known  business  men  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  are  substantial  citi- 
zens of  this  city.  The  Short  brothers  were  bom  in  St.  Charles,  Mo., 
Edward  C,  in  1866,  and  Patrick,  in  1868,  and  are  the  sons  of  Edward  and 
Ann  (Walsh)  Short,  both  natives  of  County  Limerick,  Ireland,  who  came 
to  America  in  1859.  In  1879  Edward  Short  came  to  Moberly  to  enter 
the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company,  being  assigned  to  work 
in  the  shops.    The  mother  spent  most  of  her  life  in  Randolph  County  and 


318  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY*, 

died  here  in  1886,  being  sui-vived  by  her  husband  until  1902,  when  he 
too  passed  away  and  their  remains  were  placed  in  St.  Mary's  Cemetery. 

There  were  nine  children  born  to  Edward  Short  and  wife:  John,  de- 
ceased ;  Michael,  an  engineer  on  the  Wabash  Railroad,  married  Kate  Burke, 
of  Moberly ;  Catharine,  Mary  and  Anna  all  living  in  Moberly ;  Edward  and 
Patrick  of  this  review;  Thomas,  of  Prescott,  Arizona,  married  Catharine 
Schnell,  and  William,  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  in  Moberly,  who 
married  Nora  O'Connell,  the  daughter  of  Judge  Benjamin  O'Connell  and 
they  have  two  sons,  Edward  and  Wilbur. 

Edward  and  Patrick  Short  were  reared  in  Moberly  and  attended  the 
public  and  parochial  schools  and  Patrick  took  a  course  in  the  Moberly 
Business  College.  In  March,  1891,  they  engaged  in  the  saloon  business  at 
320  West  Coates  street,  where  they  became  well  and  faborably  known. 

In  1898  Patrick  Short  married  Miss  Catharine  Sours,  of  Moberly,  the 
daughter  of  John  and  Catharine  Sours,  both  deceased.  Two  daughters 
were  born  to  this  union:  Catharine  and  Frances.  Edward  C.  Short  is 
unmarried  and  makes  his  home  with  his  sisters  at  515  Logan  street  and 
Patrick  G.  Short  resides  at  323  Hagood  street.  Edward  C,  Patrick  G. 
and  William,  are  all  members  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks. 

For  many  years  the  Short  family  has  been  recognized  as  one  of  the 
substantial  ones  of  the  community;  its  members  are  progressive  and  lib- 
eral to  any  laudable  cause  for  the  benefit  of  Moberly. 

William  J.  Short  and  Bert  Shearer,  leading  grocers  of  Moberly,  rank 
among  the  progressive  and  prosperous  men  of  the  city,  with  a  store  at  112 
North  4th  street,  where  they  began  business  July  21,  1913. 

■William  J.  Short  was  born  in  Mexico  in  1877,  the  son  of  Edward  and 
Anna  (Walsh)  Short,  both  natives  of  Ireland.  In  1879,  the  Short  family 
located  in  Moberly  as  the  father  had  accepted  a  position  with  the  Wabash 
Railroad  Company  and  the  parents  spent  the  rest  of  their  lives  here  and 
are  buried  in  St.  Marys  cemetery. 

William  J.  Short  attended  the  public  schools  of  Moberly.  He  then 
entered  the  Faessler  machine  shops,  learned  the  trade  of  machinist  and 
remained  with  that  concern  for  eight  years.  In  1909  he  was  elected  col- 
lector of  the  city  of  Moberly  and  was  reelected  in  1911,  serving  four  years. 
At  the  expiration  of  his  term  of  office,  Mr.  Short  engaged  in  the  grocery ' 
business  with  Mr.  Shearer  and  has  continued  in  the  store  to  the  present 
time. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  319 

In  1904,  Mr.  Short  married  Miss  Nora  O^'Connell,  of  Moberly.  She  is 
the  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Mary  (Hurley)  O'Connell,  both  natives  of 
Ireland.  They  came  to  Moberly  in  1875  and  Mr.  O'Connell  has  taken  an 
active  part  in  the  development  of  this  section.  He  helped  build  the  first 
telegraph  line  from  Macon  to  Moberly.  He  was  then  employed  by  the 
Wabash  Railroad  Company  in  the  car  department.  He  retired  in  1918. 
Mr.  O'Connell  was  police  judge  of  Moberly  for  six  years,  from  1907  to  1913, 
and  was  a  capable  officer.  Two  sons  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Short: 
Edward  and  Wilbur,  both  at  home. 

Mr.  Short  has  taken  an  active  part  in  the  civic  life  of  Moberly  and 
has  prompted  many  of  the  progressive  movements  here.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Court  of  Honor,  the  Yeomen,  the  National  Union  and  the  Machinists' 
Union,  having  served  as  financial  secretary  of  the  latter  four  years. 

Bert  Shearer,  the  junior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Short  &  Shearer,  was 
born  at  Renick,  Randolph  County,  Jan.  11,  1884,  and  is  a  son  of  A.  H. 
and  Laura  V.  (Mitchell)  Shearer,  both  now  deceased.  The  father  was 
a  native  of  Butler  County,  Pa.  and  died  in  Missouri  in  1918  and  the  mother 
was  born  in  Missouri  and  died  in  1910.  Both  are  buried  in  Oakland 
cemetery.  A.  H.  Shearer  came  to  Renick  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century 
ago  and  was  a  contractor  there  for  some  years.  He  then  worked  for  the 
Williams  Wagon  Factory  until  the  family  moved  to  Moberly  in  1900. 
There  were  live  children  in  the  Shearer  family:  Bessie,  the  wife  of  E.  L. 
Patterson,  of  Moberly;  Bert,  of  this  review;  Lucille,  the  wife  of  B.  G. 
Englen,  of  Moberly;  Merle  H.,  of  Madison,  S.  D.,  and  Reba,  a  teacher  in 
the  Moberly  schools. 

Bert  Shearer  was  reared  in  Renick,  attended  the  public  schools  and 
later  the  Moberly  high  school.  After  leaving  school  he  accepted  a  position 
with  J.  S.  Bowers  &  Son,  remaining  with  that  concern  10  years.  He  then 
formed  the  partnership  with  Mr.  Short  in  the  grocery  business. 

June  26,  1905,  Mr.  Shearer  was  married  to  Miss  Anna  Maud  Bradley, 
a  daughter  of  E.  T.  Bradley,  of  Sugar  Creek  township  and  one  child  has 
been  born  to  them,  Juanita  Maud.  The  Shearer  family  have  a  modern 
home  at  703  S.  Fifth  street.  Mr.  Shearer  is  a  member  of  the  Knights 
and  Ladies  of  Security  and  the  Modern  Woodmen. 

John  H.  Coatefe,  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of 
Randolph  County,  that  played  an  important  part  in  the  development  and 
settlement  of  this  county  and  central  Missouri,  is  a  native  son  of  Moberly. 
He  was  born  Sept.  30,  1899  and  is  the  son  of  T.  D.  and  Eleanor  (Yeager) 


320  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Coates,  both  of  whom  now  live  in  Prairie  township,  Randolph  County. 
The  father  was  born  in  Moberly  in  1855  and  is  the  son  of  Tunsel  Coates, 
a  native  of  Kentucky  and  early  settler  of  Sugar  Creek  township,  this 
county,  where  he  died  in  1919.  Eleanor  Yeager  Coates  was  born  near 
Higbee,  in  1864,  was  reared  and  educated  in  Randolph  County  and  later 
met  her  husband  here,  being  married  in  the  same  locality. 

John  H.  Coates  was  the  only  child  of  his  parents.  He  attended  the 
public  schools  and  after  graduating  from  the  high  school  in  1918,  entered 
the  Student  Army  Training  Corps  of  Central  College,  Fayette,  Mo.,  Oct. 
2,  1918  and  remained  there  until  Dec.  11,  1918,  when  the  corps  was  dis- 
banded. On  his  return  to  Moberly  Mr.  Coates  resumed  his  position  with 
the  Cross  Lumber  Company,  as  bookkeeper,  an  association  which  has 
continued. 

He  is  a  member  of  the  American  Legion  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  of 
Moberly. 

James  C.  Enslen^  a  well-known  passenger  conductor  of  the  Wabash 
railroad,  has  been  in  the  employ  of  this  company  for  30  years,  and  dur- 
ing that  time  Moberly  has  been  his  home.  He  was  born  in  Audrain 
County,  near  Wellsville,  Mo.  He  is  the  son  of  George  W.  and  Mary  J. 
(Clayton)  Enslen.  George  W.  Enslen  was  also  a  native  of  Missouri, 
bom  on  a  farm  in  Audrain  County,  where  he  was  engaged  in  farming 
throughout  his  active  career.  In  later  life  he  retired  and  moved  to  Wells- 
ville, where  he  died.  He  was  a  descendant  of  very  early  pioneers  of  this 
state.  During  the  Civil  War  he  served  in  the  Missouri  State  Militia. 
His  wife,  Mary  J.  Enslen,  was  bom  in  Pike  County,  Mo.,  and  was  a 
daughter  of  F.  C.  Clayton.  She  died  in  Moberly  in  1908.  They  were  the 
parents  of  the  following  children:  James  C,  the  subject  of  this  sketch; 
Mrs.  J.  W.  Ingram,  Moberly;  LiUie  S.,  deceased,  and  J.  W.,  lives  in 
Moberly. 

James  C.  Ensley  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Audrain  County 
and  was  educated  in  the  public  schools.  He  remained  at  home  on  the 
farm  until  he  was  21  years  of  age,  when  on  account  of  failing  health, 
he  went  to  Califomia  and  followed  ranch  life  for  a  time.  In  1886,  he 
went  to  Colorado,  where  he  began  his  railroad  career  as  a  brakeman 
in  the  employ  of  the  Santa  Fe  Railroad  Company.  Two  years  later  he 
went  with  the  Denver  and  Rio  Grande.  In  1890,  he  returned  to  Missouri 
and  settled  in  Moberly,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash 
Railroad  Company  as  brakeman.     In  1892,  he  was  promoted  to  freight 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  321 

conductor  and  in  1899  was  promoted  to  passenger  conductor,  a  position 
which  he  has  held  on  this  road  for  the  past  21  years,  and  is  now  on 
Moberly  Division. 

Mr.  Enslen  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Foster,  a  native  of  Dallas 
City,  111.,  bom  Nov.  23,  1861,  and  is  a  daughter  of  John  W.  and  Alvina 
(Stewart)  Foster.  John  W.  Foster  was  a  native  of  the  state  of  New 
York.  He  was  a  Methodist  minister  and  during  the  Civil  War,  served 
as  chaplain  in  the  Union  army  and  died  while  in  the  service.  His  wife, 
Alvina  (Stewart)  Foster,  was  bom  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  in  1840,  and  died 
in  Colorado  in  1908.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Mary  E.,  wife  of  James  C.  Enslen,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Frank, 
Emma,  George,  Carol,  Edith,  deceased ;  and  Mrs.  Lillie  Sheidow,  of  Kan- 
sas City,  Mo.  Mrs.  Enslen  and  Mrs.  Sheidow  are  the  only  living  mem- 
bers of  the  family.    Mr.  and  Mrs.  Enslen  have  no  children. 

Mr.  Enslen  is  a  Republican  and  he  and  Mrs.  Enslen  are  members 
of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Order  of  Rail- 
way Conductors  and  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  belongs  to  the 
Shrine,  Ararat  Temple,  at  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  Mrs.  Enslen  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Auxiliary  of  the  Order  of  the  Railway  Conductors  and  the 
Order  of  the  Eastern  Star. 

Morris  Bierman,  one  of  the  younger  generation  of  business  men  of 
Moberly  who  takes  an  active  part  in  the  commercial  life  of  the  city  as  a 
leading  dealer  in  furniture  and  stoves,  with  a  store  at  113  North  Wil- 
liams street,  which  was  established  under  the  name  of  Hyman  L.  and 
Rosa  Bierman,  both  natives  of  Russia,  where  they  were  born,  reared  and 
married.  Morris  Bierman  was  one  of  seven  children  born  to  hife  par- 
ents. The  others  are:  Samuel,  of  St.  Louis;  Mrs.  Lizzie  Wexler,  of  St. 
Louis;  Abe,  also  of  that  city;  Jack,  clerk  of  the  city  court  of  St.  Louis; 
and  Isaac,  his  twin  brother,  also  of  St.  Louis. 

When  Morris  Bierman  was  six  years  old,  his  mother  brought  him 
with  the  other  children  to  the  United  States,  as  the  father  had  preceeded 
them  some  time  and  already  had  a  home  prepared  for  his  family  in  St. 
Louis.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  St.  Louis.  When  his  school 
days  were  over  he  engaged  in  the  furniture  business  with  his  father. 
The  business  was  established  in  December,  1914.  From  the  first  the  new 
enterprise  met  with  success.  Mr.  Bierman  carries  a  full  line  of  furniture, 
stoves  and  household  furnishings.  His  stock  is  clean,  well  kept  and  he  is 
courteous   and    accommodating.     He   has    built   up    a   satisfactory    and 


322  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

profitable  business.  In  1916,  Morris  Bierman  purchased  his  father's 
interest  in  tlie  business  and  is  now  sole  owner  and  manager. 

Morris  Bierman  was  married  Feb.  25,  1906  to  Miss  Rebecca  Schucart, 
of  St.  Louis,  the  daughter  of  Ralph  Schucart  who  is  deceased  and  the 
mother  now  resides  at  St.  Louis.  Three  children  have  been  born  to  this 
union:  Ruth,  Ralph  and  Goldine,  all  of  whom  live  with  their  parents  a' 
the  family  home  1201  W.  Franklin  street. 

Since  first  coming  to  Moberly,  Mr.  Bierman  has  taken  an  active  part 
in  local  affairs.  He  is  a  man  of  progressive  ideas  and  believes  that  every 
citizen  should  support  the  movements  for  the  upbuilding  and  improve- 
ment of  the  city  where  he  expects  to  make  his  home.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Masonic  Lodge,  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  I.  0. 
B.  of  St.  Louis. 

The  Bierman  family  was  well  represented  in  the  World  War.  Two 
brothers,  Abe  and  Isaac  served  in  the  National  Army.  Isaac  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  138th  Infantry,  25th  Division,  under  Lieutenant  Theodore 
Bazan  and  was  wounded  in  the  same  engagement  in  which  Lieutenant 
Bazan  was  killed.  He  served  overseas  for  18  months  and  after  the  cessa- 
tion of  hostilities  was  honorably  discharged.  Abe  Bierman,  after  enter- 
ing the  service  was  assigned  to  the  quartermaster's  department  as  pur- 
chasing agent  and  also  as  interpreter  of  the  French  and  Jewish  languages 
while  in  France.  He  served  for  two  and  a  half  years,  being  a  member 
of  the  forces  that  were  at  the  front  in  France  and  on  his  return  to  the 
United  States  was  honorably  discharged  from  the  army. 

Jacob  S.  Bowers,  one  of  central  Missouri's  well  known  and  most 
prosperous  business  men,  who  established  a  department  store  in  Moberly 
nearly  40  years  ago,  being  the  senior  member  of  Bowers  &  Reis,  was 
born  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  in  1850  and  died  at  Moberly  in  1917.  He  was 
reared  and  educated  in  the  East  and  after  his  school  days  were  over 
engaged  in  merchandising,  knowing  that  there  were  many  good  openings 
in  the  newer  country  to  the  West,  Mr.  Bowers  determined  to  locate  there. 
In  partnership  with  Ira  S.  Reis,  a  company  was  formed  which  opened 
the  "Trade  Palace"  of  Moberly  in  1883  at  the  location  still  occupied  by 
the  Bower's  department  store.  The  store  has  a  large  frontage  carrying 
the  street  numbers  of  210-214  Reed  street,  one  of  the  finest  locations  in 
the  city.  From  the  first  the  new  concern  met  with  a  cordial  response 
from  the  residents  of  Moberly  and  the  surrounding  territory;  business 
grew,  more  lines  were  added  and  the  Trade  Palace  became  the  center  of 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  323 

the  retail  trade  for  dry  goods,  men  and  womens  furnishings  and  childrens 
suppHes  of  all  kinds.  Later  carpets  and  drapery  departments  were  added 
to  accommodate  the  growing  trade  until  today  the  Palace  is  one  of  the 
largest  and  most  up-to-date  department  houses  in  the  middle  west.  Open- 
ing with  a  stock  valued  at  $30,000  the  business  grew  in  such  proportions 
that  today  it  is  rated  at  more  than  $100,000. 

In  1895  Jacob  Bowers  purchased  the  Reis  interest  in  the  concern  and 
since  that  time  the  business  has  been  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of 
J.  S.  Bowers  &  Son.  On  the  death  of  the  senior  member  of  the  firm, 
the  junior  member,  William  S.  Bowers,  succeeded  his  father  as  owner- 
manager  of  the  house  and  continued  the  same  successful  policies  inaugur- 
ated by  his  father.  The  widow  of  Jacob  Bowers  now  resides  at  Long 
Beach,  Calif.  From  first  coming  to  Moberly,  Jacob  Bowers  began  to  take 
an  active  part  in  the  civic  and  communal  life  of  the  town.  He  was  a  man 
of  progressive  ideas  in  his  business  and  believed  that  these  same  prin- 
ciples should  be  applied  to  the  city  administration,  and  did  much  toward 
the  development  of  the  city  of  Moberly.  For  20  years  he  served  as  a 
member  of  the  school  board,  being  president  and  treasurer  of  the  board 
and  was  an  incumbent  of  these  positions  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He 
was  an  active,  public  spirited  man,  who  lived  up  to  the  high  standard  he 
set  for  an  American  citizen,  was  well  known  among  the  educators  of  the 
state  as  a  man  who  promoted  all  educational  movements  and  had  raised 
the  standards  of  the  Moberly  schools.  During  his  life  he  won  for  him- 
self the  highest  possible  esteem  from  all  who  knew  him,  friends  and 
business  associates  alike.  With  his  passing,  Mr.  Bowers  left  to  his  son 
the  example  of  an  honorable  and  useful  life;  to  his  family  the  memory 
of  his  loving  care  as  a  husband  and  father.  His  remains  are  buried  in 
Philadelphia,  Pa. 

William  S.  Bowers,  the  only  child  of  Jacob  S.  Bowers,  was  bom  in 
Union  City,  Ind.,  in  1882,  and  accompanied  his  parents  when  they  came 
to  Missouri  a  year  later.  He  spent  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Moberly 
and  attended  the  public  schools  and  after  graduating  from  the  high, 
school  entered  the  State  University  where  he  was  graduated.  Afteil 
leaving  college,  William  Bowers  returned  to  Moberly  and  became  a  part- 
ner with  his  father  in  the  mercantile  business.  He  has  made  a  phenom- 
enal success.  The  store  has  a  frontage  of  75  feet,  depth  of  110  feet,  has 
two  floors  devoted  entirely  to  retail  display  and  30  people  are  employed. 

On  June  24,  1903,  Mr.  Bowers  married  Miss  Gertrude  Rice  of  St. 


324  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Louis.  She  is  the  daughter  of  J.  P.  and  Sophia  Rice,  of  that  city.  Mr. 
Rice  is  now  deceased  and  his  widow  lives  in  St.  Louis.  Three  children 
have  been  born  to  this  union:  Marion  and  twin  sons,  William  and  Wal- 
lace, all  at  home  with  their  parents.  Mr.  Bowers  has  taken  an  active 
part  in  the  life  of  Moberly  and  is  progressive.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Country  Club,  is  first  vicJe-president  of  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks  of  Missouri  and  is  also  district 
deputy  of  northern  Missouri  for  that  organization. 

Willis  Baugh,  one  of  the  younger  business  men  of  Moberly  who  holds 
a  responsible  position  with  the  Cross  Lumber  Company,  is  a  native  son 
of  Randolph  County,  born  in  Moberly,  July  6,  1894,  the  son  of  Charles  C. 
and  Lizzie  (Hall)  Baugh,  who  now  live  at  2211/2  N.  Clark  street.  The 
father  was  born  in  Randolph  County  in  1873  and  the  mother  in  1871.  She 
is  the  daughter  of  B.  N.  and  Mary  E.  Hall,  who  live  at  Higginsville,  Mo. 
There  were  eight  children  in  the  Baugh  family:  Willis  of  this  review; 
Willard,  of  Moberly;  Ledoew,  also  of  Moberly;  Fern,  who  married  Earl 
Rittenhouse  of  Basin,  Wyo. ;  Earl  and  Murrel,  twins,  the  former  at  home 
and  the  latter  is  in  Mason  City,  la. ;  Charles  and  Orville,  also  in  Moberly. 

Willis  Baugh  spent  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Moberly,  was  sent  to 
the  public  schools  for  his  educational  advantages  and  after  his  school  days 
were  over  took  a  position  with  the  Cross  Lumber  Company.  When  war 
was  declared  against  Germany,  he  enlisted  in  the  army  on  July  24,  1918 
and  was  sent  to  Camp  Funston  for  his  training.  Within  a  short  time  he 
was  assigned  to  Headquarters  Detachment,  10th  Field  Artillery  and  re- 
mained in  training  until  after  the  signing  of  the  armistice,  receiving  his 
honorable  discharge  Feb.  11,  1919,  after  having  been  in  the  service  six 
months.  On  his  return  to  Moberly,  Mr.  Baugh  again  assumed  his  duties 
with  the  Cross  Lumber  Company,  an  association  which  has  since  con- 
tinued. Willard  Baugh,  Willis'  brother,  was  the  second  member  of  Com- 
pany E,  70th  Infantry,  to  enlist.  He  also  was  sent  to  Camp  Funston, 
having  entered  the  army  on  the  same  day  as  his  brother.  He  was  dis- 
charged Jan.  29,  1919  and  is  now  employed  at  the  Oakland  cemetery. 
Both  the  Baugh  brothers  are  fine  young  men,  patriotic  and  public  spirited 
who  are  an  asset  to  the  citizenship  of  any  community. 

William  F.  Mangiis>  one  of  the  leading  druggists  of  Moberly  who  has 
been  in  business  here  for  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century  and  who  during 
that  time  has  done  his  part  in  the  development  of  the  city  and  its  sur- 
rounding territory.    Mr.  Mangus  was  bom  in  the  state  of  Louisiana  in 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  325 

1862,  the  son  of  Wm.  F.  and  Susan  (Terry)  Mangus,  both  natives  of  Ken- 
tucky, who  were  married  in  Saline  County,  Mo.,  in  1858.  Soon  after 
their  marriage  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mrs.  Mangus  went  to  Louisiana  to  live  and 
remained  in  the  South  until  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War.  Mr.  Mangus 
enlisted  in  the  Confederate  Army  and  served  until  peace  was  declared. 
He  served  under  Gen.  Joseph  E.  Johnson  and  was  wounded  in  the  right 
leg  by  a  minne  ball  "at  the  Battle  of  Bull  Run,  but  as  soon  as  he  was 
discharged  from  the  hospital  he  reenlisted  and  served  until  hostilities 
closed.  After  this  the  family  returned  to  Missouri,  locating  in  Saline 
County  where  they  lived  for  many  years.  Mr.  Mangus  died  in  1909  at 
the  age  of  70  years,  being  survived  by  his  wife  who  died  in  1912  and  both 
are  buried  at  Oakland  cemetery.  There  were  10  childuen  in  the  Mangus 
family:  Charles,  of  Florida;  William  F.,  of  Moberly;  Taylor  D.,  of  Mob- 
erly;  Monta,  of  Moberly;  Louise,  the  wife  of  James  Crossland,  of  Sedaha, 
Mo.;  Mary,  who  married  Luther  Stockton,  of  Perry,  Okla. ;  Susan,  now 
Mrs.  Jose  Johnson,  of  Moberly;  Ida,  the  widow  of  Mr.  Boucher,  of  Birm- 
ingham, Ala.,  and  Daisy,  who  lives  with  her  sister  at  Birmingham. 

William  F.  Mangus  was  a  small  boy  when  his  parents  returned  to 
Missouri  and  'he  attended  the  public  schools  of  Saline  County  and  Cam- 
bridge, graduating  from  the  high  school  there.  He  then  began  to  study 
telegraphy  and  became  an  operator  for  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad, 
an  association  that  continued  for  11  years.  Mr.  Mangus  was  advanced 
from  one  position  of  trust  to  another  until  he  held  a  fine  position  mth 
the  road  but  he  desired  to  engage  in  an  independent  business  for  him- 
self and  in  1891  resigned  from  the  road  and  opened  a  drug  store  at  Clark, 
Mo.  He  built  up  a  good  trade  and  being  made  a  good  offer  by  his  brother, 
sold  the  business  to  him  after  having  lived  in  that  city  for  six  years. 
Mr.  Mangus  then  located  in  Moberly  where  he  has  since  conducted  a  drug 
store  and  has  built  up  an  extensive  trade. 

On  Nov.  23,  1887,  Mr.  Mangus  was  married  to  Miss  Esther  E.  Hamil- 
ton, of  Moberly,  the  daughter  of  James  Hamilton,  a  pioneer  of  the  county 
who  died  at  the  age  of  74  years.  The  mother  lives  in  Moberly.  Two 
children  were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mangus:  William  Leon,  who  is  em- 
'ployed  by  the  John  Deere  Plow  Company  of  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  Ethel 
S.,  the  wife  of  B.  C.  Stephens  of  Moberly  and  they  have  two  children, 
Barney,  Jr.,  and  Martha.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mangus  reside  at  834  W.  Reed 
street.  Mr.  Mangus  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks. 


326  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Ray  Galbreath,  one  of  the  younger  generation  of  the  business  and 
professional  men  of  Moberly,  who  owns  and  manages  a  drug  store  at  550 
West  Coates  street,  is  a  native  of  Missouri,  bom  in  Audrain  County,  Jan. 
22,  1892,  the  son  of  Lee  and  Miriam  (Owings)  Galbreath,  both  of  whom 
now  reside  in  Moberly,  and  their  biography  appears  in  this  volume.  Ray 
Galbreath  attended  the  public  schools  of  Clark,  Mo.  and  after  graduating 
from  the  high  school,  entered  the  pharmacy  department  of  the  college  at 
Brunswick,  Mo.  He  completed  the  required  college  course  and  in  1916 
passed  the  examination  of  the  State  Board  of  Pharmacy  and  was  ad- 
mitted to  practice.  He  at  once  secured  a  position  with  the  H.  &  H.  drug 
store  in  Moberly  and  was  working  there  when  war  was  declared  against 
Germany. 

Ray  Galbreath  enlisted  July  3,  1917  in  the  medical  department  of  the 
110th  Engineers,  35th  Division,  and  as  soon  as  his  training  was  over 
was  sent  overseas  where  he  served  in  France  for  30  days  witljr  the  British 
forces.  He  then  was  assigned  to  the  French  army  for  60  days,  when  he 
was  transferred  to  the  American  First  Army.  Mr.  Galbreath  was  doing 
first  aid  work  with  the  35th  Division  and  on  Sept.  29,  1918  the  110th 
Engineers  were  ordered  to  the  front  line  trenches  where  Mr.  Galbreath 
served  with  them.  This  division  was  under  fire  from  the  enemy  from 
Sept.  26th  to  Oct.  2nd  and  saw  some  of  the  most  severe  fighting  of  the 
war.  From  this  location  in  the  first  aid  stations,  he  was  continually 
under  shell  fire  and  was  most  fortunate  to  escape  without  injury  and  with 
his  life.  He.  was  gassed  on  Sept.  30,  1918.  He  made  an  enviable  record 
in  the  danger  zone  by  bravely  attending  to  his  duties  in  the  advanced 
lines  and  upon  the  battle  field.  He  was  at  Luniville,  France,  when  the 
armistice  was  signed.  He  returned  to  the  United  States  April  4,  1919 
and  was  honorably  discharged  and  mustered  out  of  the  service  May  3, 
1919,  after  almost  two  years  of  service  in  a  foreign  land. 

Mr.  Galbreath  returned  to  Moberly  and  purchased  the  Mangus  drug 
store  on  Coates  street.  This  is  now  both  owned  and  managed  by  the 
young  druggist  who  has  continued  to  carry  on  the  same  line  of  business 
as  his  predecessor,  handling  all  lines  of  high  class  drugs  and  all  the  allied 
lines  which  the  public  has  come  to  expect  and  demand  today.  Mr.  Gal- 
breath is  a  popular  business  man  and  has  an  extensive  trade. 

On  Jan.  27,  1918,  Mr.  Galbreath  married  Miss  Nadine  Marshall,  of 
Moberly,  the  daughter  of  M.  M^  and  Hattie  (Kimbrough)  Marshall,  the 
latter  now  deceased  and  the  father  lives  in  Moberly.    Mr.  Galbreath  is  a 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  327 

charter  member  of  Theodore  Bazan  Post,  American  Legion,  of  Moberly 
and  also  belongs  to  the  Maccabees. 

W.  R.  Butler,  councilman  from  the  fourth  ward  of  Moberly  and  the 
owner-manager  of  one  of  the  leading  grocery  houses  of  the  city,  was  born 
in  Adams  County,  111.,  Oct.  21,  1871.  He  is  the  son  of  W.  J.  and  Eliza 
Jane  (Stevens)  Butler,  who  came  to  Missouri  in  1878  and  located  in  Mon- 
roe County  and  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives  there.  The  mother 
died  in  1885  and  the  father  lived  to  be  a  man  of  advanced  age.  He  was 
nearly  80  years  old  when  he  died.  W.  J.  Butler  enlisted  in  the  Union 
Army  at  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil*War  and  served  in  Company  I,  84th 
Regiment  throughout  that  memorable  conflict.  There  were  eight  chil- 
dren in  the  Butler  family:  C.  L.,  of  Moberly;  W.  A.  and  W.  R.  of  this 
review,  also  of  Moberly;  Walter  and  Solon  also  residents  of  this  city,  the 
latter  being  connected  with  the  Wabash  Railroad;  Jennie  Carney,  of  St. 
Louis ;  Bessie  Roderman,  of  Dallas,  Tex. ;  and  Hester  Freeman,  of  Flat 
River,  Mo. 

W.  R.  Butler  spent  his  boyhood  and  early  youth  in  Monroe  County, 
Mo.,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  there  and  after  his  school  days 
were  over  learned  the  barber's  trade,  a  vocation  which  he  followed  until 
he  reached  his  29th  year.  In  1915  he  engaged  in  the  grocery  business. 
From  first  opening  up  his  establishment  here  Mr.  Butler  met  with  a  warm 
response  from  the  residents.  He  has  built  up  a  fine  trade  and  is  one  of 
the  progressive  and  prosperous  men  of  the  city. 

On  April  9,  1886,  Mr.  Butler  married  Miss  Anna  Messerla,  a  native 
of  St.  Louis  County,  Mo.,  the  daughter  of  Lee  and  Margaret  (Zimmer- 
man) Messerla.  Mrs.  Butler  has  ever  been  an  encouragement  to  her 
husband  in  his  business,  takes  a  keen  and  practical  interest  in  the  grocery 
business  and  is  his  capable  and  able  assistant  in  the  store. 

From  first  locating  in  Moberly,  Mr.  Butler  has  taken  an  active  and 
interested  part  in  civic  affairs.  He  was  elected  a  member  of  the  city 
council  by  a  big  majority  in  1916  and  was  reelected  in  1918  and  now  is 
serving  his  sixth  year  as  a  member  of  that  body.  At  the  present  time 
he  is  chairman  of  the  committee  on  parks,  public  buildings  and  also 
serves  as  a  member  of  the  cemetery  board.  Mr.  Butler  is  a  member  of 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Rebeccas  and  maintains 
a  residence  at  410  Johnson  street  and  owns  property  at  401  Johnson 
street,  Moberly,  Mo. 


328  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

William  Henry  Emerson  was  a  well  known  and  prosperous  business 
man  of  Moberly  for  many  years.  He  was  born  on  a  farm  a  half  mile 
east  of  Huntsville,  on  the  Moberly  road,  passed  his  life  in  this  county, 
and  died  April  13,  1915,  aged  70  years. 

William  H.  Emerson's  parents  were  Simpson  and  Catharine  (Owens) 
Emerson,  the  former  born  in  Randolph  County,  the  son  of  James  Emer- 
son, who  came  to  Missouri  from  Kentucky  in  1827,  was  a  pioneer  set- 
tler; the  mother  was  also  from  Kentucky.  She  was  the  daughter  of 
Edward  Owens,  who  located  here  in  1831.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Emerson  were 
but  children  when  their  families  came  to  Randolph  County.  There  were 
four  children  in  the  Emerson  family:  William  H.,  deceased;  Sarah  Mar- 
tha, also  deceased;  Mary  Elizabeth,  deceased;  James  E. 

William  H.  Emerson  spent  his  boyhood  days  on  his  mother's  farm, 
near  Moberly;  his  father  died  when  he  was  11  years  old.  He  was  given 
the  educational  advantages  obtainable  here  at  that  period  and  remained 
at  home  until  his  19th  year  when  he  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army, 
promptly  showing  his  convictions  by  being  one  of  the  first  youths  of 
the  locality  to  enter  the  service,  and  remained  in  the  army  until  peace 
was  declared.  On  returning  to  Missouri,  Mr.  Emerson  reached  Moberly 
in  time  to  attend  the  first  sale  of  lots  when  the  town-site  of  Mober|y 
was  plotted,  Sept.  27,  1866,  and  he  w^as.  among  the  first  purchasers.  Mr. 
Emerson  had  been  converted  at  Sugar  Creek  Camp  Meeting  and  joined 
the  church,  but  later  transferred  his  membership  to  the  Methodist  church, 
south,  of  which  he  was  a  faithful  member  all  his  life.  He  was  a  Mason, 
having  joined  the  Blue  Lodge  in  Moberly,  in  1868. 

On  April  23,  1874,  Mr.  Emerson  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Jane 
Holbrook,  of  Randolph  County,  the  daughter  of  Colbert  and  Nancy  (Milam) 
Holbrook,  the  former  born  in  North  Carolina  in  1797,  and  the  mother 
was  born  in  Tazewell  County,  Va.,  in  1913.  They  were  married  in  1833 
and  four  years  later  came  to  Randolph  County,  where  they  reared  their 
eight  children.  The  father  died  in  1854  and  the  mother  in  1894.  Their 
daughter,  Nancy  Jane,  was  bom  Aug.  13,  1850,  and  is  still  living.  Mrs. 
EmersOn  has  for  many  years  been  one  of  the  fine  southern  women  who 
•is  highly  esteemed  and  has  many  warm  friends  in  Moberly.  She  is  a 
consistent  member  of  the  Methodist  church,  south,  as  were  her  parents. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Emerson  had  one  daughter,  Nina  Catharine,  born,  reared 
and  educated  in  Moberly,  who  in  1911  married  M.  H.  Sullivan,  one  of  the 
well  known  and  prosperous  business  men  of  Moberly.     He  was  a  native 


WILLIAM   H.   EMERSON 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  329 

of  Illinois,  bom  and  reared  in  Springfield  and  came  to  Moberly  to  engage 
in  business  some  years  ago.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sullivan  take  an  active  part 
in  the  social  and  civic  life  of  Moberly. 

Solomon  Milam  Holbrook,  deceased,  was  born  in  Tazewell  County, 
Va.,  Feb.  26,  1836,  the  son  of  Colbert  and  Nancy  (Milam)  Holbrook, 
the  former  bom  in  North  Carolina  in  1797,  and  the  latter  was  born  in 
Tazewell  County,  Va.,  in  1813.  They  were  married  Dec.  25,  1833.  Four 
years  later  they  came  to  Missouri  and  located  on  a  farm  near  Moberly, 
where  their  eight  children  were  reared.  Mr.  Holbrook  died  in  1854  and 
his  widow  died  in  1894.  Both  were  members  of  the  Methodist  church. 
Mr.  Holbrook  spent  his  youth  on  his  mother's  farm,  and  attended  the 
public  schools.  Oct.  11,  1859,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Lucy  Jane  Walden, 
of  Huntsville.  She  was  the  daughter  of  Zephaniah  Walden,  a  well  known 
early  settler  of  the  county.  Ten  children  were  born  to  this  union,  who 
became  well  known  farmers  and  business  men  of  this  locality.  Mr.  Hol- 
brook joined  the  Masonic  order  at  Huntsville,  when  the  Blue  Lodge  was 
organized  at  Moberly  he  became  a  charter  member  here,  transferring 
from  Huntsville. 

In  1861,  Mr.  Holbrook  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army,  servedl 
under  General  Price,  and  later  was  transferred  to  Colonel  Joe  Shelby's 
cavalry,  with  which  he  remained  until  peace  was  declared.  After  return- 
ing to  Missouri,  Mr.  Holbrook  became  a  prosperous  farmer  on  land  situated 
just  south  of  White  House  curve.  He  joined  the  Methodist  church  when 
a  young  man  at  Sugar  Creek,  until  the  Fourth  Street  Methodist  church, 
south,  was  organized  at  Moberly,  when  he  became  a  charter  member. 
Mr.  Holbrook  stood  high  in  his  community  for  his  kind  heart,  for  he 
was  ever  ready  to  give  a  helping  hand  to  the  needy  and  also  for  his 
high  .integrity. 

In  1881,  Mr.  Holbrook  moved  to  Kansas,  where  he  purchased  a 
ranch  of  three  sections  of  land  and  resided  there  until  his  death,  May 
15,  1911.  Many  people  believed  that  Mr.  Holbrook  was  particularly 
fortunate,  but  his  success  in  life  was  du^  to  his  close  application  to  his 
vocation,  executive  ability  and  hard  work,  for  he  was  a  man  of  indomit- 
able energy  and  steady  industry  at  all  times.  For  many  years  Mr. 
Holbrook  took  an  active  part  in  the  civic  life  of  Moberly  and  its  en- 
virons, ever  supporting  every  movement  for  the  improvement  and  de- 
velopment of  this  section  and  he  followed  the  same  plan  of  life  in  his 
new  home  in  Kansas. 


330  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

William  Hellensmith,  the  well  known  owner  and  manager  of  the 
grocery  store  located  at  900  Franklin  street,  Moberly,  has  during  the  past 
five  years  become  well  and  favorably  known  in  the  city  as  one  of  its 
progressive  men.  Through  his  careful  attention  to  his  business,  courtesy 
to  his  customers  and  from  the  high  class  of  groceries  and  meats  he  carries 
in  stock  he  has  built  up  a  large  business.  Mr.  Hellensmith  is  a  native 
Missourian,  bom  near  Prairie  Hill,  Chariton  County.  He  is  a  son  of 
Martin  and  Bettie  (Wilkey)  Hellensmith,  the  former  a  native  of  Illinois 
and  the  latter  of  Chariton  County,  Mo.  She  was  reared  and  educated 
there  and  later  met  Mr.  Hellensmith  and  they  were  married  at  her  home. 
For  about  10  years  after  his  marriage,  Mr.  Hellensmith  remained  in  busi- 
ness in  Chariton  County  and  came  to  Moberly  in  1887,  to  take  a  position 
with  the  Wabash  Railroad  in  the  car  department  where  he  has  remained 
for  33  years;  he  is  one  of  the  oldest  employes  of  the  shops  in  Moberly. 
There  were  eight  children  in  the  Hellensmith  family:  William,  of  this  re- 
view ;  Louis,  Frank,  Carl,  Edward,  Martin,  all  of  Moberly ;  Mabel,  the  wife 
of  Clayton  Smith,  and  Sophia  who  married  Marvin  Dunnivent,  also  of 
Moberly. 

William  Hellensmith  spent  his  boyhood  days  and  early  youth  in 
Moberly  and  attended  the  public  schools.  When  his  school  days  were  past 
he  learned  the  moulder's  trade,  a  vocation  in  which  he  was  employed  for 
14  years  then  entered  the  car  department  of  the  Wabash  Railroad,  where 
he  remained  four  years.  During  this  time  Mr.  Hellensmith  haa  saved 
money  and  after  spending  so  many  years  working  for  others  decided  to 
engage  in  business  for  himself  and  in  1915  purchased  his  present  store 
from  Nelson  Elkins,  where  he  carries  a  full  line  of  stock  and  fancy 
groceries  and  meats.  From  first  entering  upon  this  new  enterprise,  Mr. 
Hellensmith  met  with  marked  success,  due  to  his  care  of  his  stock,  its 
tasteful  display  and  the  courtesy  with  which  his  customers  are  treated 
and  today  he  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  substantial  business  men  of 
the  city. 

On  June  27,  1906,  Mr.  Hellensmith  was  married  to  Miss  Clara  Voth 
of  Moberly.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Henry  and  Minnie  Voth;  the  former 
is  deceased  and  his  widow  now  resides  in  Moberly.  There  were  four  chil- 
dren in  the  Voth  family,  of  whom  Mrs.  Hellensmith  is  the  youngest.  She 
and  her  husband  maintain  a  charming  home  at  1209  Bond  street.  Mr. 
Hellensmith  is  a  member  of  the  National  Union,  the  Security  Benefit 
Association,  and  the  Missouri  State  Life  Association. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  331 

Aubrey  R.  Hammett,  prosecuting  attorney  of  Randolph  County  and  a 
former  probate  judge  of  the  county,  is  one  of  the  leading  members  of 
Randolph  County  bar.  He  Is  descended  from  pioneer  families  of  the 
county  as  his  ancestors  came  to  this  section  when  Missouri  was  con- 
sidered the  frontier,  and  here  they  have  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the 
civic  life  of  the  country. 

Mr.  Hammett  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County,  bom  near  Hunts- 
ville  ,July  24,  1873,  the  son  of  J.  D.  and  L.  Allie  (Rutherford)  Hammett. 
The  father,  also  a  native  of  this  county  was  bom  on  a  farm  three  miles 
northwest  of  Huntsville  in  1847.  He  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and 
after  completing  his  elementary  education  studied  medicine,  graduating 
from  a  medical  college  at  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  and  soon  began  his  professional 
career  near  Huntsville,  where  he  practiced  for  many  years.  Doctor  Ham- 
mett became  one  of  the  well  known  and  skillful  physicians  of  the  county 
and  stood  high  in  the  medical  fraternity  of  central  Missouri.  He  also 
became  extensively  interested  in  business  and  commercial  affairs.  He 
was  in  partnership  with  Joseph  Samuel  in  the  lumber  business.  Later 
he  purchased  a  large  block  of  stock  in  the  Hammett  Bank  at  Huntsville 
which  his  father,  Joseph  M.  Hammett  had  established  and  became  assist- 
ant cashier  of  the  institution  and  later  he  became  president  of  the  bank. 
He  still  retains  his  stock  in  the  bank  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  its 
affairs,  although  he  has  now  given  up  active  business  life  and  lives  in 
Moberly,  Mo. 

Aubrey  R.  Hammett's  paternal  grandfather,  Joseph  M.  Hammett,  was 
a  Kentuckian  who  became  one  of  the  early  settlers  who  took  up  govern- 
ment land  near  Huntsville,  where  he  cleared  320  acres  from  the  virgin 
forest  and  resided  there  until  his  death  in  1883.  L.  Allie  (Rutherford) 
Hammett  was  bom  near  Huntsville,  a  daughter  of  W.  T.  Rutherford,  a 
pioneer  from  Kentucky  who  located  near  Huntsville  at  an  early  day  and 
became  a  tobacco  dealer,  owning  and  managing  two  tobacco  factories 
employing  many  negroes  in  the  care  of  the  product  and  for  many  years 
was  prominent  in  this  line  of  business.  Subsequently  he  became  inter- 
ested in  coal  mining  and  became  a  large  operator  in  this  district.  He 
was  a  prominent  man  of  central  Missouri  and  Randolph '  County  and  his  * 
life  was  closely  identified  with  the  growth  and  development  of  Huntsville.  . 
He  lived  to  be  a  man  of  advanced  age  and  died  in  1905  in  his  91st  year. 
Mrs.  Hammett  was  a  graduate  of  Christian  College,  Columbia,  Mo. 


332  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Dr.  J.  D.  Hammett  and  his  wife  became  the  parents  of  two  children: 
Mary  Belle,  who  married  Rev.  L.  J.  Marshall,  a  Christian  minister,  is 
deceased.  Her  husband  had  chkrge  of  the  Christian  Church  of  Inde- 
pendence, Mo.,  for  seven  years  and  also  of  Wabash  Avenue  Christian 
Church  in  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  erecting  fine  edifices  in  both  places  during  his 
incumbency  as  pastor. 

Aubrey  R.  Hammett  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  Huntsville 
and  attended  the  local  schools.  He  graduated  from  Missouri  Military 
Academy  at  Mexico,  Mo.,  as  senior  captain.  Then  entered  the  State 
University  at  Columbia,  Mo.,  graduating  with  the  class  of  1897  with  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Law.  The  same  year  he  opened  an  office  at  Hunts- 
ville and  became  city  attorney  in  1897.  Mr.  Hammett  became  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  leading  men  of  his  profession  and  "in  1904  was  elected 
probate  judge  of  Randolph  County,  serving  in  that  oftice  until  1904.  In 
1914  Judge  Hammett  moved  to  Moberly  and  four  years  later,  in  1918  was 
elected  prosecuting  attorney  of  the  county,  an  office  which  he  has  since 
filled  in  a  most  able  manner. 

June  11,  1897,  Judge  Hammett  was  married  to  Miss  Oleta  Wise  of 
Callaway  County,  the  daughter  of  James  Wise,  an  early  settler  of  that 
county ;  both  he  and  his  wife  are  now  deceased.  Four  children  have  been 
born  to  Judge  and  Mrs.  Hammett:  J.  W.,  Aubrey,  Oleta  and  J.  D.  While 
in  college.  Judge  Hammett  was  a  member  of  the  Beta  Theta  Pi  fraternity 
and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

James  A.  Fowler,  a  well  known  real  estate  dealer  of  Moberly  with 
offices  in  the  Jennings  Building  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County.  He  was 
born  six  miles  south  of  Moberly,  Sept.  11,  1857  and  is  a  son  of  Jesse  and 
Sarah  M.  (Hamilton)  Fowler.  Jesse  Fowler  was  a  native  of  Howard 
County,  born  in  1828,  the  son  of  Elijah  Fowler,  a  native  of  Boston,  Mass., 
who  came  west  in  the  early  thirties  and  located  near  Burton,  but  shortly 
afterwards,  moved  to  Randolph  County  to  a  homestead,  a  claim  of  gov- 
ernment land  on  which  Oscar  Fowler  now  lives.  Jesse  Fowler  spent 
nearly  all  his  life  on  this  farm  in  Randolph  County.  He  died  at  the  ad- 
vanced age  of  84  years  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  the  old  Hamilton 
<i  cemetery  which  was  entered  by  John  Hamilton,  the  grandfather  of  James 
A.  Fowler.  Jesse  Fowler  used  to  carrj'^  the  corn  on  horseback  to  the 
grist  mill  which  was  located  a  mile  east  of  the  present  site  of  Higbee. 
After  reaching  the  mill  the  horse  was  used  as  motive  power  to  grind  the 
grain. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  333 

John  Hamilton,  the  grandfather  of  James  A.  Fowler,  came  to  Ran- 
dolph County  in  1842.  There  were  so  few  settlers  at  that  period  that 
he  knew  every  man  in  the  county.  He  was  a  prosperous  farmer  and  the 
owner  of  500  acres  of  land  at  the  time  of  his  death.  Sarah  (Hamilton) 
Fowler  was  a .  native  of  Randolph  County  and  was  reared  and  educated 
here.  She  died  in  1882  and  her  remains  are  buried  in  the  Hamilton  ceme- 
tery. There  were  six  children  in  the  Fowler  family :  Susan,  the  widow  of 
W.  M.  Garvin;  James  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Henry  T.,  a  farmer 
near  Evansville;  Anna,  now  Mrs.  Mesimer,  of  Moberly;  J.  H.,  also  of 
Moberly;  Alice,  now  Mrs.  Hamilton,  of  Moberly. 

James  A.  Fowler  was  reared  on  the  farm  and  attended  the  public 
schools  and  after  his  school  days  were  over,  was  engaged  in  farming  until 
1885  and  in  1887  he  engaged  in  the  grocery  busi'iiess  in  Moberly.  He 
subsequently  disposed  of  his  store  and  entered  the  real  estate  and  loan 
business. 

Mr.  Fowler  was  first  married  to  Miss  Mahlia  J.  Reed,  who  died  in 
1885.  Three  children  were  born  to  this  union  and  the  only  one  of  whom 
survives  is  Mrs.  Lena  Reynolds,  of  Moberly.  In  1891,  Mr.  Fowler  mar- 
ried Miss  Georgia  A.  Hill,  of  Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  F.  M.  and 
Elizabeth  Hill,  both  deceased.  F.  M.  Hill  was  a  native  of  Lincoln,  Mo. 
He  died  at  the  age  of  83  while  his  wife  lived  to  be  85  years  old.  Mr. 
Fowler  takes  an  active  part  in  local  affairs  and  has  served  on  the  city 
council  of  Moberly  the  past  12  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  is  one  of  the  progressive  citizens  of 
Moberly  and  Randolph  County. 

Frank  B.  Harvey,  cashier  of  the  Bank  of  Moberly,  is  one  of  Randolph 
County's  progressive  citizens.  He  is  a  native  of  Randolph  County,  born 
about  four  miles  south  of  Moberly  on  March  27,  1881,  the  son  of  B.  F. 
and  Ellen  B.  (Blakey)  Harvey.  B.  F.  Harvey  was  born  in  Howard 
County,  near  Armstrong  and  reared  there.  He  came  to  Randolph  County 
in  the  early  80s  and  organized  the  Randolph  Bank  of  which  he  became 
president.  Later  the  bank  was  reorganized  as  the  First  National  Bank 
of  which  he  was  president.  The  F^rst  National  was  later  reorganized  as 
a  state  bank  and  Mr.  Harvey  served  as  vice-president  until  the  time  of 
his  death  in  1900.  His  remains  are  buried  in  Oakland  cemetery.  Mr. 
Harvey  did  not  confine  all  his  energies  to  banking  alone  but  owned  and 
operated  a  farm,  four  miles  southwest  of  Moberly  and  made  his  home 
there  during  all  the  years  he  was  associated  with  banking  interests  in  the 


334  History  of  Randolph  county 

city.  For  many  years  he  took  an  active  part  in  the  civic  life  of  the  com- 
munity and  for  one  term  sei'ved  as  presiding  judge  of  the  county  court. 
Mrs.  Harvey  now  lives  in  Moberly.  There  were  two  children  in  the 
Harvey  family  besides  Frank:  Mary  E.,  deceased,  and  Julia,  also  de- 
ceased. , 

Frank  Harvey  was  reared  on  the  family  place  near  this  city  of  Mob- 
erly and  was  given  the  educational  advantages  of  the  public  schools  here, 
graduating  from  the  high  school  in  1899.  The  following  year  he  spent  at 
the  State  University  at  Columbia,  but  his  college  career  was  cut  short  by 
his  father's  death  in  1900,  when  he  returned  home  to  assume  charge  of 
the  farm  and  agricultural  interests  of  the  family.  He  continued  as  man- 
ager of  the  farm  until  1910,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  entered  the 
Bank  of  Moberly  as  bookkeeper.  Six  years  later  he  became  cashier  of 
the  institution  and  has  since  capably  held  that  position. 

In  1913  Mr.  Harvey  married  Miss  Anna^  Andre  of  Moberly,  the 
daughter  of  Daniel  and  Belle  Andre,  the  former  residing  now  in  McAlester, 
Mont.,  and  his  wife  is  deceased.  Two  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harvey:  Frank  B.,  Jr.,  and  Ellen  Belle,  both  at  home  with  their 
parents. 

Mr..  Harvey  is  considered  one  of  the  capable  bankers  of  this  section 
and  is  a  man  of  many  warm  friends  and  business  associates.  He  is  a 
Knight  Templar  Mason. 

William  J.  Meals,  a  well  known  farmer  and  stockman  of  Sugar  Creek 
township,  was  bom  near  Boonsboro,  Howard  County,  Mo.,  March  3,  1838 
and  is  a  son  of  James  Preston  and  Rebecca  (Woodard)  Meals.  The 
father  was  one  of  the  very  earliest  settlers  of  Howard  County  and  in 
1840  he  located  in  Randolph  County  where  he  entered  land  three  miles 
east  of  the  present  site  of  Moberly.  He  paid  $1.25  per  acre  and  this  land 
is  still  owned  by  members  of  the  Meals  family.  The  first  house  which 
was  built  on  the  place  long  before  the  Civil  War,  is  still  standing.  The 
Meals  family  cemetery  is  located  on  this  place  and  Leonidas  Meals,  brother 
of  Wilham  J.  Meals,  was  the  first  person 'to  be  buried  in  that  cemetery. 
This  was  in  1840.  James  and  Rebecca  Meals  are  also  both  buried  in 
this  cemetery.  The  former  died  in  1880  and  his  wife  departed  this  life 
ten  years  later.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  James, 
deceased;  John,  resides  in  Moberly;  Albert,  Moberly;  William  J.,  the  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch;  Mary,  Cynthia,  Robert  and  Thomas,  the  latter  four 
of  whom  are  deceased. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  335 

William  J.  Meals  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  and  attended  the 
schools  of  that  time  which  were  principally  subscription  schools.  He 
engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising  on  his  own  account  in  early  life 
and  has  met  with  well  merited  success.  He  is  now  the  owner  of  360 
acres  of  well  improved  and  valuable  land  in  Sugar  Creek  township.  His 
son,  Marvin,  is  the  owner  of  60  acres  which  lies  just  across  the  road  from 
his  father's  place.  Marvin  Meals  is  well  known  and*a  successful  general 
fanner  and  stock  raiser  and  he  has  given  considerable  more  attention  to 
breeding  than  the  average  farmer,  and  is  the  owner  of  one  of  the  best 
herds  of  registered  Aberdeen  Angus  cattle  in  this  section  of  the  state. 
His  herd  is  headed  by  a  valuable  registered  male  animal  from  the  herd 
of  James  Cottingham,  the  sire  of  which  came  from  the  herd  of  Erscher 
and  Ryan  of  Iowa. 

Dec.  16,  1858,  William  J.  Meals  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Grimes, 
a  native  of  Randolph  County.  She  was  born  on  the  site  of  the  present 
city  of  Moberly,  March  13,  1839  and  is  a  daughter  of  Henry  Grimes,  a 
pioneer  settler  in  this  locality.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Meals  have  been  bom 
the  following  children:  Logan,  a  farmer  and  stockman  of  Prairie  town- 
ship; Belle,  widow  of  W.  J.  Engle,  resides  in  Monroe  County;  Newton, 
Monroe  County,  Mo.;  Lucy  married  J.  P.  Bennett  and  resides  at  Coweta, 
Okla.,  and  Marvin,  who  resides  near  his  father  in  Sugar  Creek  township 
and  who  is  interested  in  the  breeding  of  Aberdeen  Angus  cattle. 

Marvin  Meals  was  bom  on  the  Meals  homestead  in  Sugar  Creek  town- 
ship, Jan.  6,  1873.  Here  he  spent  his  boyhood  days  and  attended  the 
schools  in  District  No.  53.  Since  early  life,  he  has  followed  farming  and 
while  he  is  the  owner  of  a  farm  of  60  acres  of  his  own  in  the  vicinity  of 
the  old  home  place,  he  is  also  associated  with  his  father  in  general  farm- 
ing and  stock  raising  and  specializing  in  the  breeding  of  Aberdeen  Angus 
cattle.  Mr.  Meals  is  one  of  the  best  known  successful  breeders  of  this 
favorite  strain  of  cattle  in  Randolph  County. 

Marvin  Meals  was  united  in  marriage  Sept.  26,  1895  with  Miss  Mary 
T.  Howell  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Ursley,  who  married  William 
Everette,  principal  of  the  Unionville  High  School,  Unionville,  Mo.  Mrs. 
Everette  is  a  graduate  of  the  Goeteze  School  of  Music  of  Moberly  and  is 
now  engaged  in  teaching  in  the  Unionville  High  School  where  her  hus- 
band is  principal.  She  is  instructor  in  English  and  is  also  head  of  the 
music  department  of  that  institution. 


336  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Marvin  Meals  is  a  member  of  the  Randolph  County  Aberdeen  Asso- 
ciation and  through  his  efforts  as  a  breeder,  has  largely  contributed  to 
raising  the  standard  of  live  stock  in  Randolph  County. 

Benjamin  Reeves  White,  a  pioneer  business  man  of  Moberly,  now 
retired,  has  been  a  resident  of  this  city  for  half  a  century.  He  is  a 
native  of  Missouri  and  a  member  of  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  families 
of  this  state.  Mr.  White  was  bom  in  Howard  County,  March  1,  1839, 
and  is  a  son  of  David  and 'Nancy  E.  (Maupin)  White.  David  White  was 
bom  in  Virginia  and  came  to  Missouri  with  his  parents  who  settled  in 
Howard  County  before  Missouri  was  admitted  to  statehood.  He  mar- 
ried Nancy  E.  Maupim,  a  native  of  Kentucky.  He  entered  government 
land  about  five  miles  northwest  of  Fayette,  Mo.,  and  there  he  and  his 
wife  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives.  He  became  well-to-do  and  at 
the  time  of  his  death  in  1866  he  was  the  owner  of  500  acres  of  land. 
His  wife  died  in  1868  and  their  remains  are  buried  in  the  Hackley  Ceme- 
tery in  Howard  County.  This  is  one  of  the  old  cemeteries  of  that  sec- 
tion and  is  neatly  kept.  It  is  surrounded  by  a  solid  row  of  cedar  trees 
about  20  feet  in  height  which  are  kept  neatly  trimmed  and  present  an 
attractive  appearance. 

To  David  and  Nancy  E.  (Maupin)  White  were  bom  the  following 
children:  William,  deceased;  James,  deceased;  David,  resides  in  Mo- 
berly; Mrs.  Anna  Hockley,  who  resides  at  Armstrong,  Mo.,  and  is  93 
years  of  age;  Mrs.  Melissa  Green;  Mrs.  Nancy  E.  Bradtcer,  Armstrong, 
Mo.;  Benjamin  R.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  Mrs.  Adelle  Hannah, 
deceased. 

Benjamin  Reeves  White  had  good  educational  advantages  when  he 
was  a  boy  and  obtained  a  good  education  and  in  early  life  taught  school 
for  a  number  of  years.  In  1870,  he  came  to  Moberly  and  bought  prop- 
erty here,  where  he  engaged  in  the  livery  business  and  also  conducted 
a  retail  coal  and  wood  business.  Before  the  advent  of  the  automobile 
when  the  livery  business  was  a  flourishing  institution,  Mr.  White  car- 
ried on  an  extensive  livery  business  and  had  as  many  as  40  horses  at 
one  time.  He  conducted  one  of  the  large  livery  stables  of  this  section 
of  the  state  and  prospered. 

Mr.  White  was  married  Dec.  7,  1875,  to  Miss  Katie  V.  Corbett,  of 
Jerseyville,  111.  She  died  in  March,  1919,  and  her  remains  are  interred 
in  Oakland  Cemetery.  The  children  bom  to  Benjamin  R.  White  and 
wife  are  as  follows:     George  E.,  married  Miss  Marie  Bassett  and  has 


B.    R.   WHITE 


HISTOKY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  337 

two  children,  Dan  and  Ben  Ray;  Addie  C.  and  Edna  at  home  with  their 
father,  and  Allen  C,  who  is  engaged  in  the  automobile  supply  business, 
a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume. 

Mr.  White  resides  at  626  Fisk  avenue  in  a  large  comfortable  resi- 
dence which  has  been  his  home  for  a  number  of  years.  He  is  one  of 
the  honored  pioneer  residents  of  Randolph  County  and  has  a  long  record 
to  his  credit  for  reliability  and  fair  dealing  of  which  any  man  may  be 
proud. 

Walter  C.  Buchanan,  a  progressive  farmer  and  stock  raiser  of  Sugar 
Creek  township,  Randolphh  County,  belongs  to  a  pioneer  family  of  the 
state.  His  grandfather,  Colman  C.  Buchanan,  came  here  from  Tennessee 
in  1836  and  entered  the  land  which  Walter  C.  Buchanan  now  owns,  ad- 
jacent to  the  city  of  Moberly,  being  one  of  the  first  men  to  take  up  gov- 
ernment land' on  thees  prairies. 

Walter  C.  Buchanan  was  born  on  the  old  homestead  in  Randolph 
County,  Nov.  29,  1877  and  is  a  son  of  Matthew  and  Sarah  M.  (Wisdom) 
Buchanan.  The  father  was  bom  on  the  same  place  in  1838  and  died  in 
April,  1903,  and  is  buried  in  the  Sugar  Creek  cemetery.  He  was  a  farmer 
all  his  life.  Sarah  (Wisdom)  Buchanan  was  bom  in  Macon  County,  Mo., 
in  1851  and  died  in  December,  1919  and  her  remains  are  buried  in  Sugar 
Creek  cemetery.  Sugar  Creek  cemetery  was  established  about  1835  and 
one  of  the  Rubey  family  was  the  first  to  be  buried  there. 

Matthew  Buchanan  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army  during  the  Civil 
War  and  served  under  General  Price.  He  was  captured  at  Little  Rock, 
Ark.  and  was  confined  in  the  Federal  prison  at  Alton,  111.  He  was  re- 
leased but  before  he  could  rejoin  his  regiment  was  again  captured  and 
sent  to  Fort  Delaware.  The  two  imprisonments  totaled  22  months  when 
he  was  exchanged.  On  his  return  to  Randolph  County,  peace  was  de- 
clared. He  became  one  of  the  prominent  farmers  and  stock  raisers  of 
the  section  of  the  state.  He  was  elected  presiding  judge  of  the  county 
court,  an  office  he  filled  efficiently  for  eight  years.  His  children  were 
Cyrus  Earl,  an  inspector  at  the  Kansas  State  Agricultural  College,  Man- 
hattan, Kansas,  where  he  has  charge  of  the  registry  division  under 
Professor  Fitch ;  Ratie,  now  Mrs.  M.  Reagan  of  Tulsa,  Okla. ;  Onie  A.,  of 
Moberly,  who  has  a  position  in  the  Wabash  shops;  Walter  C,  the  subject 
of  this  sketch;  Claude  C,  of  La  Junta,  Colo.,  now  serving  his  third  term 
as  county  assessor. 


338  HISTOKY  OP  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Walter  C.  Buchanan  was  reared  on  the  farm  near  Moberly  and  at- 
tended the  district  school  of  Sugar  Creek  township  and  then  entered  the 
Moberly  High  School,  graduating  in  1898.  He  has  followed  farming  since 
reaching  manhood.  In  addition  to  his  work  on  the  farm,  Mr.  Buchanan 
has  for  more  than  a  year  and  a  half  had  charge  of  one  of  the  rural  mail 
delivery  routes  out  of  Moberly.  The  farm  is  one  of  the  well  kept  places 
of  the  county  and  has  a  fine  seven  room  house,  good  barns  and  machinery 
sheds  and  120  acres  of  fine  arable  land  with  the  timber  tract  of  some 
20  acres  adjoining,  which  is  all  now  in  estate  and  is  being  sold  in  1920. 

In  1906,  Walter  C.  Buchanan  was  married  to  Miss  Minnie  B.  Mor- 
rison, of  Cairo,  Mo.,  the  daughter  of  E.  S.  and  Susan  Morrison,  of  Cairo. 
Two  children  have  been  born  to  this  union :  Morrison  Young  and  Dorothy, 
both  residing  at  home. 

The  old  Buchanan  family  residence  which  was  used  a's  a  tavern  in 
stage  coach  days,  this  being  a  station  on  the  stage  route,  is  owned  today 
by  A.  M.  Buchanan.  It  was  built  long  before  the  Civil  War  and  is  an 
eight  room  structure.  It  is  in  a  fair  condition  today  and  is  one  of  the 
old  landmarks  of  the  country.  This  house  stands  across  the  road  from 
the  Mathews  Buchanan  farm  residence,  one  mile  north  of  Moberly. 

Thomas  A.  Caplinger,  agent  for  the  American  Express  Company,  of 
Moberly,  Mo.,  is  a  native  of  this  state,  bom  at  P'aris,  Dec.  16,  1856.  He 
is  the  son  of  Andrew  and  Susan  Gentry  (Maupin)  Caplinger  the  former 
a  native  of  Kentucky,  born  in  Scott  County,  in  1824  and  died  in  Moberly 
in  1893. 

Andrew  Caplinger  enlisted  in  the  Union  Army  at  the  outbreak  of  the 
Civil  War,  served  throughout  that  conflict  and  was  mustered  out  of  the 
service  at  Paris,  Mo.,  where  he  had  enlisted.  He  was  a  pioneer  settler 
of  Missouri,  locating  at  Paris  in  1842  and  met  and  married  his  wife 
there.  She  was  born  in  Albemarle  County,  Va.,  in  1826  and  now  resides 
in  Moberly,  a  most  remarkable  woman,  94  years  of  age,  and  still  retains 
her  mental  faculties  and  much  of  her  physical  vigor.  Her  son  has  in  his 
possession  a  sweater  knitted  by  her  in  1918.  There  were  12  children  in 
the  family:  Mrs.  T.  H.  Hardcastle,  Thomas  A.,  Mrs.  W.  L.  Skinner,  and 
A.  B.,  all  of  Moberly;  Mrs.  G.  W.  Tucker,  deceased;  Joseph,  accidentally 
killed  in  1910;  Mrs.  C.  M.  Smith,  deceased;  Mrs.  E.  W.  Berry,  deceased; 
George,  deceased,  a  child  that  died  in  infancy;  Adrena,  deceased  and  Ice- 
phena,  also  deceased. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  339 

Thomas  A.  Caplinger  was  reared  in  Paris,  Mo.,  attended  the  public 
school  and  after  his  education  was  finished  engaged  in  the  drug  business 
there,  becoming  prominent  in  that  profession  and  continued  to  run  his 
store  for  20  years.  Disposing  of  it,  he  purchased  a  grocery  business 
which  he  owned  and  ran  two  years  before,  coming  to  Moberly  in  1891. 
Mr,  Caplinger  become  associated  with  C.  W.  Tucker,  the  express  agent 
here  and  continued  to  work  with  him  12  years  and  in  1906  was  appointed 
express  agent,  an  office  he  has  efficiently  filled  to  the  present  time. 

Mr.  Caplinger  has  a  modern  residence  at  731  S.  Clark  street,  which 
he  has  remodeled  into  an  attractive  home.  He  is  one  of  the  substantial 
citizens  of  Moberly,  and  for  more  than  45  years  has  been  a  member  of  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 

Daniel  T.  Kelliher,  senior  member  of  the  firm  of  Kelliher  &  Ryan, 
leading  printers  of  Moberly,  is  a  capable  newspaper  man  of  wide  experi- 
ence as  well  as  a  practical  printer.  He  has  virtually  made  his  way  up 
from  the  bottom  of  the  ladder  by  himself  and  in  all  the  lines  of  endeavor 
has  shown  the  same  initiative  and  ability  that  are  the  marked  character- 
istics of  his  business  successes  in  Missouri.  He  is  a  native  of  Missouri, 
born  in  Richmond  Sept.  18,  1889.  His  parents  were  Cornelius  and  Mary 
(Tuohy)  Kelliher,  both  of  whom  now  reside  in  Moberly.  The  father  is  a 
native  of  Colchester,  111.,  born  in  1857  and  Mrs.  Kelliher  was  born  in  1857. 

Cornelius  Kelliher  came  to  Moberly  when  only  16  years  of  age  and  a 
few  years  later  located  at  Richmond,  where  he  resided  some  time  before 
going  to  Renick  and  then  came  to  Moberly  in  1900,  since  which  time  he 
and  his  wife  have  been  well  known  and  popular  residents  of  this  city. 
At  the  present  time  he  holds  a  position  with  the  Wabash  Railroad.  There 
were  two  children  in  the  Kelliher  family;  William  of  Adair  County  and 
Daniel  T.  of  this  review.  He  was  a  good  sized  boy  when  the  family  moved 
to  Renick  and  attended  school  there.  He  then  attended  the  normal  school 
at  Macomb,  111.,  but  left  that  institution  in  his  freshman  year  to  enter  the 
field  of  journalism.  For  ten  years  he  was  on  the  staff  of  the  Moberly 
Daily  Monitor.  He  resigned  his  position  to  become  as  he  says  "a  cub 
reporter"  on  the  Kansas  City  Post  and  while  associated  with  that  paper 
had  many  interesting  experiences,  one  of  the  most  interesting  being  the 
time  when  he  was  assigned  to  secure  an  interview  with  Lord  NorthcliflPe, 
when  he  was  touring  the  country,  in  1917,  traveling  on  a  special  train. 
Mr.  Kelliher  met  the  train  at  Sheffield,  a  Kansas  City  suburb,  boarded  it 
while  running  swiftly  and  was  introduced  to  Lord  Northcliffe,  who  gave 


340  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

him  the  desired  story  and  scored  a  beat  on  all  other  Kansas  City  papers. 
Mr.  Kelliher  was  advanced  from  "cub  reporter"  to  highest  salaried  man 
on  the  staff.  After  remaining  with  the  Kansas  City  Post  for  a  year, 
Mr.  Kelliher  was  offered  a  position  at  Parsons,  Kans.,  as  managing  editor 
of  the  Parsons  Daily  Sun.  He  returned  to  Kansas  City  to  The  Post,  but 
a  month  later  went  to  St.  Louis  to  take  a  better  position  with  the  St.  Louis 
Post  Dispatch  where  he  remained  until  May  15,  1919,  when  he  resigned 
and  came  to  Moberly  where  he  formed  the  partnership  with  Mr.  Ryan  and 
opened  their  present  business,  where  they  are  equipped  to  do  all  kinds 
of  job  printing  of  a  high  class. 

Mr.  Kelliher  married  Miss  Beulah  Cleeton  of  Lancaster,  Mo.  and  they 
have  two  children:  Cornelius  Lee  and  Daniel  C. 

H.  Edwin  Ryan,  of  the  well  known  printing  firm  of  Kelliher  &  Ryan, 
located  at  211  North  Williams  street,  Moberly,  which  opened  up  for  busi- 
ness May  15,  1919,  succeeding  J.  E.  McQuitty,  who  had  conducted  a  print- 
ing and  stationery  business  here,  is  a  native  son  of  Missouri,  born  at 
Moberly,  Nov.  8,  1893.  He  is  a  son  of  Thomas  F.  and  Lavonia  (Robert- 
son) Ryan,  the  former  a  native  of  Leavenworth,  Kan.  and  the  latter  of 
Sugar  Creek  township,  Randolph  County,  Mo.  Thomas  F.  Ryan  was  a 
painter  and  grainer  by  trade,  specializing  in  the  latter  art  and  came  to 
Moberly  in  the  early  80's  and  was  engaged  in  business  here  the  remainder 
of  his  life.  He  died  in  1912.  He  was  laid  to  rest  in  Oakland  cemetery. 
His  widow  now  lives  on  West  Fisk  avenue,  Moberly.  There  were  four 
children  in  the  Ryan  family:  L.  T.,  Council  Bluffs,  la.;  Helen,  deceased; 
H.  Edwin,  of  this  review;  Gus  R.,  who  has  charge  of  the  credit  depart- 
ment of  D.  M.  Ferry  &  Co.,  of  Detroit,  Mich.  He  enlisted  for  service  in 
the  World  War  in  April  1918,  was  assigned  to  the  electrical  department 
and  sent  to  St.  Louis,  and  later  he  was  transferred  to  Camp  Jessup,  Ga., 
with  the  motor  transport  corps.  He  was  rapidly  promoted  to  top  sergeant 
of  his  company  and  was  boarding  the  train  for  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  to  embark 
for  overseas  service  the  day  the  armistice  was  signed. 

H.  Edwin  Ryan  was  reared  here  in  Moberly  and  attended  the  public 
schools  and  when  12  years  old  began  work  in  a  printing  office  so  by  the 
time  he  had  completed  his  studies  he  was  a  practical  printer.  When  he 
left  school  Mr.  Ryan  entered  the  employ  of  the  Democrat  Publishing 
Company  where  he  remained  12  years.  From  being  a  printer's  apprentice 
he  was  advanced  from  one  position  to  another  until  he  was  master  printer 
in  charge  of  all  the  finest  and  most  difficult  work  in  the  establishment. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  341 

Then  he  was  made  foreman  of  the  plant,  a  position  he  filled  for  18  months, 
when  he  and  Mr.  Kelliher  formed  a  partnership.  In  the  spring  of  1919, 
Mr.  Ryan  and  Mr.  Kelliher  purchased  their  present  plant.  They  have 
greatly  increased  the  output  and  established  a  reputation  for  the  excel- 
lence of  their  workmanship. 

Oct.  6,  1915,  Mr.  Ryan  was  married  to  Miss  Eugenia  R.  Brock  of 
Moberly,  a  native  of  Excello,  Mo.  She  was  a  teacher  for  four  years  prior 
to  her  marriage.  Mrs.  Ryan  is  the  daughter  of  William  T.  and  Henrietta 
(Weymouth)  Brock.  The  father  was  bom  at  Excello,  Mo.,  and  the  mother 
was  born  in  Scotland,  coming  to  the  United  States  when  she  was  18  years 
old.  Two  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ryan :  Elizabeth  Park 
and  Margaret  Cathrine. 

Mr.  Ryan  has  been  secretary  of  the  Typographical  Union  No.  473, 
of  Moberly,  since  1911.  The  Kelliher-Ryan  Company  prints  everything 
in  the  job  work  line  and  are  well  known  for  the  fine  catalogue  work.  They 
also  are  locally  known  as  the  publishers  of  the  Nation  Swine  Advertiser, 
a  monthly  publication  with  a  circulation  of  5,000  copies. 

AV.  B.  Jones,  the  leading  horticulturist  of  Randolph  County  and  a 
prominent  farmer  and  dairyman  of  this  section  is  one  of  the  old  residents 
who  has  gained  a  high  reputation  for  his  business  integrity,  bom  in  Wales 
May  27,  1843.  He  is  the  son  of  Benjamin  and  Esther  Jones,  both  natives 
of  the  same  country,  where  they  spent  their  lives.  Mr.  Jones  spent  his 
youth  in  his  native  land  and  was  educated  in  the  public  schools.  He 
emigrated  from  Wales  in  1868  and  after  reaching  the  United  States, 
located  in  St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  but  a  year  later  went  to  Macon  County,  where 
he  engaged  in  the  butcher  business  until  1870,  when  he  came  to  Moberly 
and  opened  a  shop  where  he  built  up  a  fine  business  which  he  conducted 
for  many  years. 

In  1895,  Mr.  Jones  decided  to  become  a  farmer  and  horticulturist, 
as  he  had  always  loved  the  country  and  believed  there  was  money  to  be 
made  in  raising  fruit.  He  purchased  his  present  place  of  80  acres,  putting 
25  acres  into  orchard  and  today  the  apple  trees  he  then  planted  are  all 
bearing  and  have  been  doing  so  for  years.  In  1919,  Mr.  Jones  had  2,000 
bushels  of  fine  apples,  his  varieties  being  Jonathan,  Blacktwig,  York 
Imperial,  Winesaps,  Grimes  Golden  and  a  few  Ben  Davis,  but  Mammoth 
Blacktwig  and  Jonathan  trees  predominate.  So  that  Mr.  Jones'  vision 
was  a  most  substantial  one  and  today  he  is  the  owner  of  the  largest  and 
most  productive  orchard  in  the  county.     In  1919  he  set  out  1,500  more 


342  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

trees  which  will  bear  within  a  short  time.  Mr.  Jones  has  not  confined 
his  energies  to  his  orchard  alone  but  is  considerable  of  a  farmer  and  dairy- 
inan.  He  annually  raises  around  200  bushels  of  corn  which  he  feeds  to 
his  100  head  of  hogs,  as  he  specializes  in  Chester  White  hogs;  he  also 
milks  18  head  of  cows,  selling  the  milk.  All  this  work  he  does  himself 
which  is  rather  remarkable  for  a  man  of  his  years.  In  addition  to  the 
home  farm  of  80  acres,  Mr.  Jones  owns  157  acres  a  mile  west  of  his  place 
and  a  160  acre  tract  in  Wichita  County,  Kan. 

Mr.  Jones  was  first  married  to  Mary  Johns  in  Wales,  who  died  in 
1869,  leaving  a  son,  John,  who  lives  in  Oklahoma,  and  Mr.  Jones  wafe 
again  married  on  Jan.  7,  1873,  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Humes,  of  Randolph 
County  the  daughter  of  Philip  and  Amanda  (McKinzey)  Humes,  who 
came  here  fromb  Kentucky  and  settled  on  land  just  south  of  the  present 
town  site  of  Moberly ;  both  are  now  deceased.  McKinzey  street,  Moberly, 
is  named  after  James  McKinzey,  Mrs.  Jones'  grandfather,  who  was  a 
pioneer  settler  here.  The  following  children  have  been  born  to  the  Jones 
family:  Isaac,  lives  in  Texas;  Nannie  married  D.  J.  Mandry,  of  Bartles- 
ville,  Okla. ;  Esther,  deceased;  Mary  and  Martha,  twins,  died  in  infancy; 
Nellie,  married  J.  W.  Burton,  of  Bartlesville,  Okla. ;  Willia  C,  now  Mrs. 
W.  C.  Fonville,  of  Moberly,  and  Ashley,  also  of  Bartlesville,  Okla. 

Mr.  Jones  is  a  Republican  and  made  the  race  for  county  judge  and 
was  defeated  in  an  avowedly  Democratic  county  by  only  80  votes  which 
shows  his  popularity  in  the  community. 

Bell  Brothers,  one  of  the  leading  contracting  and  building  firms  of 
Moberly,  is  owned  and  managed  by  James  E.  and  Thurman  R.  Bell,  who 
are  among  the  younger  generation  of  business  men  of  this  city. 

Thurman  Bell  was  born  in  Chariton  County,  Mo.,  Feb.  17,  1885,  the 
son  of  E.  N.  and  Columbus  E.  (Lepper)  Bell,  both  of  whom  now  reside  in 
Moberly. 

Columbus  E.  Bell  was  born  in  Monroe  County,  the  son  of  John  and 
Linda  (Welsh)  Bell,  the  former  a  native  of  Virginia  who  came  west  at 
an  early  day  and  located  in  Missouri.  His  wife  was  of  Welsh  descent  and 
lived  to  be  87  years  old.  John  Lepper  and  his  wife  were  bom  in  Ger- 
many and  emigrated  from  their  native  land  and  after  reaching  the  United 
States  settled  in  Monroe  County,  Mo.,  and  were  pioneer  farmers  of  that 
section  of  the  state.  The  children  of  E.  M.  and  Columbus  Bell  were 
James  E.  and  Thurman  R. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  343 

James  E.  Bell  was  bom  in  Monroe  County,  May  18,  1877,  an4  was 
educated  in  the  Centralia  schools  and  after  completing  his  education,  he 
learned  the  carpenter's  trade.Within  a  short  time  he  began  to  do  small 
contracting  jobs  which  led  him  to  become  a  general  building  contractor, 
a  line  of  business  which  he  followed  in  Centralia  for  10  years  before 
coming  to  Moberly. 

On  March  19,  1899,  James  Bell  married  Miss  Vera  Saunders,  the 
daughter  of  Gus  Saunders,  a  butcher  of  Centralia;  both  he  and  his  wife 
were  natives  of  Germany;  they  came  to  the  United  States  when  young 
and  Mr.  Saunders  first  located  in  St.  Louis  where  he  was  married  to  Marie 
Wetterath  in  1874,  and  they  later  came  to  Centralia.  The  father  died 
there  in  his  64th  year.  Mrs.  Bell  was  the  oldest  of  their  four  children. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bell  have  two  children:  Frederick  William  and  Dorothy 
Frances.  A  third  child  died  when  five  years  old.  The  family  reside  at 
316  South  Williams  street. 

James  E.  Bell  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen 
of  Kansas  City,  Kans.  He  is  a  public  spirited  man  ever  ready  to  support 
any  movement  for  the  improvement  of  the  city  which  has  become  his 
home. 

Thurman  Bell,  like  his  brother,  spent  his  boyhood  days  in  Centralia, 
was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  that  town  and  after  his  schooling 
was  over  and  he  was  large  enough  began  to  work  as  a  carpenter.  He 
mastered  that  trade  and  after  a  time  began  to  contract  for  buildings. 
Coming  to  Moberly  in  1905,  his  first  work  in  the  city  was  the  building  of 
a  house  for  J.  W.  Meyer  in  Millers  Park  edition.  He  and  his  brother 
formed  a  partnership  in  the  contracting  business  under  the  firm  name  of 
Bell  Brothers,  with  offices  at  800  South  Williams  street,  since  which  time 
they  have  taken  a  leading  place  in  the  building  and  contracting  business 
of  Moberly.  They  have  erected  many  fine  private  residences  and  the 
Farmers  and  Merchants  Bank  in  Moberly.  At  the  present  time  they 
have  a  number  of  residences  and  buildings  under  contract  or  construc- 
tion. They  are  keen  business  men,  have  won  a  high  reputation  for  in- 
tegrity in  carrying  out  their  business  obligations. 

Thurman  R.  Bell  was  married  in  1906  to  Miss  Alice  E.  Paggett,  of 
Monroe  County,  the  daughter  of  John  J.  and  Frances  Paggett,  the  former 
now  deceased  and  Mrs.  Paggett  lives  in  the  old  home.  Three  children 
were  born  to  this  union:  Goldie  Opal,  Thurman  R.,.  Jr.,  and  Mildred,  all 
at  home  with  their  parents.    The  family  has  a  fine  home  at  800  South 


344  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Williams  street.     Mr.   Bell  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  o:^ 
America  and  the  Carpenters  Union. 

0.  R.  Nise,  of  the  grocery  firm  of  Nise  &  Company,  113  East  Coates 
street,  and  senior  member  of  the  Nise  &  Glover  garage,  located  at  549 
West  Coates  street,  is  one  of  the  well  known  retail  business  men  of  Mo 
berly,  who  has  taken  an  energetic  part  in  the  upbuilding  and  developmen 
of  this  city.  He  was  born  in  Boone  County,  Mo.,  Aug.  24,  1871,  the  son 
of  A.  H.  and  Margaret  (Geurin)  Nise,  the  former  a  native  of  Germany, 
who  located  in  Missouri  prior  to  the  Civil  War  and  was  engaged  in  the 
hardware  business  at  Sturgeon  before  coming  to  Moberly,  where  he  was 
in  business  the  rest  of  his  active  life.  His  widow  now  resides  on  Union 
avenue.  There  were  three  children  in  the  family :  Ernest,  of  Los  Angeles ; 
Fannie,  of  Moberly,  and  0.  R.,  of  this  review,  by  a  former  marriage  of 
Mr.  Nise  had  had  five  children,  all  of  whom  reside  in  Moberly. 

-  0.  R.  Nise  was  reared  and  educated  in  Sturgeon  and  graduated  from 
the  high  school.  He  began  to  work  for  his  father  in  the  hardware  busi- 
ness and  in  1893  opened  a  grocery  and  meat  market  at  his  present  loca- 
tion, being  one  of  the  first  men  to  put  modern  equipment  in  his  establish- 
ment. When  automobiles  began  to  become  popular,  Mr.  Nise  saw  that 
there  was  a  great  future  in  the  garage  business  and  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  F.  T.  Glover,  opening  a  building  for  that  purpose  at  549  West 
Coates  street,  where  they  have  built  up  a  good  business.  They  carry 
all  automobile  accessories,  have  a  good  service  station  and  paint  cars. 
For  many  years,  Mr.  Nise  has  taken  an  active  part  in  the  civic  life  of  the 
community,  and  for  eight  years  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  city 
council.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  of  Moberly,  being 
one  of  the  charter  members. 

John  F.  KjTiaston,  now  living  retired  in  Moberly,  has  been  a  resi- 
dent of  this  city  for  the  past  35  years,  and  for  many  years  was  an 
employee  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  in  this  city.  He  has  been 
a  success  in  a  financial  way  and  has  accumulated  a  competence  and  is 
one  of  the  substantial  and  highly  respected  citizens  of  Randolph  County. 
Mr.  Kynaston  was  bom  in  Earltown,  England,  in  1855,  the  son  of  John 
and  Hannah  (Pursell)  Kynaston,  both  natives  of  England,  and  spent 
their  entire  lives  in  that  country.  They  died  at  Newton  LeWillows, 
Lancashire,  England.  The  mother  died  at  the  age  of  48  and  the  father 
at  68  years  of  age.  .  John  Ksmaston,  the  father,  was  a  prominent  rail- 
road man  in  his  native  land  and  for  many  years  was  superintendent  of 


JOHN    F.    KYNASTON 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  345 

the  London  and  Northwestern  railroad  and  in  later  life  was  engaged 
in  fine  carriage  building.  John  and  Hannah  (Pursell)  Kynaston  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  John  F.,  of  this  review;  William, 
George,  Samuel  and  Mary  Ann  (Brown),  all  of  whom  reside  at  Earls- 
town,  Lancashire,  England,  except  John  F.,  of  this  review.  Sarah  Jane 
the  youngest  of  the  family,  is  deceased. 

John  F.  Kynaston  was  reared  in  his  native  land  and  educated  in 
the  public  schools  and  also  the  School  of  Arts  at  Warrington,  where  he 
became  proficient  in  drawing  and  mechanical  art,  passing  the  examina- 
tion in  that  course.  He  came  to  America  in  1880,  first  locating  at  Jef- 
ferson, Ind.,  where  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Ohio  Falls  Car  Com- 
pany, as  car  builder,  for  over  two  years.  He  then  came  to  St.  Louis 
and  after  remaining  there  18  months  came  to  Moberly  in  1885.  Here 
he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  and  for  28 
years  was  in  the  employ  of  that  company,  continuously,  and  was  one 
of  the  skilled  and  trustworthy  employees,  being  coach  foreman.  At  his 
resignation  in  1913,  he  received  a  letter  from  the  company,  expressing 
its  appreciation  of  his  faithful  and  long  continued  service  and  this  is 
one  of  the  highly  prized  documents  in  Mr.  Kynaston's  possession.  After 
so  many  years  of  service  it  is  a  satisfaction  to  have  tangible  evidence 
that  one's  devotion  to  duty  for  a  long  period  of  years  is  appreciated. 
Since  his  resignation,  seven  years  ago,  Mr.  Kynaston  has  devoted  his 
time  to  looking  after  his  investments  and  various  rental  properties  in 
the  city  of  Moberly.  He  rents  several  residences  in  Moberly  and  also 
owns  16  acres  of  valuable  land  within  the  city  limits. 

John  F.  Kynaston  was  first  married  in  1878  to  Miss  Martha  Julia 
Howcraft,  who  died  in  1914.  To  that  marriage  was  bom  one  daughter, 
Ethel  Violet,  an  attorney  now  in  the  employ  of  the  Guarantee  Title  and 
Abstract  Company  of  Cleveland,  Ohio,  as  title  examiner.  Miss  Kynas- 
ton is  an  able  attorney,  whose  preparatory  education  and  professional 
training  has  been  very  thorough  and  complete.  She  studied  extensively 
both  in  this,  country  and  abroad.  She  was  educated  in  the  University  of 
Missouri,  Prague  University,  of  Prague,  Bohemia,  and  the  Conservatory 
of  Music  at  Leipsic,  Germany,  and  also  took  special  instruction  on  the 
violin  and  piano  in  Paris,  France.  Altogether  she  studied  for  six  years 
in  Europe.  Before  going  to  Cleveland,  Ohio,  she  was  associated  with 
Attorney  Ben  Hardin  of  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  for  some  years. 

Mr.  Kynaston's  second  marriage  was  with  Mrs.  Lavonia  A.  Ryan, 


346  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

June  29,  1915.  She  was  the  widow  of  the  late  Thomas  Ryan,  and  to 
her  marriage  with  Mr.  Ryan  was  born  the  following  children:  Lloyd 
T.,  a  railroad  man  of  Council  Bluffs,  Iowa;  H.  Edwin,  of  the  firm  of 
Kelliher  and  Ryan  Printing  Company,  Moberly,  Mo.,  and  Gus  R.,  credit 
man  for  the  D.  M.  Ferry  Seed  Company,  Detroit,  Mich. 

Mrs.  Kynaston  is  a  daughter  of  James  R.  and  Margaret  L.  (Barkley) 
Robertson,  a  prominent  pioneer  family  of  Missouri.  James  R.  Robertson 
was  born  in  Greene  County,  Tenn.,  and  settled  in  Sugar  Creek  town- 
ship, Randolph  County,  about  1865.  He  moved  to  Moberly  in  1880,  and 
died  here  in  1891.  His  wife  was  bom  in  Rheatown,  Tenn.,  and  died 
here  in  1915.  The  remains  of  both  father  and  mother  are  interred  in 
Oakland  Cemetery.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
George  Robertson,  deceased,  who  was  a  prominent  attorney  of  Mexico, 
Mo.,  and  for  many  years  was  attorney  for  the  Wabash  railroad,  and 
he  also  wrote  a  history  of  Audrain  County ;  Mrs.  Laura  Doran,  deceased ; 
Emma,  married  Washington  Robertson,  and  is  now  deceased;  Martha, 
married  J.  C.  Brown,  St.  Louis,  Mo. ;  Jesse  F.  Robertson,  is  now  pro- 
bate judge  of  Nodaway  County,  Mo.;  Bertha,  married  W.  S.  Zittle,  Omaha, 
Neb.;  Joseph  A.,  now  retired,  living  in  Buffalo,  Okla. ;  Mrs.  John  F. 
Kynaston,  of  this  review. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kynaston  are  extensively  and  favonably  known  in 
Moberly  and  Randolph  County  and  have  the  confidence  and  high  esteem 
of  the  entire  community. 

W.  W.  Hutsell,  one  of  the  leading  agriculturists  of  Randolph  County 
is  descended  from  a  fine  old  Kentucky  family  whose  members  became 
pioneer  settlers  of  Missouri  when  this  state  was  considered  to  be  m  the 
frontier.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Randolph  County,  bom  in  Union  town- 
ship, March  21,  1870,  the  son  of  John  W.  and  Imilda  Ruth  (Eubanks) 
Hutsell,  the  former  also  bom  in  Union  township. 

Bloomfield  Hutsell,  father  of  John  W.,  came  to  this  county  in  1837 
and  located  on  government  land  which  he  farmed  for  many  years ;  he  died 
in  1884.  There  were  three  children  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  W.  Hut- 
sell: James  D.,  of  Union  township;  Annie  May,  the  wife  of  Sanford 
Bennett,  who  lives  on  the  old  homestead,  and  W.  W.,  of  this  review. 

W.  W.  Hutsell  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  received  his  edu- 
cational advantages  in  the  schools  of  Cottage  Grove  district.  He  then 
engaged  in  the  furniture  business  in  Moberly,  where  he  built  up  a  fine 
trade  and  was  recognized  as  one  of  the  sound  and  substantial  business 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  347 

men  of  the  city.  Mr.  Hutsell  decided  to  buy  a  farni  and  return  to  an  open 
outdoor  life,  for  he  had  become  a  good  practical  farmer  while  a  boy  on 
the  home  place  and  it  was  a  business  with  which  he  was  familiar.  He 
purchased  the  farm  owned  by  W.  A.  Norton,  which  consisted  of  126 
acres.  From  first  locating  here  Mr.  Hutsell  began  to  make  -improvfements 
and  buy  modern  farm  implements  with  which  to  increase  production  and 
also  lighten  the  farm  work.  In  1918  he  built  his  present  house  of  seven 
rooms,  equipped  with  acetelyne  lights,  running  water  and  now  has  gas 
power  machines  on  the  place.  His  residence  is  a  handsome  place  on  the 
road  which  runs  from  Moberly  to  Macon  and  is  one  of  the  show  places  of 
this  section,  neatly  kept  and  cared  for.  This  farm  is  an  old  place,  cjitered 
by  John  G.  Cochran,  when  land  sold  by  the  government  for  $1.25  an  acre. 
In  1919  Mr.  Hutsell  rebuilt  his  barn  40x40  feet  which  is  well  equipped  for 
stock  and  grain  storage.     There  are  four  fine  wells  on  the  place. 

In  1897,  Mr.  Hutsell  was  married  to  Miss  Stella  Vince  of  Union  town- 
ship, who  died  in  1907,  and  on  Sept.  17,  1917,  Mr.  Hutsell  married  Miss 
Jessie  Bailey,  a  daughter  of  J.  0.  and  Jessie  (Davis)  Bailey,  both  of  whom 
now  reside  at  Kirksville,  Mo.  Mrs.  Hutsell  was  educated  in  the  schools 
of  Kirksville  and'  the  State  Normal  School  at  Columbia,  Mo.  and  for  seven 
years  before  her  marriage  taught  English  in  the  high  school  at  Moberly. 
She  is  one  of  the  highly  cultured  women  of  the  county  and  is  always 
ready  to  assist  with  time  and  money  in  any  worthy  movement,  in  which 
she  is  ably  supported  by  her  husband,  one  of  the  progressive  and  prosper- 
ous men  of  this  part  of  the  county. 

R.  F.  Pigiott,  owner  and  manager  of  the  Pigott  Coal  Company  of 
Moberly,  was  born  in  Quincy,  111.,  July  13,  1867,  and  is  the  son  of  Peter 
and  Joannah  (Cotter)  Pigott,  both  born  in  Europe.  They  came  to  this 
country  when  young  and  were  married  at  Lambertville,  N.  J.,  and  came 
west,  locating  in  Illinois,  where  Mr.  Pigott  was  employed  in  railroad  work 
for  many  years.  He  resigned  and  came  to  Missouri  in  1870,  buying  land 
in  Chariton  County  where  he  and  his  wife  lived  the  rest  of  their  lives. 
She  died  in  1886  and  was  buried  at  Salisbury,  Mo.  Mr.  Pigott  was  a 
veteran  of  the  Civil  War  as  he  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army  and 
served  three  years.  He  died  in  1898  and  was  buried  in  Salisbury.  There 
were  six  children  in  the  family :  Mrs.  Mary  Burke,  of  Higbee ;  Mrs.  Susie 
Windsor,  of  Moberly;  Mrs.  Kate  Bardotte,  of  Salisbury,  Mo. ;  J.  M.,  on  the 
farm  in  Chariton  County,  Mo. ;  R.  F.,  of  this  review,  and  Peter,  deceased. 

Mr.  Pigott  was  reared  near  Salisbury,  Mo.  and  attended  the  Salis- 


348  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

bury  schools.  He  worked  on  the  railroad  for  eight  years  but  at  the 
death  of  his  brother  returned  to  the  home  place  and  remained  \/ith  his 
parents  until  they  died  when  he  bought  the  homestead.  Later  Mr.  Pigott 
came  to  Moberly  and  formed  a  partnership  with  W.  E.  Eastwood,  open- 
ing a  wholesale  and  retail  coal  business  here.  About  a  year  later,  Mr. 
Pigott  disposed  of  his  interest  to  his  partner  to  take  a  position  on  the 
road  for  the  well  known  Peabody  Coal  Company,  of  Chicago,  and  re- 
mained with  that  concern  two  years.  He  then  opened  a  coal  yard  in 
Centralia  and  Paris,  Mo.,  and  now  conducts  three  coal  yards.  The  Pigott 
Coal  Company  handles  in  the  retail  department  about  400  cars  of  coal  and 
an  equal  number  in  the  jobbing  branch.  All  the  yards  carry  the  best 
grades  of  Illinois  coal  and  Pennsylvania  anthracite  and  the  business  has 
been  successful  from  its  inception.  Mr.  Pigott  is  a  straightforward  busi- 
ness man,  square  in  his  dealings  and  today  is  rated  as  one  of  the  sub- 
stantial men  of  the  community. 

Nov.  19,  1887,  Mr.  Pigott  married  Miss  Laura  Tillotson  of  Salisbury, 
the  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Martha  (Fennell)  Tillotson,  the  former  living 
in  Salisbury,  Mo.,  where  he  was  born  more  than  84  years  ago.  The 
mother  died  in  1919.  There  are  four  children  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pigott: 
H.  L.,  assitant  ticket  agent  for  the  Wabash  railroad  in  Moberly;  Mamie 
A.,  the  wife  of  Perry  H.  Hawes,  of  Moberly;  Ruth,  the  wife  of  Charles 
Milham,  of  Moberly,  and  Naomi,  at  home. 

Mr.  Pigott  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  the  Modern  Woodmen. 

Alexander  B.  McCoy,  judge  of  the  eastern  district  of  Randolph 
County,  who  has  been  a  resident  of  Moberly  for  50  years,  is  one  of  the 
well-known  and  prominent  men  of  the  county  and  city.  He  is  a  Penn- 
sylvanian,  bom  in  Mifflin  County,  April  5,  1850,  the  son  of  Alexander 
and  Nancy  (Glass)  McCoy,  the  former  born  in  the  same  county  as  his 
son  in  1813.  He  came  west  and  located  in  Moberly  in  1876,  then  removed 
to  Sedgwick  County,  Kan.,  where  his  wife  died,  and  soon  after  this  be- 
reavement, Mr.  McCoy  went  to  the  state  of  Oregon,  where  he  remained 
three  years  before  returning  to  Moberly.  Subsequently  he  entered  the 
Soldiers'  Home  at  Dayton,  Ohio,  as  he  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War. 
He  enlisted  in  the  48th  Ohio  Volunteer  Infantry  and  sej-ved  two  years 
before  being  discharged  for  disability.  Later  he  recovered  his  health  and 
re-enlisted  in  the  47th  Ohio  Cavalry  and  was  sent  west  under  Colonel 
Collins  to  fight  the  Indians  in  Idaho  and  Wyoming,  during  the  Indian 


HISTORY  OF  KANDOLPH   COUNTY  349 

uprising  following  the  close  of  the  war.  Mr.  McCoy  died  at  the  home 
in  1898,  a  man  of  years  and  honor. 

There  were  nine  children  in  the  McCoy  family:  John,  died  in  Cali- 
fornia in  1910;  William,  also  died  there  in  1908;  Reed,  a  veteran  of  the 
Civil  War,  died  at  Hillsboro,  Ohio,  in  1865,  from  disease  contracted  in 
the  army;  George,  died  in  Oklahoma  in  1885;  James,  died  in  Salem,  Ore., 
in  1890 ;  the  above  five  sons  and  their  father  all  were  veterans  of  the  Civil 
War  serving  in  the  Union  army.  Alexander,  of  this  review;  Albert,  died 
in  Mason  City,  la.,  in  1906 ;  Mary,  who  married  Edward  Fenner,  is  dead ; 
and  Emma,  the  wife  of  Cyrus  Shafer.  The  McCoy  family  moved  to  Ohio 
when  Alexander  B.  McCoy  was  a  boy  and  it  was  in  that  state  he  was 
reared  and  educated. 

In  1868  Mr.  McCoy  came  to  Missouri,  locating  at  Gallatin,  Davis 
County,  where  he  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  with  A.  C.  Ball,  and 
worked  two  years  and  nine  months  for  $5  a  month.  He  was  in  Gallatin 
when  the  James  brothers  killed  the  banker  with  the  intention  of  rob- 
bing the  bank.  He  was  one  of  the  posse  that  started  after  the  robbers, 
as  he  and  another  man  took  the  horses  Judge  McCoy  was  driving  and 
started  in  pursuit.  The  James  brothers  eluded  the  sheriff's  posse  and 
taking  a  back  trail  met  the  judge  and  his  companion,  both  sides  opened 
fire,  but  the  James  men  got  away. 

In  1871,  Alexander  McCoy  came  to  Moberly,  to  engage  in  the  car- 
penter business  here,  but  a  year  and  a  half  later  accepted  a  position  in 
the  Wabash  shops,  where  he  worked  until  1903.  He  began  to  learn  the 
pattern  maker's  trade  soon  after  coming  here.  He  saved  his  money  and 
invested  it  in  a  farm  west  of  Moberly  and  it  was  while  on  his  farm  on 
a  "lay  off"  in  1903  that  his  wife  was  killed  at  the  Coates  street  crossing. 
Soon  after  this  bereavement  Judge  McCoy  sold  his  farm  and  for  four 
years  was  associated  with  Robert  Haynes  in  the  grocery  business.  In 
1908  Mr.  McCoy  went  west  on  a  pleasure  trip,  visiting  Arizona,  Califor- 
nia and  other  Pacific  coast  states,  and  after  his  return  to  Moberly  in 
1910,  the  judge  built  his  present  fine  residence,  located  at  320  Burkhart 
street.    This  is  one  of  the  fine  homes  of  Moberly. 

From  first  locating  in  this  city  Judge  McCoy  had  taken  an  active 
interest  in  civic  affairs  and  in  1914  was  elected  county  judge  of  the 
eastern  district.  He  was  re-elected  in  1916  and  again  in  1918  and  is  now 
serving  his  third  term. 


350  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

In  1874,  Alexander  McCoy  was  married  to  Miss  Jennie  Thompson 
of  Moberly,  who  was  killed  in  1903,  as  above  stated,  leaving  two  chil- 
dren; H.  A.,  of  Moberly,  whose  biography  appears  in  this  'volume;  Bertha, 
married  William  Stephens,  of  Moberly.  In  1907,  Judge  McCoy  married 
Miss  Jennie  Coffee,  of  Moberly,  who  was  bom  in  Iowa,  and  came  here 
some  years  ago  with  her  widowed  mother. 

Judge  McCoy  has  been  a  member  of  the  Carpenter's  Union  for  many 
years.  He  has  done  much  for  the  benefit  of  the  county  as  the  County 
Sanatorium  has  been  built  at  Huntsville  since  he  was  installed  in  office. 
He  is  a  man  of  high  moral  standard  and  one  of  whom  the  county  may 
well  be  proud.  For  many  years  the  judge  has  commanded  the  respect  of 
men  of  all  political  parties  for  his  fair  dealing. 

Milton  M.  Marshall,  one  of  the  leading  grocery  merchants  of  Moberly, 
who  is  also  justice  of  the  peace,  is  one  of  the  men  who  stand  high  in 
this  community.  He  is  a  native  son,  born  in  Randolph  County,  Sept.  22, 
1866,  the  son  of  J.  D.  and  Susan  (Martin)  Marshall,  the  former  a  native 
of  Albermarle  County,  Va.,  and  the  mother  was  bom  in  Kentucky.  The 
father  died  in  his  76th  year  and  his  wife  died  when  she  was  64  years 
old.  J.  D.  Marshall  was  a  wagon  maker  and  blacksmith,  but  after  set- 
tling in  the  west  he  located  on  a  farm  where  he  spent  the  remainder  of 
his  life.  Six  children  were  bom  to  J.  D.  Marshall  and  wife :  J.  W.,  of 
Higbee;  John,  of  Monroe  County;  Milton,  of  this  review;  Aubrey,  of 
Las  Animos,  Colo.;  Zenobia,  of  Moberly  and  Kenton,  deceased. 

Milton  M.  Marshall  was  reared  on  his  parent's  farm  and.  attended 
school  at  Renick,  Mo.,  where  he  laid  the  foundation  for  a  good  prac- 
tical education,  and  when  old  enough  he  began  to  work  on  the  railroad, 
being  first  employed  by  the  Wabash,  and  later  by  the  Chicago  and  Alton, 
and  then  accepting  a  position  with  the  Burlington  Railroad.  Thus  for 
sixteen  years,  he  was  associated  with  various  departments  of  the  rail- 
road business  until  he  lost  his  right  ami  in  an  accident  in  1887.  This 
great  handicap,  however,  did  not  discourage  him  and  Mr.  Marshall  went 
ahead  and  made  a  success.  This  injury  has  caused  trouble  for  many 
years  and  in  1914  it  was  necessary  to  take  off  all  the  arm  and  later  the 
shoulder  blade.  After  leaving  the  railroad,  Mr.  Marshall  studied  phar- 
macy and  was  engaged  in  the  drug  business  for  14  years  at  Clark,  Mo., 
where  he  built  up  a  fine  trade.  Five  years  ago  he  sold  his  store  in  Clark 
and  came  to  Moberly  to  open  his  present  grocery  business,  purchasing 
the  store  building  and  residence  adjoining  at  300  William  street.     Mr. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  351 

Marshall  was  appointed  justice  of  the  peace  to  fill  the  unexpired  term 
of  Everett  Hamilton,  deceased,  and  after  that  was  elected  to  office  In 
1918. 

On  Oct.  6,  1891,  Mr.  Marshall  was  married  to  Miss  Hattie  Kim- 
borough.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Henry  and  Elizabeth  (Ferguson)  Kim- 
borough,  of  Renick,  Mo.  Henry  Kimborough  is  a  well-known  merchant 
of  that  town,  born  there  in  1836,  the  son  of  John  Stewart  Kimborough, 
a  pioneer  settler  of  Missouri,  who  came  here  at  an  early  day  and  entered 
government  land,  two  and  a  half  miles  west  of  Clark.  He  was  a  veteran 
of  the  Black  Hawk  War.  Two  of  Mr.  Marshall's  uncles  were  veterans  of 
the  Civil  War,  enlisting  from  Renick.  Two  children  have  been  born 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marshall :  Nadine,  the  wife  of  Ray  Galbreath,  of  Mober- 
ly,  and  Freda,  who  holds  a  position  with  the  Wolff-Berger  Company,  of 
Moberly.  She  is  a  graduate  of  Mrs.  Stewart's  School  of  Music.  Mr. 
Marshall's  fraternal  affiliations  are  with  the  Masonic  Lodge  and  the 
Maccabees. 

Hamp  M.  Nise,  one  of  Moberly's  prosperous  business  men,  is 
engaged  in  furnace  and  sheet  metal  work  with  a  shop  at  106  East  Car- 
penter street.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Missouri,  born  at  Renick,  May  3, 
1870,  the  son  of  P.  H.  and  Laura  (Myrtle)  Nise,  the  former  bom  in  Paris, 
Mo.,  in  1843,  the  son  of  A.  H.  Nise,  who  was  a  native  of  Germany.  He 
came  to  the  United  States  when  a  young  man.  He  was  a  tinner  by 
trade,  and  after  reaching  this  country  located  in  Paris,  Mo.,  where  he 
was  in  business  for  many  years.  There  were  five  children  in  his  family: 
P.  H.,  of  Moberly;  Mollie,  W.  T.,  Charles  Augustus  and  Rosa,  all  of  Mo- 
berly, and  by  a  second  marriage,  to  Margaret  Gurin,  there  were  three 
children:     Fannie,  Ernest  and  Oscar. 

When  the  Civil  War  was  precipitated  P.  H.  Nise  enlisted  in  the  Con- 
federate army  from  this  state.  He  was  captured  after  six  months  serv- 
ice and  taken  to  St.  Louis,  confined  in  a  prison  that  formerly  was  Mc- 
Dowell College  and  later  he  was  transferred  to  Alton,  111.  Taking  the 
oath  of  allegiance  to  the  United  States,  six  months  later  he  was  released 
and  in  1871  came  to  Moberly  to  open  the  hardware  and  implement  busi- 
ness which  he  owned  and  managed  for  40  years.  In  1869,  P.  H.  Nise 
was  married  to  Miss  Laura  Myrtle  of  Renick,  Mo.,  who  died  in  1899,  leav- 
ing the  following  children:  Hamp  M.,  of  this  review;  Elgie,  the  wife  of 
John  Curry,  of  Moberly,  and  Alma  and  Elma,  twins,  the  former  now  de- 
ceased, the  latter  is  the  wife  of  Beijamin  Padget,  of  St.  Louis. 


352  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Hamp  M.  Nise  was  reared  in  Moberly  and  attended  the  public  schools. 
He  entered  his  father's  hardware  store  and  worked  for  him  for  about  20 
years.  When  the  father  retired  from  active  business  Hamp  M.  Nise 
opened  his  present  sheet  metal  shop  and  furnace  and  heating  establish- 
ment in  1906,  and  from  its  initiation  he  has  been  doing  a  good  business, 
having  associated  with  him  his  son,  Robert,  who  is  one  of  the  younger 
generation  of  business  men  of  the  city. 

In  1895,  Mr.  Nise  was  married  to  Miss  Blanche  Morris,  of  Moberly, 
the  daughter  of  George  W.  and  Arabella  (Deyoung)  Morris,  both  now 
deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nise  have  had  two  children":  Morris  H.,  born 
in  1898,  attended  the  local  schools  and  graduated  from  the  high  school 
in  1914.  When  war  was  declared  against  Germany  he  enlisted  at  Coffey- 
ville,  Kan.,  in  the  18th  Balloon  Company,  and  was  sent  to  Fort  Omaha 
for  his  training.  He  sailed  for  overseas  duty  in  October  of  the  same 
year.  Being  assigned  to  service  in  France,  he  was  at  the  front  for  many 
months  and  was  killed  in  an  accident  April  13,  1919,  giving  the  greatest 
gift  he  had,  his  life,  that  the  world  might  be  m.ade  a  safe  place  for  the 
future  generations.    Robert  D.  is  at  home  with  his  parents. 

W.  J.  Stamm,  now  living  retired  in  Moberly,  was  for  several  years 
actively  identified  with  the  business  interests  of  this  city.  Mr.  Stamm 
was  born  in  St.  Louis,  Jan.  18,  1856,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Kath- 
rine  (Shafer)  Stamm,  both  natives  of  Germany.  William  Stamm,  the 
father  came  to  St.  Louis  in  1844.  He  served  in  the  Union  army  through- 
out the  Civil  War.  After  the  war  he  worked  at  his  trade,  which  was 
that  of  a  blacksmith.  He  died  at  Palmer,  111.,  at  the  age  of  66  years, 
and  his  remains  are  buried  there.  His  wife  survived  him  for  a  number 
of  years  and  died  Dec.  22,  1913,  at  Palmer,  111.,  and  her  remains  are 
also  buried  at  Palmer.  William  and  Kathrine  (Shafer)  Stamm  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  William  J.,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Elizabeth,  married  John  Logon,  of  Wichita,  Kan.;  Henry,  Mo- 
berly, Mo.;  Anna,  married  Earnest  Stockman,  Tailorville,  111.;  Carrie, 
married  Irvin  Doroner,  Palmer,  111.;  Ed,  Palmer,  111.;  and  George,  died 
at  Sedgwick,  Kan. 

William  J.  Stamm  has  made  his  own  way  in  life  since  he  was  nine 
years  old.  In  early  life  he  worked  at  various  jobs  and  received  the 
sum  0^  25  cents  per  week  herding  cattle.  In  1880,  he  engaged  in  the 
retail  liquor  business  at  Litchfield,  111.,  and  remained  in-  that  business 
there  until  1894,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  bought  the  Anthony 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  353 

Cafe  at  206  North  Clark  street.  He  conducted  that  place  until  1907, 
when  he  sold  it  and  engaged  in  the  wholesale  cigar  and  tobacco  busi- 
ness and  the  manufacturing  of  candy  in  Moberly  under  the  firm  name 
Stamm  and  Son,  in  partnership  with  his  son,  WiUiam  Stamm,  Jr.  They 
successfully  conducted  this  business  until  1910,  when  Mr.  Stamm  re- 
tired and  has  not  been  actively  engaged  in  business  since. 

In  July  2,  1881,  William  J.  Stamm  was  united  in  marriage  with 
Miss  Elizabeth  Bergschneider,  of  Harvel,  111.  She  is  a  native  of  that 
state,  bom  in  1857.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stamm  was  bom  one  son,  William, 
Jr.,  bom  at  Litchfield,  111.,  April  4,  1882,  and  died  in  1917,  at  the  age 
of  86  years.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Illinois  and  Mo- 
berly. He  then  took  a  four  years'  course  in  Blees'  Military  School,  at 
Macon,  Mo.,  and  afterwards  attended  an  electrical  engineering  school 
at  Washington,  D.  C.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Rail- 
road Company,  as  assistant  to  the  chief  clerk  at  Moberly  for  a  time, 
and  then  engaged  in  the  shoe  business  at  Kansas  City,  Mo.  He  sold 
out  that  business  and  engaged  in  the  wholesale  cigar  and  tobacco  and 
candy  business  in  partnership  with  his  father  at  Moberly.  While  en- 
gaged in  this  business  his  health  failed  and  he  was  forced  to  give  up 
business.  He  visited  various  climates  in  the  hope  of  regaining  his  health, 
but  to  no  avail.  He  was  an  energetic  and  capable  business  man  and 
made  many  friends  in  the  business  world.  He  was  married  to  Anna 
Mann,  of  Alton,  111.,  and  three  children  were  born  to  this  union:  Mar- 
cella,  Alouise  and  Beatrice,  who  are  being  reared  by  their  grandparents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stamm. 

Mr.  Stamm  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks  and  one  of  the  stubstantial  and  highly  respected  citizens  of 
Moberly.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Travelers'  Protective  Association  and 
has  been  a  delegate  to  the  National  Convention,  attended  several  times. 

Chester  S.  Wilhite,  junior  member  of  the  Nise  &  Company,  of  Mo- 
berly, was  bom  in  Howard  County,  in  1897,  the  son  of  W.  S.  and  Sallie 
(Noel)  Wilhite,  both  of  whom  reside  in  Moberly.  The  former  was  born 
in  Cass  County  and  the  mother  in  Brown  County,  111.,  though  they, were 
married  in  Howard  County,  Mo.,  in  1894. 

W.  S.  Wilhite  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  as 
car  inspector  for  14  years  at  Moberly.  There  were  four  children  in  the 
family:  Walter,  a  clerk  for  the  J.  C.  Penny  Company,  of  Moberly;  Mary, 
now  Mrs.  Williams,  of  St.  Louis;  Ova  May,  at  home,  and  Chester,  who 


354  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

received  his  education  in  the  pubUc  schools  of  Howard  County  and  later 
in  Moberly.  When  he  was  12  years  old  he  began  to  work  for  O.  R.  Nise, 
as  delivery  boy  for  the  grocery,  and  four  years  later  he  became  a  clerk 
in  the  store.  He  was  ambitious  to  get  ahead  in  the  world,  saved  his 
money  and  in  1919,  when  Mr.  Nise  needed  a  partner  for  his  growing  busi- 
ness, purchased  an  interest  in  the  grocery  and  meat  market.  They 
carry  a  full  line  of  all  kinds  of  fancy  and  staple  groceries  and  good  line 
of  meats  and  have  a  good  business. 

In  Aug.,  1918,  Mr.  Wilhite  was  married  to  Miss  Emma  Paulette  Mil- 
ler, of  Moberly,  the  daughter  of  W.  E.  and  Caroline  Miller,  the  former 
deceased,  and  his  widow  resides  here.  Mr.  Wilhite  enlisted  on  Oct.  1, 
1918,  for  services  in  the  World  War  and  was  sent  to  Camp  Bowie,  Tex., 
for  training.  He  was  there  six  months  and  after  the  armistice  was  signed 
was  given  his  honorable  discharge  April  1,  1919,  and  returning  home  and 
resumed  his  business.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American  Legion,  Theo- 
dore Bazan  Post,  Moberly,  and  also  belongs  to  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose. 
Today  he  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  best  business  men  of  the  younger 
generation  in  the  city. 

Temple  Stephens,  a  successful  grocer  of  Moberly,  was  born  at  Water- 
loo, Neb.,  Dec.  29,  1889,  the  son  of  Lewis  L.,  who  is  the  scion  of  a  pio- 
neer family  that  came  west  from  Kentucky  at  an  early  day. 

Lewis  L.  Stephens  was  born  near  Middle  Grove,  Mo.,  in  1843,  the 
son  of  Thomas  Nelson  and  Mary  (Swindell)  Stephens,  the  latter  bom  in 
Virginia  in  1818  and  died  in  1895.  The  father  was  a  native  of  Kenton, 
County,  Ky.,  bom  in  1808.  He  was  reared  and  educated  in  his  native 
state  and  when  old  enough  to  start  life  independently  rode  through  the 
country  on  horseback  to  Missouri.  He  arrived  in  this  state  in  1832  and 
entered  government  land  in  Monroe  County,  taking  up  a  large  tract. 
His  father,  William  Stephens,  also  came  here  about  the  same  time  and 
entered  land.  The  patent  issued  to  him  was  signed  by  President  Andrew 
Jackson.  Both  William  and  Thomas  Stephens  spent  the  remainder  of 
their  lives  in  Monroe  County,  the  former  passing  away  in  1873,  aged 
90  years,  and  the  son  died  in  his  79th  year.  There  were  the  following 
children  in  the  Stephens  family:  Lewis  L.,  J.  C,  of  Columbus,  Mo.; 
James  T.,  of  Moberly ;  Lena,  now  Mrs.  Bassett ;  Leonard,  of  Middle  Grove ; 
Kent  K.,  of  Paris,  and  Ida,  now  Mrs.  Noel,  of  Kansas  City. 

Lewis  L.  Stephens,  the  father  of  Temple  Stephens,  of  this  review, 
was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  received  his  educational  advan- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  355 

tages  in  the  private  schools  maintained  in  the  county  at  that  period  and 
when  only  18  years  of  age  enlisted  in  Monroe  County  in  a  company  raised 
and  commanded  by  Captain  Brace  of  Paris,  Mo.,  to  serve  in  the  Con- 
federate army.  Mr.  Stephens  was  in  the  service  throughout  the  war, 
was  in  many  important  skirmishes  in  Arkansas,  Mississippi,  Georgia  and 
Alabama.  He  participated  in  many  of  the  important  battles,  including 
Lexington,  Pea  Ridge,  Ark.,  Baker's  Creek,  Miss.,  Vicksburg,  Kenasaw 
Mountain,  Atlanta  and  Altoona,  where  he  was  wounded  Oct.  5,  1865,  and 
was  paroled  at  Jackson,  Miss.  Just  after  the  close  of  the  war  he  located 
in  Douglas  County,  Neb.,  not  far  from  Omaha,  and  engaged  in  farming 
and  merchandising  for  30  years.  In  1895  Mr.  Stephens  retired  from  the 
active  management  of  his  affairs  and  came  to  Moberly  to  open  a  store, 
which  he  disposed  of  in  November,  1918,  and  his  son  now  has  charge  as 
owner. 

Lewis  L.  Stephens  was  married  in  Douglas  County,  Neb.,  on  Nov. 
12,  1874,  to  Miss  Harriet  Concannon,  a  native  of  Indiana,  the  daughter 
of  the  Rev.  Thomas  and  Rhoda  (Hathaway)  Concannon,  the  former  a 
minister  of  the  Christian  Church,  and  both  natives  of  Miami  County, 
Ohio.  One  son  was  bom  to  this  union,  Temple,  who  was  reared  in  child- 
hood in  Nebraska,  then  when  the  family  came  to  Moberly  he  attended 
the  public  schools  here,  later  going  to  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  where  he  took 
special  studies  and  voice  training.  Following  this  Mr.  Stephens  was  en- 
gaged for  concert  work  by  the  Ridpath  Lyceum  Bureau,  as  a  tenor  solo- 
ist and  spent  the  time  on  their  Chatauqua  circuit.  One  season  he  spent 
with  a  cathedral  choir  of  eight  people,  winning  a  high  reputation  for  his 
skill  as  a  musician.  In  1918,  when  his  father  retired  from  business,  Mr. 
Stephens  returned  to  Moberly  to  assume  charge  of  it  and  became  the 
owner-manager  of  the  store  at  709  South  William  street. 

On  April  12,  1916,  Mr.  Stephens  married  Miss  Alma  Smith,  the 
daughter  of  John  and  Emily  Smith,  of  Moberly.  Mr.  Stephens  is  one 
of  the  young  business  men  of  Moberly  who  is  rapidly  winning  a  high 
place  in  the  commercial  circles  of  the  city,  where  he  has  taken  an  active 
part  in  civic  affairs.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Modem  Woodmen  and  the 
Moberly  Country  Club. 

Samuel  Martin,  a  successful  farmer  and  stockman  of  Randolph 
County,  was  bom  in  Pennsylvania,  March  9,  1851,  the  son  of  William 
and  Sarah  (Thompson)  Martin,  who  came  west  in  1879  and  located  near 
Renick  on  a  farm,  where  they  passed  the  remainder  of  their  lives.    The 


356  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

mother  died  in  1887  and  the  father  in  1898.  They  were  the  parents  of 
the  f  oho  wing  children:  John,  deceased;  Richard,  deceased;  Samuel,  of 
this  review ;  Mrs.  Jane  Yontz,  deceased ;  Anna  Yontz,  of  Moberly ;  Thomas, 
who  lives  in  Iowa,  and  Reed. 

Samuel  Martin  spent  his  youth  in  his  native  state,  was  given  the 
educational  advantages  of  the  public  schools  there  and  engaged  in  farm- 
ing. He  came  west  in  1880,  locating  first  near  Renick,  then  moved  to 
Cooper  County,  where  he  lived  for  several  years,  but  subsequently  re- 
turned to  Randolph  County  and  purchased  his  present  place,  two  miles 
east  of  Moberly,  in  1891.  It  consists  of  a  160  acres,  being  part  of  a 
farm  enteied  from  the  government  by  a  man  named  Derrett,  who  is 
buried  on  the  place.  Later  the  farm  was  owned  by  J.  T.  Coates,  whose 
heirs  still  own  some  900  acres  of  land  in  the  vicinity  of  Moberly.  Mr. 
Martin  has  placed  many  good  improvements  on  his  land  since  acquiring 
it.  He  Jbuilt  his  present  fine  home,  a  large  barn  and  other  outbuildings 
for  farm  use.  The  place  has  fine  water  and  is  underlaid  by  a  coal  vein 
which  may  prove  valuable  when  opened  up.  Since  coming  here  Mr. 
Martin  has  been  engaged  in  general  farming  and  raises  cattle,  hogs  and 
mules. 

On  Oct.  22,  1874,  Mr.  Martin  was  married  to  Miss  Agnes  Mont- 
gomery, the  daughter  of  John  and  Catharine  (Majinsey)  Montgomery, 
both  of  whom  were  born  in  Ireland,  coming  to  America  they  first  set- 
tled in  Pittsburg,  Pa.,  but  later  moved  to  Butler  County,  Pa.,  where  they 
spent  the  rest  of  their  lives.  Eleven  children  have  been  born  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Martin:  W.  J.,  of  Milton,  Mo.;  Mrs.  C.  W.  O'Neal,  Moberly; 
J.  K.,  accidentally  killed  at  Muskogee,  Okla.;  Mrs.  H.  R.  Winters,  of 
Moberly;  Mrs.  C.  W.  Manley,  deceased;  Mrs.  Hubert  Cowgill,  of  Kirks- 
ville.  Mo. ;  Albert,  deceased,  was  for  14  years  a  clerk  in  the  Moberly  post- 
office;  Herbert,  of  Moberly;  Mrs.  Henry  Fennell,  of  Moberly;  Frank,  on 
the  home  place,  and  Eva,  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin  have  17  grand- 
children. The  Martins  are  one  of  the  finest  families  of  the  county, 
who  by  their  hard  work  have  overcome  difficulties  and  reared  a  family 
that  is  an  asset  to  the  citizenship  of  Randolph  County  and  the  state, 
whose  worth  to  the  country  can  not  be  estimated  in  dollars  and  cents. 

R.  K.  and  S.  P.  Crose,  proprietors  of  the  Highland  Dairy,  af-e  among 
the  most  successful  dairymen  of  Randolph  County.  The  Highland  Dairy 
Farm  is  situated  in  Sugar  Creek  township,  about  two  miles  northeast 
of  Moberly  and  is  an  ideal  place  for  dairy  purposes.    It  consists  of.  330 


HISTOEY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  357 

acres,  and  since  purchasing  the  place,  in  1914,  the  Crose  brothers  have 
made  extensive  improvements.  One  of  the  first  improvements  was  the 
erection  of  a  large  dairy  barn,  30x100  feet,  with  a  capacity  suitable  for 
53  cows  in  stanchions.  They  have  erected  a  substantial  brick  dairy  house 
and  installed  milking  machines,  bottle  washers  and  a  sterilization  plant. 
The  place  is  supplied  with  power  by  an  electric  motor  and  a  Delco  light- 
ing system  has  been  installed  which  furnishes  light  in  all  of  the  dairy 
buildings  as  well  as  the  residence.  Everything  about  the  place  is  ar- 
ranged with  a  view  of  complying  with"  the  most  modern  methods  of  sani- 
tation and  efficiency.  The  place  is  supplied  with  an  abundance  of  pure 
water  which  is  such  a  necessary  adjunct  to  a  well  conducted  dairy  farm. 

The  Crose  brothers  are  sons  of  Marion  and  Etta  (Jones)  Crose,  the 
former  a  native  of  Indiana  and  the  latter  of  Sugar  Creek  township,  Ran- 
dolph County.  Marion  Crose  came  to  Missouri  in  1872  and  settled  near 
Moberly  in  Randolph  County  and  was  married  here  in  1876.  Etta  Jones 
Crose  was  a  daughter  of  Alexander  Jones,  who  was  one  of  the  very  early 
settlers  of  Randolph  County  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  this 
county  after  locating  here. 

To  Marion  and  Etta  (Jones)  Crose  were  born  the  following  children: 
Alva,  Clinton,  Iowa;  R.  K.,  of  this  review;  J.  B.,  resides  in  Kansas  City; 
S.  P.,  of  this  review;  Susie,  married  A.  J.  Davidson,  of  Moberly;  L.  M., 
a  farmer  and  stockman  of  Sugar  Creek  township,  and  H.  H.,  also  a 
farmer  and  stockman  of  Sugar  Creek  township. 

R.  K.  Crose  was  born  in  Moberly  Sept.  14,  1879,  and  S.  P.  Crose  was 
bom  in  Carlo  township  Sept.  25,  1883.  They  were  both  educated  in  the 
public  schools  and  began  life  as  farmers.  In  1903  they  engaged  in  the 
dairy  business  and  were  associated  together  in  this  enterprise  with  their 
two  brothers,  L.  M.  and  H.  H.  Crose.  This  association  continued  until 
1914,  when  R.  K.  and  S.  P.  purchased  the  interests  of  the  other  two 
brothers  and  have  since  continued  the  dairy  business  as  above  stated. 
The  other  two  brothers  are  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising  and 
all  are  successful  citizens  of  Randolph  County.  The  four  Crose  brothers 
own,  althogether  in  this  county,  over  1,0Q0  acres  of  land. 

R.  K.  Crose  was  united  in  marriage  Nov.  2,  1904,  with  Miss  May 
Wilson,  of  Moberly.  She  is  the  daughter  of  N.  J.  and  Annie  Wilson,  who 
reside  in  Moberly.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Crose  have  been  bom  two  children, 
Russell  and  Lucille. 


358  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Homer  Crose,  a  prominent  farmer  and  stockman  of  Sugar  Creek 
township,  Randolph  County,  is  the  owner-manager  of  the  Hill  Slope  Farm, 
located  two  and  a  half  miles  east  of  Moberly  on  Rural  Route  No.  5. 
He  was  bom  Nov.  19,  1889,  on  what  is  now  known  as  the  Alexander 
Jones  farm  in  Sugar  Creek  township,  the  son  of  Marion  and  Ettie-  (Jones) 
Crose,  a  further  biography  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume  in  the 
sketches  of  the  Crose  brothers.  Homer  Crose  was  reared  on  the  farm 
and  attended  the  public  schools.  In  1903  with  his  three  brothers  he 
engaged  in  the  dairy  business  which  has  proved  successful.  In  1909 
Homer  Crose  purchased  his  present  farm  of  160  acres  from  Adam  Givins, 
and  in  1914,  when  his  brothers  purchased  the  Highland  Dairy,  he  dis- 
posed of  his  interest  in  the  dairy  and  has  since  devoted  his  time  and 
energies  to  the  development  and  management  of  his  farm.  He  has 
made  many  improvements  on  Hill  Slope,  including  his  beautiful  stuccdl 
house,  modern  in  every  manner,  a  fine  new  barn  and  shed  of  the  same 
size  so  that  the  equipment  is  the  finest  and  most  labor  saving  in  the 
county.  He  has  a  garage  for  his  car,  separated  from  the  other  build- 
ings, and  an  excellent  chicken  house  for  his  fine  Buff  Orphington  chick- 
ens in  which  he  takes  great  pride.  Mr.  Crose  has  18  head  of  sheep, 
a  good  grade  of  hogs  and  high-bred  Jersey  and  Holstein  cattle.  For 
some  time  he  has  also  been  running  a  dairy,  but  instead  of  selling  milk 
has  been  making  a  high  grade  of  butter  for  the  market,  which  finds 
a  ready  demand  in  Moberly.  The  farm  is  supplied  with  fine  water  from 
drilled  wells  and  cisterns.  The  residence  is  located  on  the  Middle  Grove 
road,  a  beautiful  site,  and  Mr.  Crose  has  just  about  completed  plans  for 
laying  out  the  grdunds  which  will  make  it  one  of  the  show  places  of 
this  section  of  the  county. 

On  Jan.  18,  1913,  Mr.  Crose  was  married  to  Miss  Lillie  Bryant,  the 
daughter  of  Isaac  and  Lucy  Bryant,  of  Sugar  Creek  township.  They 
are  both  natives  of  England,  who  came  to  this  country  many  years 
ago  and  have  resided  in  Randolph  County  more  than  35  years,  being 
old  and  prominent  residents  here.  Mrs.  Crose  was  born  on  their  farm, 
reared  here,  and  educated  in  the  public  schools.  One  child  has  been 
born  to  this  union,  Herbert,  born  Oct.  24,  1913. 

Mr.  Crose  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  in 
Moberly  and  is  one  of  the  men  who  takes  an  active  part  in  the  civic 
affairs  of  his  community,  always  ready  to  assist  any  movement  for  the 
development  of  the  county. 


HISTOEY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  359 

James  D.  Hutsdl,  proprietor  of  Crystal  Springs  stock  farm  of  Union 
township,  situated  a  mile  and  a  quarter  northeast  of  Moberly,  is  a  pro- 
gressive and  enterprising  stockman  who  is  fortunate  enough  to  own  land 
in  a  particularly  productive  locality.  By  hard  work,  thrift  and  executive 
ability  he  has  accumulated  a  considerable  estate  and  enough  of  the 
world's  goods  to  be  considered  one  of  the  most  substantial  men  of  the 
county.  He  was  bom  a  mile  and  a  quarter  southeast  of  his  present  place, 
Oct.  23,  1866,  the  son  of  J.  W.  and  Milda  (Eubanks)  Hutsell,  the  for- 
mer was  also  bom  in  this  township  in  1839  and  now  lives  on  the  old 
home  place  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  1897.  To  J.  W.  and  Milda 
Hutsell  were  bom  three  children  as  follows:  W.  W.,  a  farmer  of  Sugar 
Creek  township ;  Annie,  the  vvdfe  of  A.  S.  Bennett,  living  with  the  father, 
and  James  D.,  of  this  review. 

James  D.  Hutsell  spent  his  boyhood  days  and  youth  on  his  parent's 
farm  and  attended  the  Cottage  Grove  school,  where  he  laid  the  founda- 
tion for  a  good  practical  education  to  which  he  has  ever  since  added 
by  wide  reading.  Mr.  Hutsell's  first  land  was  a  100-acre  tract  where 
his  residence  now  stands,  purchased  in  1891  of  Henry  Overberg,  of  Mo- 
berly, who  in  turn  had  bought  it  from  Thomas  P.  Coates,  an  early  set- 
tler who  entered  this  tract  May  25,  1835,  so  that  there  have  been  but 
two  transfers  of  this  land  recorded.  Later  Mr.  Hutsell  bought  eighty 
acres  from  John  Bennett  and  he  later  bought  95  acres,  and  his  father 
gave  him  35  acres.  He  is  the  proprietor  of  an  estate  of  310  acres,  125 
of  which  he  farms,  the  rest  being  a  fine  blue  grass  pasture  and  meadow. 
All  the  improvements  on  the  place  have  been  made  by  Mr.  Hutsell,  as 
the  land  was  unbroken  sod  when  he  bought  it.  His  residence  was  erected 
in  1895  and  remodeled  in  1917.  It  is  a  fine  seven-room  home,  modem 
in  every  way,  with  acetalyne  lights  and  running  water.  He  also  built  a 
large  bam  and  a  silo.  One  tenement  house  has  been  built  on  the  place. 
For  many  years  Mr.  Hutsell  has  kept  from  30  to  40  head  of  Shorthorn 
cattle,  annually,  with  a  registered  male  at  the  head  of  the  herd;  his 
hogs  are  the  Poland  China  breed  with  a  registered  male  for  breeding; 
he  has  about  10  head  of  fine  draft  horses,  Clydsdales  and  Percherons, 
of  high  grade.  Mrs.  Hutsell  keeps  a  large  flock  of  Barred  Plymouth 
Rock  chickens  which  most  years  bring  in  good  returns.  A  fine  spring 
supplies  water  on  the  place  and  there  are  also  three  wells. 

On  Sept.  21,  1893,  Mr.  Hutsell  was  married  to  Miss  Laura  Lee,  a 
daughter  of  Henry  L.  and  Lucy  A.   (Mallory)  Lee,  the  former  born  in 


360  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Monroe  County,  Mo.,  in  1845,  and  died  in  1897,  and  the  mother  was  a 
native  of  Henry  County,  Mo.,  bom  in  1847,  and  died  in  1889.  One  son 
has  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hutsell,  J.  Harold,  a  graduate  of  the 
Moberly  High  School,  who  spent  two  years  in  the  agricultural  depart- 
nient  of  the  State  University,  who  is  assuming  the  charge  of  the  home 
farm.  He  was  married  April  12,  1920,  to  Bernice  Poison,  who  was  bom 
near  Jacksonville,  Mo.  The  Hutsell  place  lies  on  the  north  side  of  the 
state  road  and  is  one  of  the  best  kept  and  finest  stock  farms  in  the 
county.  Its  close  proximity  to  Moberly  makes  it  a  most  desirable  loca- 
tion. 

Dr.  Guslav  H.  Jaeger,  a  well  known  and  successful  chiropractor' 
located  at  223  South  Williams  street,  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  Missouri, 
born  on  a  farm  in  Montgomery  County,  July  19,  1873,  the  son  of  Fred- 
erick and  Louisa  (Freltag)  Jaeger. 

Frederick  Jaeger  was  bom  in  Missouri,  and  reared  and  educated 
in  this  state  and  after  reaching  manhood  engaged  in  farming.  He  died 
in  Warren  County,  in  1877,  aged  55  years.  The  mother  of  the  subject 
was  a  native  of  Germany,  who  came  to  this  country  when  a  girl  and 
married  Mr.  Jaeger  in  this  country.  She  died  in  Howard  County  in 
1908.  Frederick  Jaeger  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  having  enlisted 
in  the  Union  army  at  the  outbreak  of  hostilities  and  after  peace  was 
declared  returned  to  Missouri  and  again  engaged  in  agricultural  pur- 
suits, which  he  followed  all  his  life.  There  were  four  children  in  the 
family:  Frederick,  of  St.  Louis,  connected  with  a  lumber  firm;  Otto, 
a  farmer  of  Howard  County;  Dr.  Gustav  H.,  of  this  review,  and  Emma, 
the  wife  of  Paul  Nienkamp,  of  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Dr.  Gustav  H.  Jaeger  received  his  elementary  education  in  the  pub- 
lic schools  near  his  home  and  later  entered  the  Palmer  School  of  Chiroprac- 
tics,  at  Davenport,  Iowa,  where  he  graduated  in  1910,  and  the  same  year 
engaged  in  practice  in  St.  Louis.  Later  he  removed  to  Columbia,  Mo., 
and  in  1912,  he  came  to  Moberly,  being  the  first  chiropractor  to  locate  in 
this  city.  He  has  built  up  a  good  practice  in  Randolph  County  and  his 
practice  is  not  confined  to  its  boundaries,  as  he  has  become  well  and 
favorably  known  professionally  throughout  the  surrounding  countries. 
Dr.  Jaeger  defines  his  work  as  follows :  "Chiropractics  is  the  knowledge 
of  physiology  and  cause  of  disease;  the  science  of  knowing  how  and 
the  art  of  being  able  to  adjust  it." 


DR.  G.   H.   JAEGER 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  361 

Dr.  Jaeger  was  married  in  1894  to  Miss  Rieka  Gruebbel,  of  Warren 
County,  Mo.,  the  daughter  of  Frederick  and  Henrietta  Gruebbel,  both 
decease!.  Two  children  have  been  bom  to  this  union:  Lillie  and  Mar- 
tha, both  at  home. 

Dr.  Jaeger  is  a  man  of  wide  reading  and  one  of  the  successful 
chiropractors  of  the  state,  and  since  coming  to  Moberly  has  taken  an 
active  part  in  the  life  of  the  city,  being  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  and  also  belongs  to  the -Maccabees. 

Dr.  Frank  Leslie  McCormick,  a  well  known  and  successful  physician 
and  surgeon  of  Moberly,  is  a  native  of  Missouri  and  a  descendant  of 
pioneers  of  this  state.  Doctor  McCormick  was  born  in  Macon  County, 
Dec.  25,  1877,  a  son  of  John  S.  and  Cathrine  (Hudson)  McCormick. 
John  S.  McCormick  was  born  near  Winchester,  Frederick  County,  Va., 
Aug.  2,  1836.  He  is  a  son  of  Bushrod  McCormick,  who  came  to  Mis- 
souri from  Virginia  in  1837  and  settled  in  Chariton  township,  Randolph 
County,  and  was  one  of  the  very  early  settlers  of  that  section.  He 
spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  there.  He  died  at  about  65  years  of 
age  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  the  Darksville  Cemetery. 

John  S.  McCormick  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his  parents  when 
he  was  about  one  year  old.  He  grew  to  manhood  in  this  county  and 
when  the  Civil  War  broke  out  he  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  Army 
and  served  under  Gen.  Sterling  Price.  He  is  now  living  retired  at  Mo- 
berly. Susan  Cathrine  (Hudson)  McCormick,  mother  of  Doctor  McCor- 
mick, was  bom  in  Kentucky  in  1846.  Her  mother  died  when  Susan 
Cathrine  was  an  infant  and  when  she  was  about  five  years  of  age  she 
was  brought  to  Randolph  County  by  her  father.  To  John  S.  and  Susan 
Cathrine  (Hudson)  McCormick  were  born  the  following  children:  Mrs. 
Rosa  Wheeler,  deceased;  Mrs.  Etta  Scott  lives  in  Shelby  County,  Mo. ; 
Hattie,  died  in  infancy;  Dr.  Frank  L.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Willie, 
who  died  in  infancy. 

Doctor  McCormick  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Randolph  County  and  later  attended  school  at  College  Mound,  Macon 
County,  and  the  State  Normal  School  at  Chillicothe,  Mo.  He  then  en- 
tered the  Central  Medical  College  at  St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  where  he  was 
graduated  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  in  1904.  In  1902  he- 
attended  Barnes  Medical  College  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.  In  about  1903  he 
took  a  course  in  the  George  Washington  University,  Washington,  D.  C, 
and  afterwards  took  two  post-graduate  courses  at  John  Hopkins   Uni- 


362  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

versity,  Baltimore,  Md.  He  was  then  assistant  surgeon  at  St.  Joseph 
Hospital,  St.  Joseph,  Mo.  In  1904,  Doctor  McCormick  began  the  prac- 
tice of  his  profession  at  Darksville,  Mo.,  and  remained  in  practice  there 
until  1917,  when  he  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  the  practice  here. 
In  September,  1918,  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  World  War  and  was 
assigned  to  the  Medical  Corps  with  the  rank  of  captain  and  sent  to 
Fort  Riley,  Kan.,  where  he  was  stationed  until  his  discharge  in  Novem- 
ber, 1918,  after  the  armistice  was  signed.  He  resumed  his  practice  in 
Moberly  in  September,  1919.  Doctor  McCormick  is  an  able  physician 
and  surgeon  and  is  recognized  as  such,  and  in  the  short  time  that  he 
has  been  a  resident  of  Moberly  he  has  built  up  an  extensive  practice. 

On  Dec.  23,  1907,  Doctor  McCormick  was  united  in  marriage  with 
Miss  Hettie  Mae  Broddurs,  of  Dai'ksville,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Alex 
and  Bettie  (Richmond)  Broddurs,  of  Darkville.  To  Doctor  and  Mrs. 
McCormick  have  been  born  two  children:  Frank  Leslie,  Junior,  and 
William  Harold. 

Doctor  McCormick  was  city  health  officer  when  he  resigned  to  enlist 
for  service  in  the  World  War.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons.  He  has  recently  purchased  the  Doctor  Irvfn  resi- 
dence at  the  corner  of  Morley  street  and  Grand  avenue,  which  is  one  of 
the  fine  homes  of  Moberly. 

August  M.  Willott,  better  known  as  "Gus"  Willott,  is  a  native  of 
Randolph  County.  He  was  born  in  Moberly  Sept.  17,  1873,  and  is  a 
son  of  Windel  and  Margaret  (Tebo)  Willott.  The  Willott  family  were 
among  the  early  settlers  of  Moberly,  coming  here  from  St.  Charles  in 
1871,  at  the  time  when  the  Wabash  shops  were  moved  here  from  St. 
Charles,  49  years  ago,  and  Windel  Willott,  the  father  was  the  first  to 
locate  a  bakery  and  candy  factory  here.  A  more  extensive  history  of 
the  Willott  family  is  given  in  connection  with  a  sketch  of  Ed  A.  Willott, 
which  appears  in  this  volume. 

August  M.  Willott  was  reared  in  Moberly  and  received  his  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools.  He  began  work  at  a  very  early  age  in  order 
to  assist  his  widowed  mother  to  maintain  the  family,  the  father  hav- 
ing died  when  August  M.  was  four  years  old.  His  first  employment  was 
in  the  Wayland  foundry  and  later  he  engaged  in  the  barber  business 
and  for  over  27  years  was  in  that  business  in  Moberly,  in  which  he  was 
associated  with  his  brother,  Ed  A.  Willott.  In  1914,  Mr.  Willott  purchased 
the  Green  Tree  Buffet  at  206  North   Clark  street,  where  he  conducts 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  363 

a  restaurant  and  a  cafe  where  soft  drinks  are  sold.  This  is  one  of 
the  well  known  and  popular  refreshment  places   in  Moberly. 

Mr.  Willott  was  married  May  17,  1894,  to  Miss  Malissa  Frances 
Henthom,  of  Moberly.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Beverly  and  Elizabeth 
Henthorn. 

The  old  home  where  August  M.  Willott  was  born  is  still  stand- 
ing. It  is  located  at  the  corner  of  Burkhart  and  Fourth  streets  and 
has  been  remodeled  and  is  now  owned  by  Oak  Hunter.  Mr.  Willott 
is  one  of  the  widely  known  and  well  liked  men  of  Moberly  and  Ran- 
dolph County. 

John  H.  Holloway,  a  well-known  merchant  of  Moberly,  Mo.,  who 
conducts  a  grocery  store  and  a  meat  market  at  615  South  Fourth  street, 
is  a  native  of  Missouri,  whose  ancestors  were  among  the  very  early 
pioneer  settlers  of  this  state.  Mr.  Holloway  was  born  in  Monroe  County, 
May  7,  1864,  a  son  of  James  S.  and  Zerelda  (Hudson)  Holloway.  James 
S.  Holloway  was  born  in  Kentucky,  near  Frankfort.  He  was  a  black- 
smith and  upon  first  coming  to  Missouri  he  settled  in  Moilroe  County. 
During  the  fifties  he  came  to  Randolph  County  and  loqated  at  old  Mil- 
ton and  later  removed  to  Moberly,  about  1895,  and  died  here  a  few  years 
later,  and  his  remains  are  buried  in  Oakland  Cemetery.  His  widow  still 
survives  him  and  resides  at  314  Union  avenue,  Moberly. 

James  S.  Holloway  was  a  son  of  John  A.  Holloway,  a  native  of  Vir- 
ginia, whose  parents  removed  to  Kentucky  when  he  was  a  child  and  he 
was  reared  to  manhood  in  that  state.  He  came  to  Missouri  in  the  early 
days  and  located  at  old  Milton,  which  was  considered  to  be  a  lively  place 
in  pioneer  days.  It  was  a  stage  station  on  the  stage  route  from  Hannibal 
to  Glasgow.  Here  John  A.  Holloway  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business. 
John  A.  Holloway  and  his  son,  James  S.,  were  active  in  the  organization 
and  establishment  of  the  Antioch  Christian  church  at  Milton.  John  A. 
Holloway  died  about  1885  in  Audrain  County,  while  there  visiting  his 
daughter.  Edward  M.  Holloway,  a  son  of  John  A.,  operated  a  carding 
mill  and  also  a  tobacco  factory  at  Milton  in  the  pioneer  days,  before  the 
advent  of  the  railroads  at  Moberly. 

To  James  S.  and  Zerelda  Holloway  were  bom  the  following  children: 
F.  D.,  a  painter,  Moberly;  J.  E.,  a  blacksmith,  Moberly;  Coleman  P.,  a 
carpenter,  Moberly;  Mrs.  Maggie  Jackson,  of  Moberly;  John  H.,  the  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch;  Marcus,  died  in  1910,  at  the  age  of  26  years;  Mrs. 
Lora  D.  Coldwell,  died  at  Monroe  City,  Mo.;  Mrs.  Emma  Fint,  deceased; 
Mrs.  Anna  T.  Leach,  deceased,  and  Maud  Beatty,  died  at  Keota,  Mo. 


364  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

John  H.  Holloway  received  his  education  in  Monroe  County  and 
came  to  Moberly  in  1883.  Here  he  was 'engaged  in  the  dairy  business 
for  a  number  of  years,  but  for  the  past  25  years  he  has  been  'engaged 
in  the  grocery  business.  He  began  business  at  the  corner  of  Burkholder 
and  Concannan  streets,  but  for  the  past  three  years  his  business  has 
been  located  at  615  South  Fourth  street.  In  addition  to  a  complete  line 
of  groceries,  Mr.  Holloway  also  conducts  a  meat  market  in  connection 
with  his  grocery  store.  He  learned  meat  cutting  under  William  Chis- 
holm,  who  then  conducted  a  shop  on  Clark  street.  Later  Mr.  Holloway 
went  to  Kansas  City  and  was  in  one  of  the  best  markets  there  for  a 
time.    He  is.  one  of  the  best  meat  cutters  in  Moberly. 

Mr.  Holloway  was  married  April  10,  1886,  to  Mrs.  Lillie  D.  Shelton, 
of  Moberly,  a  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Libby  (Starkey)  Dale,  both  of 
whom  are  now  deceased.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holloway  have  been  born 
one  son,  Perry,  age  14  years. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holloway  are  members  of  the  Court  of  Honor. 

Robert  Kingsbury,  manager  of  the  Cross  Lumber  Company,  is  a  na- 
tive of  Howard  County  and  belongs  to  one  of  the  very  early  pioneer 
families  of  Missouri,  members  of  which  settled  in  this  state  about  100 
years  ago.  Robert  Kingsbury  was  born  in  Howard  County,  March  18, 
1887,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Beatrice  (Smith)  Kingsbury,  now  residents 
of  Estill,  Howard  County.  John  Kingsbury  is  also  a  native  of  Howard 
County,  bom  at  Estill  in  1854.  He  is  a  son  of  Leonard  Kingsbury,  who 
was  also  bom  in  Howard  County,  on  a  farm  which  his  father,  Jere  Kings- 
bury, had  entered  from  the  government.  Jere  Kingsbury  settled  in  How- 
ard County  about  1820  and  located  near  Estill,  where  he  entered  govern- 
ment land,  and  some  of  the  members  of  the  Kingsbury  family  have 
maintained  their  residence  in  that  vicinity  to  the  present  time.  Jere 
Kingsbury  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  Howard  County  after  locat- 
ing there,  and  died  at  about  80  years  of  age  and  his  son,  Leonard  Kings- 
bury, spent  his  entire  life  near  Estill  and  also  lived  to  be  about  80  years 
old.  Both  Jere  and  Leonard  Kingsbury  are  buried  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Ceme- 
tery, Howard  County. 

Beatrice  (Smith)  Kingsbury,  mother  of  Robert  Kingsbury,  is  a 
daughter  of  Robert  Smith,  a  native  of  North  Carolina,  who  came  to  Mis- 
souri about  1840.  He  settled  near  Mt.  Airy,  Randolph  County,  and  be- 
came an  extensive  land  owner.  He  owned  a  large  tobacco  farm  and  shipped 
tobacco  and  also  conducted  a  store  at  Mt.  Airy. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  365 

To  John  and  Beatrice  (Smith)  Kingsbury  have  been  born  two  chil- 
dren, Robert,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  and  Palmer,  a  daughter  who  re- 
sides at  home  with  her  parents.  Robert  Kingsbury  attended  the  public 
schools  and  was  graduated  from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  1904.  He 
then  entered  the  University  of  Missouri,  and  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1908.  After  spending  about  a  year  on  the  home  farm  in  Howard 
County,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Cross  Lumber  Company,  Sept.  1, 
1909,  and  in  1918  became  manager  of  this  well  known  and  successful 
industrial  enterprise  of  Moberly. 

Mr.  Kingsbury  was  married  to  Miss  Mattie  Buchanan,  of  Trenton, 
Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  A.  H.  and  Nancy  (Hale)  Buchanan,  who  now 
reside  at  Moberly.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kingsbury  have  been  born  one 
daughter,  Dorothy  B.  Mr.  Kingsbury  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge 
and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Methodist  church  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  local  and  civic  affairs. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  education. 

Virgil  Turner,  owner  of  the  Banner  Motor  Company,  of  Moberly, 
located  at  104-106  North  Williams  street,  and  one  of  the  progressive 
business  men  of  the  city,  was  born  in  Boone  County,  Mo.,  May  24,  1878, 
the  son  of  Samuel  D.  and  Frances  P.  (Tucker)  Turner,  the  former  a  na- 
tive of  Boone  County,  who  died  there  in  1898,  aged  61  years.  His  widow 
now  resides  on  the  old  home  place  near  Hallsville,  Mo.,  where  she  was 
married  in  1879.  She  is  now  76  years,  yet  retains  her  physical  and 
mental  vigor.  Mrs.  Turner  was  one  of  a  family  of  16  children,  all  of 
whom  grew  to  maturity.  Their  father,  W.  W.  Tucker,  was  a  native  of 
Kentucky,  who  became  a  pioneer  settler  of  Boone  County,  where  he 
became  well  known  as  "Squire  Tucker."  His  wife  was  a  member  of  a 
well-known  family.  They  both  died  in  Boone  County  and  were  laid  to 
rest  at  Red  Top  Cemetery.  Mr.  Tucker  was  one  of  the  charter  mem- 
bers of  the  Masonic  Lodge  at  Hallsville.  There  were  12  children  in  the 
Turner  family:  Lizzie,  the  widow  of  A.  B.  O'Rear,  of  Browns,  Mo.; 
Ettie,  the  widow  of  W.  P.  Anderson,  also  of  Browns,  Mo. ;  B.  F.,  of  Halls- 
ville, Mo.;  George  C,  also  of  Hallsville;  Maggie,  deceased;  Nannie,  at 
home  with  her  mother ;  A.  J.,  of  Hallsville ;  R.  S.,  of  Columbia,  Mo. ;  Vir- 
gil, of  this  sketch ;  William  W.,  deceased ;  Arch  B.,  of  Oakland,  Cal.,  and 
Gilbert,  on  the  home  farm. 

Virgil  Turner  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Boone  County, 
as  he  lived  on  the  home  farm,  and  after  his  schooling  was  over  remained 


/■ 


366  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

there  until  he  was  of  age.  He  then  accepted  a  position  as  salesman  in 
a  clothing  store  in  Columbia.  Subsequently  he  was  connected  with  the 
C.  Hall  Company  of  Columbia  for  four  years,  and  then  went  to  Centralia, 
Mo.  Within  a  short  time,  Mr.  Turner  went  into  business  there  and  in 
1908  came  to  Moberly,  established  himself  in  business  on  West  Reed 
street,  where  he  was  a  well-known  merchant  for  12  years. 

On  March  1,  1920,  Mr.  Turner  organized  the  Banner  Motor  Company, 
and  opened  his  show  rooms  at  his  present  address.  He  is  now  the  agent 
for  the  National,  Stephens,  Grant  and  Dixie  Flyer  automobiles  and  Old 
Hickory  and  Grant  trucks.  He  has  a  good  display  room,  clean  and  con- 
venient and  his  business  has  started  off  well,  for  he  is  well  known  and 
liked  in  Moberly,  where  he  has  lived  for  more  than  a  decade. 

Mr.  Turner  was  married  on  May  24,  1903,  to  Miss  Mary  Keene,  of 
Columbia,  Mo.,  the  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Georgia  Ann  Keene.  The 
father  is  deceased  and  Mrs.  Keene  married  for  a  second  husband  Edward 
Kimball,  of  Sedalia,  Mo.,  and  both  of  them  are  now  chiropractors  there. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Turner  have  two  sons:  Hall  and  Samuel  D.  The  family 
resides  at  623  Fisk  avenue,  and  Mr.  Turner  is  a  member  of  the  Benevo- 
lent and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

Charles  H.  Richardson,  a  substantial  citizen  of  Randolph  County,  who 
owns  and  manages  a  farm  in  Union  township,  three  miles  northeast  of 
Moberly  on  the  Paris  road,  was  born  in  Chariton  County,  Mo.,  two  miles 
south  of  Prairie  Hill,  Oct.  26,  1861.  He  is  a  son  of  H.  H.  and  Elizabeth 
(Cloyd)  Richardson,  the  former  a  native  of  Virginia,  bom  in  1824,  and 
came  west  in  the  winter  of  1830-31.  He  drove  across  country  in  true 
pioneer  style  with  a  prairie  schooner  drawn  by  a  team  of  oxen,  reaching 
Randolph  County  when  the  snow  was  from  five  to  six  feet  deep. 

H.  H.  Richardson  was  a  veteran  of  the  Mexican  war  and  crossed  the 
plains  in  1849  to  California  as  captain  of  a  company  of  gold  seekers.  After 
remaining  in  California  for  a  time  he  returned  to  Virginia  by  making 
the  trip  around  Cape  Horn  in  a  sailing  vessel.  During  the  trip  they  were 
caught  in  a  storm  near  Cape  Horn  and  were  shipwrecked.  They  were 
compelled  to  finish  the  trip  by  crossing  some  of  the  southern  continent 
and  then  by  boat  to  the  United  States.  On  this  trip  he  lost  his  money 
and  gold  dust.  Mr.  Richardson  died  in  Maryville,  Mo.,  while  on  a  visit 
to  his  son,  George,  but  was  buried  in  the  old  Richardson  cemetery  in 
Chariton  County,  located  on  the  farm  that  Ancil  Richardson  entered  from 
the  government. 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  367 

The  four  children  born  to  H.  H.  Richardson  and  wife  are :  Charles  H., 
of  this  sketch;  George,  of  Warrensburg,  Mo.;  Margaret  Anne,  the  wife 
of  F.  M.  Stamper,  of  Moberly;  Kate,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  Dr.  B.  J. 
Milam,  and  Thomas,  a  merchant  of  Salisbury,  Mo.  By  a  former  marriage, 
H.  H.  Richardson  had  two  children:  W.  A.,  deceased,  and  Ledora  E., 
the  wife  of  J.  D.  Bozarth,  of  Keytesville,  Mo.  By  a  former  marriage, 
Elizabeth  Richardson  had  two  sons:  M.  M.  Minor,  of  Arkansas,  and  L. 
H.,  deceased. 

Charles  H.  Richardson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  this 
county  and  after  his  elementary  studies  were  finished  he  attended  Central 
College,  of  Fayette,  Mo.  After  leaving  College,  Mr.  Richardson  engaged  in 
farming  in  Chariton  County  until  he  moved  to  Randolph  County  in  1880. 
For  the  first  few  years  he  rented  his  present  farm  and  in  1890,  purchased 
the  place.  It  consists  of  244  acres  of  land  well  watered  by  a  good  well 
and  Elk  Fork  creek,  which  crosses  the  farm,  furnishing  fresh  water  for 
stock.  There  is  one  tenant  house  on  the  place;  the  main  residence  is  a 
two-story  house  of  seven  rooms,  modem  and  convenient.  Mr.  Richard- 
son has  good  barns,  tool  shed,  and  other  buildings  for  farm  use.  In  1910, 
he  built  a  silo  of  100  tons  capacity.  He  has  followed  general  farming  and 
dairying,  having  75  head  of  milk  cows  and  heifers  with  a  registered  male 
at  the  head  of  the  herd.    His  cows  are  all  good  grade  of  Jerseys. 

On  Oct.  18,  1888,  M.  Richardson  was  married  to  Miss  Blanche  Wray, 
of  Union  township,  the  daughter  of  Joseph  A.  Wray,  both  now  deceased. 
Mr.  Wray  was  a  pioneer'  settler  of  Union  township,  and  owned  a  large 
tract  of  land.  Five  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Richardson: 
Wray,  of  Moberly,  married  Susie  Ratliff  in  1912 ;  Rose,  now  a  student  at 
the  University  of  Chicago,  who  for  three  years  was  one  of  the  prominent 
teachers  of  the  state,  having  been  principal  of  the  Centralia  High  School ; 
Howard  H.,  on  the  home  farm,  married  Mary  Paget  in  1914 ;  C.  Horace, 
of  Kansas  City  married  Nellie  Furnish,  and  John  W.,  a  student  in  the  Mo- 
berly High  School. 

Mr.  Richardson  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  Lodge  at  Milton,  Mo. 
For  more  than  30  years  he  has  been  engaged  in  farming  and  today  is  one 
of  the  substantial  men  of  the  community  and  stands  high  in  the  esteem 
of  the  people  of  Randolph  County.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist 
church.  He  is  a  Democrat  and  has  served  on  the  school  board  from  the 
time  he  came  to  the  county  until  1920. 


368  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

The  C.  J.  Harris  Lumber  Company,  which  has  one  of  the  leading 
lumber  yards  at  Moberly,  is  one  of  the  extensive  industrial  institutions 
of  the  state  and  has  13  lumber  yards  in  operation,  two  of  which  are  in 
Randolph  County,  one  at  Moberly  and  one  at  Higbee.  This  company 
was  established  in  1888  and  was  incorporated  in  1905.  The  present 
officers  are:  C.  J.  Harris,  president;  George  Frie^meyer,  vice-president; 
W.  E.  Crutchfield,  treasurer;  E.  N.  Wood,  secretary;  D.  R.  Fitzroy,  pur- 
chasing agent,  and  William  F.  Wigginton,  sales  manager. 

The  C.  J.  Harris  Lumber  Company  has  had  a  remarkable  growth 
and  development.  It  began  business  in  a  humble  way  with  about  a  $3,000 
stock,  and  during  the  33  years  of  its  existence  has  developed  into  a 
corporation  with  a  stock  amounting  to  more  than  $500,000.  The  marvel- 
ous growth  of  this  company  is  not  due  to  accident  nor  chance.  They 
carry  a  complete  line  of  lumber  and  all  kinds  of  building  material,  and 
by  their  methods  have  won  the  conference  of  the  buying  public.  The 
motto  of  this  concern  is  "A  satisfied  customer  is  of  more  value  than  many 
shekels  of  silver." 

The  Moberly  branch  of  the  Harris  Lumber  Company  was  estab- 
lished in  1906,  and  is  one  of  the  leading  lumber  yards  in  Randolph  County. 
They  take  special  pride,  even  in  this  age  of  delinquency,  in  filling  their 
orders  promptly  and  their  delivery  department  is  properly  known  as  the 
"Rapid  Fire  Delivery,"  and  in  this  department  in  the  city  of  Moberly 
they  use  four  auto  trucks  and  one  wagon.  The  local  yard  is  located  on  the 
corner  of  Rollins  and  Sturgeon  streets  and  occupies  a  space  of  170x175 
feet.  It  is  one  of  the  well  kept  and  neatly  arranged  lumber  yards  of  the 
country. 

E.  N.  Wood,  secretary  of  the  C.  J.  Harris  Lumber  Company,  who  is 
the  manager  of  the  Moberly  branch,  is  a  native  of  Missouri.  He  was  bom 
in  Neosho,  Newton  County,  and  has  had  a  wide  experience  in  the  lumber 
business.  He  has  been  manager  of  the  Moberly  branch  of  the  Harris 
Lumber  Company  for  the  past  ten  years. 

Mr.  Wood  was  married  in  May,  1900,  to  Miss  Maggie  B.  Meredith,  of 
Cooper  County,  Mo.  She  is  a  daughter  of  B.  H.  Meredith.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Wood  have  been  bom  two  children,  Martha  Sue  and  John. 

Mr.  Wood,  during  his  business  career  in  Moberly,  has  become  well 
known  and  is  one  of  the  substantial  business  men  of  this  section. 


td 


o 


3 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  369 

Sutliif  and  Jennings,  well-known  breeders  of  pure  bred  registered 
Spotted  Poland  China  hogs,  and  also  wholesale  dealers  in  coal,  handling 
practically  the  entire  output  of  the  mines  around  Huntsville  and  owners 
of  five  farms  in  Randolph  County.  Two  of  the  farms  are  near  Hunts- 
ville, a  third,  four  miles  north  of  Moberly,  the  fourth,  three  miles 
east  of  Higbee  on  the  Chicago  and  Alton  Railroad,  and  the  fifth 
two  and  a  half  miles  south  of  Clifton  Hill,  Mo.  This  firm  began 
breeding  hogs  three  years  ago  and  on  Feb.  23,  1920,  held  a  sale 
at  Huntsville,  where  they  sold  over  $23,000  worth  of  hogs,  averag- 
ing $430.00  a  head,  to  buyers  from  central  Mississippi  states,  which  in- 
dicates the  success  of  the  business.  "Royal  Spot,"  No.  12577,  is  at  the 
head  of  this  herd  and  was  raised  by  Sutliff  &  Jennings.  Three  of  the 
hogs  sold  at  this  sale  took  first,  second  and  third  prizes  at  the  Ohio 
State  Fair  and  first,  third  and  fourth  at  the  National  Swine  Show.  The 
hogs  were  "Miss  Thrift,"  No.  27834;  "Miss  Red  Cross,"_  No.  27838,  and 
"Miss  Liberty,"  No.  27836. 

W.  N.  Jennings  was  bom  at  Moberly  in  1892,  the  son  of  W.  B.  and 
Ella  C.  (Coffee)  Jennings,  the  former  a  native  of  Livingston  County, 
Mo.,  who  for  35  years  was  division  freight  agent  of  the  Wabash  Rail- 
road. He  and  his  wife  died  in  1910,  and  both  were  buried  at  Bloomfield, 
la.  W.  N.  Jennings  was  reared  in  Moberly,  received  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  here  and  then  attended  the  state  university  for  two  years; 
he  then  formed  the  present  partnership  with  Mr.  Sutliff. 

Van  G.  Sutliff  was  born  in  Huntsville,  Mo.,  and  after  completing  his 
education  engaged  in  the  grain  business  there  and  also  owned  and  oper- 
ated a  farm,  in  which  lin§  he  met  with  success.  His  parents  were  pio- 
neer settlers  of  Missouri  and  are  now  living.  Mr.  Sutliff  had  been  a 
breeder  of  stock  before  he  formed  the  partnership  with  Mr.  Jennings, 
and  he  now  has  charge  of  the  hog  department  and  is  recognized  as  one 
of  the  most  successful  breeders  in  the  business. 

In  December,  1917,  Mr.  Jennings  enlisted  in  the  army  at  Jefferson 
Barracks,  Mo.,  and  was  sent  to  Camp  Custer,  Mich.,  for  two  months 
training  in  the  infantry.  From  there  he  was  transferred  to  Barron 
Field,  Tex.,  serving  two  months  in  the  aviation  corps  before  being  sent 
to  Fort  Oglethorp,  Ga.,  to  the  psychological  department,  and  then  was 
made  examiner  at  Camp  Bowie,  Tex.,  remaining  there  until  discharged 
from  the  service  in  December,  1918.  Upon  his  return  to  Missouri,  Mr. 
Jennings  resumed  his  business  here.     He  takes  part  in  the  civic  life  of 


370  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

the  city  and  belongs  to  the  following  organizations:  American  Legion, 
Masonic  Lodge,  being  a  32d  degree  Scottish  Rite  Mason  and  a  Shriner, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

The  Central  Coal  and  Supply  Company,  owned  by  Sutliff  and  Jen- 
nings, with  offices  in  the  Jennings  Building,  was  organized  in  1915,  with 
Van  G.  Sutliff,  president,  and  W.  N.  Jennings,  vice-president.  They  han- 
dle nearly  all  the  output  of  the  coal  mined  in  the  vicinity  of  Huntsville, 
doing  a  wholesale  business  only.  This  department  is  under  the  manage- 
ment of  Mr.  Jennings.  In  connection  with  their  hog  business  the  con- 
cern publishes  the  Spotted  Poland  China  Journal,  which  has  a  circulation 
in  37  states  and  is  also  sent  to  England  and  South  America,  as  it  is  the 
only  publication  in  the  world  devoted  exclusively  to  the  Spotted  Poland 
China  hogs.    It  is  issued  monthly. 

Jerry  C.  Hutsell,  a  prominent  farmer  and  stockman  of  Randolph 
County,  who  resides  four  miles  northeast  of  Moberly  in  Union  township, 
on  the  Paris  state  road,  was  born  on  the  farm  where  he  now  lives,  May 
16,  1864.  He  is  a  son  of  Bloomfield  and  Emily  (Carver)  Hutsell,  who 
were  early  settlers  of  Randolph  County,  locating  here  in  1838.  The  father 
died  in  1884  and  the  mother  in  1907  and  both  are  buried  at  Antioch. 

Mr.  Hutsell's  father  died  when  he  was  a  small  lad  and  he  was  reared 
on  the  home  place  by  his  mother.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  his 
district  and  after  his  education  was  finished  began  to  work  on  the  farm, 
where  he  has  lived  all  his  life.  Mr.  Hutsell  became  one  of  the  well- 
known  agriculturists  of  this  section  and  in  time  became  a  breeder  of  fine 
grade  stock.  The  farm  is  watered  by  several  ponds  and  there  are  two 
good  springs  on  the  south  side  which  are  an  ever  available  supply,  which 
with  the  good  blue  grass  pasture  make  the  Hutsell  place  excellent  for 
raising  cattle.  Mr.  Hutsell  specializes  in  Poland  China  hogs  and  Short- 
horn and  Jersey  cattle  and  raises  horses  also.  Mr.  Hutsell  has  placed 
many  and  permanent  improvements  on  the  farm  with  the  passing  years; 
his  present  house  was  built  in  1897,  and  he  has  two  convenient,  large  stock 
bams  and  other  buildings  for  farm  use  and  stock. 

On  Nov.  7,  1888,  Mr.  Hutsell  was  married  to  Miss  Susie  F.  Hall,  of 
Union  township,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  R.  R.  and  Annie  (Coates)  Hall,  the 
former  a  pioneer  of  this  township,  as  he  located  here  in  the  late  30s.  Mrs. 
R.  R.  Hall  was  the  daughter  of  Captain  Coates  of  Union  township,  who 
came  here  in  the  early  days  and  entered  a  large  tract  of  land,  becoming 
one  of  the  prominent  men  of  this  section  of  the  state. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  371 

One  son  has  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hutsell,  Wilbur  Hall  Hutsell, 
now  located  in  Birmingham,  Ala.  He  enlisted  in  the  army  during  the 
World  War  and  was  first  sent  to  Camp  Beauregard,  La.,  for  13  months' 
training.  He  was  then  transferred  to  Deming,  N.  M.,  for  five  months 
and  sent  from  there  to  Camp  Devens,  Mass.,  where  he  received  his  com- 
mission as  captain.  While  in  the  army  Mr.  Hutsell  was  a  physical  in- 
structor for  the  soldiers  and  is  now  holding  a  similar  position  in  private 
life  at  Birmingham,  Ala.  He  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm,  received  his 
elementary  education  in  the  district  school  and  then  graduated  from  the 
Moberly  High  School.  Following  this,  he  entered  Missouri  University,  at 
Columbia,  where  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 
On  Nov.  12,  1919,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Corinne  Southard,  of  Ft.  Smith, 
Ark. 

The  Hutsell  farm  is  admirably  located  and  is  one  of  the  well  kept 
and  prosperous  farms  of  Randolph  County,  and  receives  mail  by  rural 
delivery,  being  on  route  No.  3. 

F.  H.  Meyers,  manager  of  the  F.  M.  Holtsinger  Duroc  Jersey  hog  farm, 
located  six  miles  northeast  of  Moberly  on  the  Paris  road,  is  regarded  as 
an  authority  on  hog  breeding,  having  specialized  in  this  line  of  live  stock 
for  more  than  15  years. 

Mr.  Meyers  was  born  at  Quincy,  111.,  March  4,  1875,  the  son  of  H.  H. 
and  Mary  K.  (Feeler)  Meyers,  both  now  deceased.  Mr.  Meyers  was  reared 
in  Illinois,  and  received  his  education  there.  After  leaving  school  he  en- 
gaged in  farming  for  a  number  of  years  and  then  came  to  Randolph  County 
in  1900.  For  a  time  he  farmed  here  and  also  held  a  position  in  a  livery 
barn  until  he  accepted  a  position  on  the  Holtsinger  hog  farm,  where  he 
has  been  employed  for  the  past  15  years.  At  first  Mr.  Meyers  was  a  helper, 
but  was  advanced  and  today  is  superintendent  of  the  place  and  has  four 
helpers  under  him  besides  a  night  watchman.  This  farm  is  one  of  the 
best  equipped  stock  farms  in  Missouri,  where  a  specialty  is  made  of  breed- 
ing Duroc  Jersey  hogs.  There  are  300  head  on  the  place  at  the  present 
time;  80  brood  sows,  all  registered;  60  yearling  gilts,  which  will  be  bred 
for  the  summer  sale,  which  takes  place  July  19,  1920.  The  last  sale  from 
the  Holtsinger  herd,  held  Feb.  17,  1920,  brought  $67,000. 

The  farrowing  house  is  132x22  feet,  is  heated  with  steam  as  is  the 
sale  pavilion,  which  is  50  feet  in  diameter  and  seats  800  people.  At 
the  present  time  this  pavilion  is  being  utilized  as  a  farrowing  house  also. 
There  is  a  stock  barn  100x70  feet  and  a  number  of  other  smaller  farm 


372  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

buildings  devoted  to  various  uses.  All  are  fitted  up  for  the  comfort  of 
the  hogs,  for  which  the  farm  is  famous.  The  F.  H.  Holtsinger  Duroc  Jersey- 
hogs  are  known  throughout  the  United  States  as  the  best  of  the  breed. 
When  Mr.  Holtsinger  advertises  a  sale  it  is  attended  by  stockmen  from 
all  over  the  country. 

Mr.  Meyers  is  a  successful  breeder,  gaining  his  present  position 
through  actual  experience.  For  he  has  devoted  his  entire  time  and  at- 
tention to  the  breeding  and  care  of  hogs,  being,  as  he  expresses  it,  "on 
the  job  night  and  day."  There  is  no  particular  season  at  this  farm  as 
the  work  keeps  up  .the  year  round  and  the  same  number  of  men  are 
kept  steadily. 

This  year  Mr.  Meyers  will  attend  the  state  fair  at  Sedalia  with  a 
number  of  show  hogs.  Greater  Orion  Sensation  heads  the  herd  and  holds 
the  record  for  the  highest  price  sale  for  an  untried  sire  in  the  world. 
He  was  a  year  old  on  Oct.  15,  1919,  and  now  weighs  over  850  pounds. 
In  addition  to  being  exhibited  at  Sedalia,  Mr.  Meyers  intends  to  show 
him  at  the  National  Swine  Show  at  Des  Moines,  la. 

C.  A.  McAdam,  one  of  the  oldest  residents  of  Randolph  County,  whw 
lives  on  a  farm  four  miles  northeast  of  Moberly,  is  descended  from  one 
of  the  pioneer  families  that  settled  in.  Missouri  at  an  early  day  and  be- 
came well  and  favorably  known  in  this  section.  He  was  born  in  Chari- 
ton County,  Mo.,  Jan.  15,  1843,  the  son  of  John  P.  McAdam,  a  Baptist 
preacher  who  spent  his  life  in  Missouri  and  died  in  his  75th  year.  The 
mother  died  in  1879.  John  McAdam  was  one  of  the  early  preachers  of 
central  Missouri.  There  were  the  following  children  in  the  family:  John 
P.,  of  Salisbury,  Mo. ;  Lucius,  of  Colorado ;  Dr.  J.  B.,  of  Prairie  Hill ;  C.  A., 
of  this  sketch;  Eliza,  deceased;  Louisa,  the  wife  of  a  Mr.  Harbour,  is 
deceased;  Sallie,  who  became  Mrs.  O'Neal,  deceased,  and  Diana,  who 
married  a  Mr.  Cobb,  is  also  dead. 

C.  A.  McAdam  was  reared  in  Chariton  County  and  received  the  edu- 
cational advantages  afforded  at  that  period.  His  brother,  John  P.,  was 
in  the  Civil  War;  he  joined  the  Confederate  army  though  but  a  boy  and 
served  until  peace  was  established.  Returning  to  Missouri  he  engaged 
in  farming.  In  1869,  C.  A.  McAdam  came  to  Randolph  County  and  lo- 
cated on  the  farm  where  he  still  lives.  He  bought  his  land  from  William 
Wallace,  a  pioneer  settler  of  this  section. 

On  Jan.  28,  1869,  Mr.  McAdam  married  Miss  Lucy  Coates^  the 
youngest  daughter  of  Capt.  Thomas  Coates,  one  of  the  earliest  and  most 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  373 

prominent  settlers  of  the  county,  who  entered  640  acres  of  government 
land.  His  home  is  now  owned  by  Pnce  Dixon.  The  captain  entered  into 
the  life  of  the  community  and.  became  a  man  of  prominence  and  wealth 
before  his  death  at  the  age  of  75  years,  in  1869.  He  was  buried  on  the 
home  place.  His  wife,  Susan  P.  (Lanier)  Coates,  lived  to  be  84  years 
old  and  was  buried  on  the  well-known  Turner  farm,  as  she  first  married 
Synnie  Turner.  Her  brother,  J.  Thomas  now  lives  in  Moberly.  The  other 
children  in  the  Cpates  family  were:  Tunstall,  who  died  in  Oklahoma; 
Norboum  B.,  deceased,  also  of  Moberly;  David,  deceased,  of  Moberly; 
Julia,  who  married  a  Mr.  Roberts  of  Moberly,  is  deceased;  Sallie,  who 
married  H.  Roberts,  died  near  Milton,  Mo.;  Anna,  married  Dr.  Hall, 
deceased,  and  Belinda,  who  married  Dr.  Davis,  of  Moberly,  is  dead.  Her 
son,  Jefferson  Davis,  now  runs  a  furniture  store  in  Moberly. 

There  were  the  following  children  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McAdam: 
Erastus,  who  married  Mattie  Dawkins,  lives  at  Lamar,  Colo.;  Thomas, 
deceased;  Susie,  the  wife  of  William  Cox,  of  Cairo  township;  Sallie,  the 
wife  of  W.  C.  Dawkins,  of.  Moberly ;  Henry  R.,  married  Annie  White,  and 
lives  at  LaJunta,  Colo.;  James,  a  machinist,  of  Moberly,  married  Dazzie 
Delaney,  who  is  dead;  Pearl,  the  wife  of  Earl  Vantrese,  of  Moberly,  and 
Ethel,  the  wife  of  Willard  Rice,  a  machinist  of  Moberly. 

On  Jan.  28,  1919,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McAdam  celebrated  their  golden 
wedding  anniversary,  having  all  their  children  and  grandchildren  with 
them.  This  happy  event  occurred  on  the  farm  where  they  had  lived  for 
50  years. 

Mr.  McAdam  recalls  that  when  he  came  here,  in  1869,  Old  Milton  was 
a  thriving  town  and  Uncle  James  Dameron  and  William  Briscoe  were 
two  of  the  merchants.  Among  some  of  his  friends  of  that  period,  most 
of  whom  have  passed  away,  were  Irvin  Gay,  Captain  Coates,  Joe  Vince, 
Joseph  Wrey,  William  Wallace  and  Levi  Haynes,  all  well  known  and 
prominent  men  in  their  day.  Mr.  McAdam  says  that  most  of  the  land 
north  of  his  farm,  in  1869,  was  open  prairie ;  there  were  few  settlers  and 
they  were  far  apart  and  he  paid  $18  an  acre  for  his  farm. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  McAdam  have  15  grandchildren  and  one  of  them,  Roy 
Cox,  has  carried  out  the  fighting  traditions  of  his  grandfather.  H§ 
enlisted  in  the  United  States  Marines  when  war  was  declared  against 
Germany,  and  soon  after  was  followed  by  his  brother.  Therefore  the 
family  was  well  represented  in  the  fighting  forces  of  the  country. 


374  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McAdam  have  retained  practically  all  of  their 
physical  and  mental  vigor.  The  former  still  looks  after  the  farm  though 
he  rents  a  large  part  of  the  land,  while  his  wife  does  all  her  own  house- 
work. Mr.  McAdam  has  as  a  historical  treasurer,  a  history  of  the  Towles 
family,  of  which  his  mother  was  a  member,  showing  that  the  earliest 
members  in  this  country  settled  in  the  eastern  states  before  the  Revolu- 
tionary War  and  were  prominent  in  colonial  affairs. 

John  Henry  Roberts,  a  substantial  farmer  and  stockman  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  who  lives  about  four  miles  north  of  Moberly  in  Cairo 
township,  is  a  native  of  this  county,  bom  on  the  farm  which  his  brother 
now  owns,  Sept.  17,  1868,  the  son  of  John  S.  and  Sallie  (Terrill)  Roberts. 
The  former  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his  father,  William  Roberts, 
when  only  six  years  old.  The  family  settled  on  a  farm  a  part  of  which 
is  now  the  town  site  of  Moberly.  William  Roberts  died  there  and  was 
buried  in  the  family  burying  ground  on  the  home  place.  John  S.  Rob- 
erts bought  the  farm  which  James  G.  Roberts  now  owns  when  it  was 
unbroken  land.    He  placed  many  improvements  on  it  and  erected  a  home. 

John  H.  Roberts  was  reared  on  his  parent's  farm,  early  learned  the 
practical  side  of  the  business  while  attending  school  at  the  Haynes  school 
bouse.  After  he  finished  his  education  he  began  to  farm,  a  vocation  he 
lias  followed  to  the  present  day.  For  some  years  he  has  also  raised 
stock  and  has  been  successful.  His  present  place  consists  of  265  acres, 
110  of  which  originally  belonged  to  his  father,  but  the  residence  is  on 
that  part  which  belonged  to  John  Hoog.  After  purchasing  the  farm,  Mr. 
Roberts  rebuilt  the  house  and  erected  barns  necessary  for  farm  use  and 
stock.  Since  first  locating  here  Mr.  Roberts  has  kept  sheep  and  now 
has  a  flock  of  80.  Each  year  he  feeds  from  80  to  100  head  of  hogs  and 
keeps  a  fine  flock  of  Barred  Plymouth  Rock  chickens.  The  land  is  well 
watered  by  springs  and  ponds  furnishing  a  never  failing  supply  for  the 
stock. 

On  Dec.  28,  1893,  Mr.  Roberts  was  married  to  Miss  May  Griffin 
of  Cairo,  and  they  have  one  son,  Raymond  Griffin,  bom  in  1896,  who 
graduated  from  the  Moberly  High  School  and  then  entered  Missouri  Uni- 
versity at  Columbia,  receiving  his  degree  in  1918,  and  is  now  at  home 
with  his  parents. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roberts  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church  at  Cairo 
and  received  their  mail  from  Rural  Route  No.  1. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  375 

Mrs.  Roberts  belongs  to  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  Missouri, 
as  her  father,  James  G.  Griffin  was  born,  reared  and  educated  in  Macon 
County,  but  now  resides  at  Independence.  He  married  Belle  McKinney, 
March  21,  1872,  and  for  25  years  they  lived  in  Cairo,  where  Mr.  Griffin 
was  a  well-known  merchant.  Mrs.  Griffin  died  in  1916.  Mrs.  Roberts 
was  the  oldest  of  their  eight  children. 

James  T.  Boney,  a  well-to-do  farmer  of  Cairo  township,  living  five 
miles  north  of  Moberly,  with  mail  delivered  by  rural  route  No.  1,  from 
Cairo,  was  born  in  this  township,  Nov.  11,  1869,  the  son  of  William  J. 
and  Emily  (Campbell)  Boney. 

James  T.  Boney,  grandfather  of  James  T.  and  A.  T.  Boney  took  up 
government  land  three  miles  northwest  of  Cairo  and  lived  there  until  his 
death  in  his  83d  year.  The  family  made  the  trip  across  half  the  continent 
in  wagons  and  was  accompanied  by  David  McCann,  William  Boney's 
brotheY-in-law,  who  located  a  mile  northwest  of  Jacksonville,  where  he 
spent  the  remainder  of  his  life.  William  and  Emily  Campbell  Boney  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children,  born  in  Cairo  township:  Walter  G., 
of  Eugene,  Ore.;  Arthur  T.,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume; 
Robert  M.,  of  Merced,  Calif.,  and  James  T.  of  this  review  who  was  reared 
on  the  old  homestead,  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  at  Bolivar  Col- 
lege, Polk  County,  Mo.  After  leaving  college  he  returned  to  his  native 
county  to  engage  in  farming  which  he  has  followed  to  the  present  time. 
He  and  his  father  began  the  breeding  of  registered  Hereford  cattle  in 
1883  and  met  with  success  and  became  known  as  prosperous  stockmen 
of  this  section.     In  1915,  this  herd  was  sold. 

James  T.  Boney's  present  farm  consists- of  262  acres  in  Cairo  town- 
ship, known  for  many  years  as  the  Kirkendall  Farm;  he  also  has  a  % 
interest  in  405  acres  of  another  tract;  all  the  land  is  rich  and  has  good 
pastures  and  is  well  watered.  The  residence  on  the  home  farm  was  built 
in  1879,  but  has  been  improved  and  modernized  by  Mr.  Boney.  He  has 
built  a  silo  and  several  good  bams  while  other  buildings  are  used  for 
granaries,  cattle  sheds  and  hogs. 

On  Aug.  23,  1899,  Mr.  Boney  married  Miss  Margaret  Tait,  a  daughter 
of  R.  J.  and  Jean  (Gemmill)  Tait,  both  deceased.  They  came  to  Moberly 
in  1885  and  the  father  died  in  1909  and  his  wife  died  in  1914.  One  child 
has  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Boney,  William  C,  bom  in  1900,  who  was 
reared  on  his  father's  farm,  received  his  education  in  the  local  schools, 
graduated  from  the  Moberly  high  school  and  now  is  attending  the  agri- 
cultural college  of  the  State  University  at  Columbia,  Mo. 

Mr.  Boney  is  a  member  of  the  Randolph  County  Farm  Bureau. 


376  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Rev.  p.  J.  Carney. — Father  Carney,  who  has  charge  of  the  parish  of 
St.  John's  Catholic  church  of  Moberly,  was  born  at  Castlebar,  Ireland, 
June  17,  1874,  the  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Henehan)  Carney,  being  the 
third  in  order  of  birth,  of  their  eight  children.  John  Carney  was  a  farmer 
and  stock  raiser  in  Ireland,  and  it  was  in  the  country  that  Father  Carney 
spent  his  youthful  years,  attending  the  local  college.  When  he  became 
destined  for  the  priesthood,  he  entered  St.  Patrick's  Seminary  at  Carlow, 
where  he  continued  his  classic  studies,  and  at  the  same  time  read  for  the 
ministry.  When  only  23  years  of  age,  he  passed  his  final  examinations 
and  was  ordained  in  Ireland  in  1897.  The  parents  continued  to  reside  in 
their  native  land.  The  mother  died  in  1910  at  the  age  of  62  and  the 
father  died  in  1919  at  the  age  of  84. 

Soon  after  entering  the  priesthood.  Father  Carney  came  to  the  United 
States,  being  assigned  to  duty  in  St.  Louis  until  May,  1909,  when  he  came 
to  Moberly  to  assume  charge  of  the  parish  here.  Within  a  short  time. 
Father  Carney  had  laid  plans  for  a  new  church  edifice  which  was  built 
under  his  direction  and  is  a  structure  of  which  the  Catholics  may  well 
be  proud.  The  new  modern  residence  has  also  been  erected,  and  the  church 
is  free  from  debt. 

In  politics.  Father  Carney  is  an  independent,  as  he  believes  in  voting 
as  his  conscience  dictates,  but  believes  that  in  local  affairs  the  man  best 
fitted  to  serve  the  people  should  be  elected  to  office.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks. 

James  G.  Roberts,  a  prosperous  farmer  and  stock  raiser  of  Cairo 
township,  living  on  the  old  home  place,  four  and  a  half  miles  north  of 
Moberly,  was  bom  where  he  now  resides  April  13,  1872,  the  son  of  John 
S.  and  Sallie  (Terrill)  Roberts,  whose  history  appears  in  the  sketch  of 
John  Henry  Roberts.  He  was  reared  in  this  township,  spent  his  youth  on 
the  farm  and  was  educated  in  the  public  school  of  the  district  and  when 
old  enough  began  to  farm,' and  has  followed  that  business  all  his  life. 
When  he  became  owner  of  the  old  home  place,  Mr.  Roberts  began  to  make 
a  number  of  improvements,  as  some  of  the  buildings  were  old.  He  im- 
proved the  house  built  by  his  father  many  years  ago,  so  that  it  is  one 
of  the  comfortable  homes  of  this  section.  Several  substantial'  barns 
have  also  been  built  for  farm  use  and  the  stock.  He  raised  Shropshire 
sheep  and  Shorthorn  and  Angus  cattle.  The  farm  consists  of  215  acres, 
well  watered,  and  the  part  which  he  cultivates  raises  good  crops. 


REV.    P.    J.    CARNEY 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  377 

The  Roberts  family  was  a  large  and  well-known  one  here  and  is 
as  follows:  Luzerne,  William,  Milton  Arthur,  John,  whose  sketch  ap- 
pears in  this  volume;  James  G.,  of  this  sketch;  Anna,  the  wife  of 
John  Walden,  of  Moberly;  Sallie,  deceased;  Virginia  Lee,  wife  of  Bessie 
Walden,  of  Moberly;  Minnie,  the  widow  of  Cliflf  Roberts,  of  Moberly,  and 
Josephine,  the  wife  of  William  Moore,  of  Moberly. 

A.  T.  Boney,  one  of  the  oldest  residents  and  for  years  a  prominent 
merchant  of  Cairo,  where  he  owns  a  hardware  and  implement  house, 
has  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the  civic  affairs  of  the  town,  having  served 
as  mayor  and  councilman  for  more  than  20  years.  His  store  building 
is  135x36  feet,  divided  into  two  sections,  where  he  carries  a  full  line 
of  hardware,  stoves,  farm  implements,  furnaces  and  also  has  a  tin  shop 
for  doing  general  repairing,  equipped  with  machinery  for  lathe  work, 
disc  grinding  and  all  kinds  of  sharpening.  In  the  rear  he  runs  a  black- 
smith shop.  This  business  was  started  originally  as  far  back  as  1875 
by  John  W.  Baker,  who  was  succeeded  by  James  T.  Boney,  who  ran  it 
a  year  before  disposing  of  his  stock  and  good  will  to  A.  T.  and  W.  G. 
Boney,  and  later  W.  J.  Boney  succeeded  W.  G.  Boney,  and  remained  a 
member  of  the  firm  until  his  death  in  1914,  when  A.  T.  Boney  became 
sole  owner. 

A.  T.  Boney  was  bom  in  CaiBO  township  July  30,  1864,  the  son  of 
W.  J.  and  Emily  (Campbell)  Boney,  both  deceased.  The  father  came  to 
Randolph  County  in  1837  from  Duplin  County,  N.  C,  where  he  was 
born.  His  father,  James  T.  Boney,  took  up  government  land  in  Cairo 
township  and  lived  on  the  farm  until  in  1890.  His  wife  died  in  1889. 
Mr.  Boney  was  reared  on  the  pioneer  farm,  and  received  his  education 
in  the  district  schools.  He  then  engaged  in  farming  until  he  became  a 
partner  in  the  hardware  business,  which  he  has  followed  for  30  years. 

In  1891,  Mr.  Boney  was  married  to  Miss  Missouri  Bobbitt,  of  Cairo 
township,  a  native  of  Virginia,  the  daughter  of  J.  E.  and  Sarah  Bobbitt. 
Mrs.  Boney  died  in  1895,  leaving  two  children:  Herbert  L.,  now  asso- 
ciated with  his  father  in  business.  He  enlisted  in  the  United  States 
army  Sept.  20,  1917,  was  assigned  to  Company  L,  356th  Infantry,  and  was 
sent  to  Camp  Funston  for  training.  June  16,  1918,  he  sailed  for  France 
and  was  soon  sent  to  the  St.  Mihiel  sector  and  took  part  in  the  Battle  of 
the  Argonne.  From  the  time  he  was  sent  into  the  front  line  trenches 
until  the  armistice  was  signed,  Mr.  Boney  was  not  out  of  range  of  the 
enemy  guns.     After  hostilities  ceased  he  became  a  member  of  the  Army 


378  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

of  Occupation  in  Germany.  After  21  months  foreign  service,  Mr.  Boney 
was  discharged  from  the  army  as  he  had  returned  to  this  country  in 
June,  1919.  He  was  a  corporal  during  his  entire  time  of  service.  Herbert 
Boney  was  reared  in  Cairo,  received  his  elementary  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Cairo  and  Moberly;  then  entered  college  at  Liberty,  Mo.  After 
a  period  of  study  there  h?  went  east  and  entered  Harvard  University,  re- 
maining a  year.  Emily,  the  second  child,  also  was  reared  in  Cairo  and 
after  graduating  from  the  Moberly  High  School  entered  Hardin  College, 
at  Mexico,  Mo.,  where  she  was  graduated  in  music. 

In  1898,  A.  T.  Boney  married  Miss  Margaret  Bobbitt,  a  sister  of  his 
first  wife  and  she  died  in  September,  1919. 

In  recalling  pioneer  time  of  Randolph  County,  Mr.  Boney  says  that 
there  are  but  five  people  now  living  in  the  town  of  Cairo  who  were  in- 
habitants 30  years  ago  when  he  came.  He  has  seen  many  changes  in  his 
day.  After  the  city  was  incorporated,  Mr.  Boney  began  to  take  part  in 
its  administration  and  for  20  years  has  served  either  as  councilman  or 
mayor. 

Bank  of  Cairo,  one  of  the  sound  and  substantial  institutions  of  cen- 
tral Missouri,  was  organized  in  April,  1905.  Tticker  G.  Haden  was  the 
leading  promoter  of  this  bank  and  became  its  first  cashier,  a  position 
which  he  still  holds.  The  first  officers  of  the  bank  were:  J.  W.  Stigall, 
president;  John  Halliburton,  vice-president  and  T.  G.  Haden,  cashier, 
while  the  board  of  directors  were  the  above  men  and  D.  G.  Day,William 
Gaines  and  W.  P.  Nichols,  now  deceased.  The  present  officials  are  0.  A. 
Wright,  president;  G.  D.  Day,  vice-president;  T.  G.  Haden,  cashier;  Miss 
Gertrude  Walker,  assistant  cashier,  with  E.  E.  Campbell  and  William 
Gaines  directors  in  addition  to  the  active  officials.  Miss  Walker  has 
been  with  the  bank  for  11  years;  she  was  born  and  reared  here,  the 
daughter  of  Paul  Walker  of  this  city.  The  present  capital  stock  of  the 
bank  is  $10,000;  surplus,  $20,000,  with  undivided  profits,  $2,500,  which 
shows  what  a  growth  the  institution  has  made  since  its  organization. 
The  chief  corresponding  bank  is  the  First  National,  of  St.  Louis. 

Tucker  G.  Haden  was  bom  in  Shelby  County,  March  14,  1869,  the 
son  of  Thomas  H.  and  Frances  (Wright)  Haden.  both  natives  of  Madison 
County,  Ky.  The  father  came  to  Missouri  and  took  up  land  which  he 
farmed  all  his  life,  becoming  a  well  known  and  prosperous  farmer  and 
stockman  of  his  section.  Mrs.  Frances  (Wright)  Haden  died  at  the  age 
of  61  years,  and  her  husband  lived  to  be  nearly  85.    There  were  the  fol- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  379 

lowing  children  in  the  Haden  family:  R.  W.,  of  Stockton,  Mo.,  ex-judge 
and  now  assistant  postmaster  of  the  town;  Travis,  a  retired  farmer  of 
Shelbina,  Mo. ;  Irwin,  a  farmer  near  Madison,  Mo. ;  A.  C,  a  retired  farmer 
of  Clarence,  Mo. ;  J.  D.,  a  farmer  near  Holliday ;  Bettie,  the  wife  of  Frank 
Carroll,  of  Clarence,  Mo.;  Fannie,  the  wife  of  Oscar  Bean,  of  Madison, 
Mo.;  Tucker  G.,  of  this  review,  and  Monnie,  the  wife  of  T.  S.  Hobbs,  of 
Rocky  Ford,  Colo. 

Tucker  G.  Haden  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  Shelby  County, 
educated  in  the  public  schools  and  then  entered  the  State  Normal  School 
at  Warrensburg.  He  also  took  a  special  course  in  the  Gem  City  Business 
College  of  Quincy,  111.  He  then  taught  school  in  Monroe  County  for  13 
years  before  coming  to  Cairo  to  organize  the  bank,  the  success  of  which 
has  been  largely  due  to  his  foresight,  executive  ability  and  close  applica- 
tion to  business. 

Nov.  6,  1913,  Mr.  Haden  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Cave  of  Hunts- 
ville,  the  daughter  of  W.  B.  and  Ella  (Carlisle)  Cave,  both  now  deceased. 
In  1913,  Mr.  Haden  built  a  modern  bungalow  on  East  Main  street,  where 
the  family  has  resided  since  coming  to  Cairo.  Mrs.  Haden  is  a  member 
of  the  Methodist  church  and  Mr.  Haden  belongs  to  the  Christian  church. 
He  stands  high  in  Randloph  County  and  is  one  of  its  successful  bankers 
and  enterprising  citizens. 

William  W.  Goodding,  a  representative  citizen  of  Randolph  County 
for  nearly  three  quarters  of  a  century,  now  having  retired  at  Cairo,  is  one 
of  the  oldest  residents  in  this  section  and  a  member  of  a  pioneer  family 
that  located  in  this  state  when  Missouri  was  considered  the  frontier.  He 
was  born  in  Cairo  township,  July  12,  1846,  the  son  of  Andrew  and  Mar- 
garet (Rogers)  Goodding,  both  natives  of  Wayne  County,  Ky.,  where  they 
were  reared,  educated  and  married.  The  father  was  born  in  1801  and 
died  in  1876 ;  the  mother  was  born  in  1804  and  died  in  1881.  Both  were 
buried  in  the  family  burying  ground  on  the  Dameron  farm.  They  came 
to  Missouri  and  settled  in  Randolph  County  in  1829,  making  the  trip  to 
this  state  driving  a  wagon  to  which  were  hitched  a  yoke  of  oxen  with  a 
horse  for  leader.  The  first  winter  they  were  here  was  spent  in  a  log  cabin 
20x20  feet  with  a  dirt  floor  and  they  lived  there  through  the  severest 
winter  storms  for  that  year  was  one  of  exceptional  severity.  Old  settlers 
said  that  was  the  worst  winter  on  record. 

Andrew  Goodding  entered  360  acres  of  land  which  he  owned  to  the 
time  of  his  death.     He  had  six  brothers :  Joseph,  Isaac,  Nixon,  Alexander 


380  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

and  Samuel,  all  of  whom  came  to  Missouri  and  settled  in  Macon  and  Ran- 
dolph counties.  Andrew  and  Margaret  Goodding  had  the  following  chil- 
dren: Richard,  deceased;  Mrs.  Bettie  Phipps;  George,  James,  Polly, 
Jemima,  Fannie,  all  deceased. 

William  Goodding,  the  subject  of  this  review  was  reared  on  his  par- 
ent's farm,  attended  the  Pleasant  Hill  school  of  this  township  and  re- 
mained at  home  helping  his  father  on  the  farm  until  1890,  when  he  bought 
160  acres  of  land  from  Mike  Capp  and  engaged  in  general  farming  until 
1913.  Mr.  Goodding  was  one  of  the  well  known  and  prosperous  farmers 
of  this  section.  When  it  came  time  for  him  to  give  up  the  active  man- 
agement of  his  land  he  sold  the  property  and  bought  an  acre  of  land 
within  the  limits  of  Cairo  where  he  now  makes  his  home,  one  of  the  old 
and  honored  residents. 

Dec.  21.  1883,  William  Goodding  was  married  .to  Miss  Elizabeth 
Elliott,  a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Nancy  (Montgomery)  Elliott,  the 
former  born  in  Randolph  County  in  1821,  near  Jacksonville  and  at  the 
fair  some  15  years  ago,  he  took  the  prize  as  being  the  oldest  resident 
citizen  of  the  county.  He  died  at  the  advanced  age  of  88  years.  Mrs. 
Elliott  died  in  her  63d  year  and  both  are  buried  in  thie  Teter  family  ceme- 
tery in  Chariton  township.  Mr.  Elliott's  father,  William  Elliott,  was  one 
of  the  first  settlers  in  this  county  and  was  the  father  of  nine  children  of 
whom  Mrs.  Goodding  is  the  third. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goodding  have  one  daughter,  Ava,  who  married  Frank 
Haynes  of  Moberly.  She  was  born  June  6,  1886,  and  married  in  1906. 
Mrs.  Haynes  has  a  daughter,  Nadine  Elizabeth,  in  school. 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goodding  are  members  of  the  Baptist  Church  of 
which  they  have  been  members  many  years,  for  Mr.  Goodding  will  be  74 
years  old  July  12,  1920  and  belongs  to  a  long  lived  family  as  his  cousin 
Margaret  Baker,  of  Cairo,  bom  in  this  county,  is  nearly  80  and  they  can 
tell  many  interesting  experiences  of  pioneer  days  here. 

Eldridge  S.  Morrison,  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Randolph  County, 
has  been  a  resident  here  for  more  than  a  half  a  century.  He  was  born 
in  Montgomery  County,  Tenn.,  Jan.  17,  1842,  the  son  of  James  P.  and 
Sarah  (Davis)  Morrison,  both  of  whom  passed  their  lives  in  Montgomery 
County.  They  had  the  following  children:  Annie,  deceased;  Robert,  was 
killed  at  the  Battle  of  Gettysburg,  while  serving  in  the  Confederate  army, 
having  enlisted  at  Clarksville,  Tenn. ;  A.  P.,  lived  at  Fresno,  Calif.,  and  is 
deceased ;  C.  B.,  lives  at  Arbuckle,  Calif. ;  Emma  Jordan,  resides  at  Spring- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  381 

field,  Mo. ;  Letetia  Davis,  died  in  Montgomery  County,  Tenn. ;  John  Henry 
lives  at  Memphis,  Tenn.,  and  Eldridge  S. 

Eldridge  S.  Morrison  was  reared  in  Tennessee,  received  his  education 
there  and  when  the  Civil  War  broke  out  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army 
at  Clarksville,  being  a  member  of  Captain  Dorsey's  company  of  infantry. 
After  the  capture  of  Fort  Donelson  he  was  transferred  to  a  troop  of 
Kentucky  cavalry,  commanded  by  Captain  Williams  and  participated  in 
the  battle  of  Fort  Donelson,  Shiloh,  Miss.,  Mumsford,  Ky. ;  and  many  im- 
portant skirmishes.  After  12  months  in  the  service,  Mr.  Morrison's 
health  was  so  impaired  that  he  was  discharged  for  disability. 

In  1867  Mr.  Morrison  came  to  Missouri,  reaching  Randolph  County  at 
10  o'dock  on  the  morning  of  Dec.  11th.  He  first  located  north  of  Cairo, 
where  he  farmed  for  a  few  years ;  then  in  1877  he  removed  to  his  present 
farm,  two  miles  south  of  Cairo.  When  he  came  to  this  section  of  the 
township  it  was  raw  open  prairie.  Some  settlers  had  located  around 
here  and  a  few  farms  were  being  cultivated,  but  it  was  a  true  pioneer 
settlement.  There  was  a  small  house  on  the  land  Mr.  Morrison  purchased 
which  has  since  been  rebuilt  and  remodeled.  He  owns  340  acres  of  valu- 
able land  with  some  in  blue  grass  pasture.  Three  substantial  large  barns 
have  been  erected  and  other  farm  buildings.  For  several  years  Mr.  Mor- 
rison operated  a  dairy  but  gave  up  that  branch  of  his  business  20  years 
ago  to  raise  Aberdeen  Angus  cattle  in  which  he  specialized.  He  kept  a 
registered  male  at  the  head  of  his  herd,  fed  the  cattle  he  raised  and 
shipped  to  market  what  were  not  disposed  of  at  private  sales.  For  years 
he  was  known  as  one  of  the  successful  breeders. 

The  Morrison  farm  is  well  improved  in  every  way;  there  are  six 
living  wells  on  the  place  and  water  is  pumped  by  three  wind  mills.  For 
some  years  Mr.  Morrison's  son,  William  R.,  has  been  raising  registered 
Hampshire  hogs  and  since  his  father  retired  from  the  active  management 
of  the  place  has  been-  its  manager.  Though  78  years  old  and  having 
lived  on  this  farm  for  43  years,  Mr.  Morrison  retains  much  of  his  physical 
vigor  though  he  has  given  up  the  harder  work^ 

On  May  2,  1869,  Mr.  Morrison  was  married  to  Miss  Susan  Caroline 
Boney,  the  daughter  of  J.  T.  and  Elizabeth  (Carr)  Boney,  who  were  born 
and  reared  in  North  Carolina  and  came  west,  settling  two  miles  north  of 
Cairo  in  1835.  Their  history  will  be  found  on  another  page  of  this 
volume.  Mrs.  Morrison  was  born  at  the  old  homestead  north  of  Cairo, 
was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  district  and  taught  school  for 


382  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

five  years  before  her  marriage,  having  taught  in  eight  schools  of  the 
county.  There  were  10  children  in  the  Boney  family  all  of  whom  were 
well  and  favorably  known  in  the  county. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morrison  have  had  four  children:  William  R.,  farming 
the  home  place ;  Emma,  the  wife  of  W.  A.  Bobbitt,  of  Cairo ;  Maud,  who 
married  Henry  Corbin,  of  Corder,  Mo. ;  Minnie,  the  wife  of  W.  C.  Buchanan, 
of  Moberly,  the  last  two  being  twins.  Four  grandchildren  complete  the 
family  circle:  Robert  and  Mary  Corbin  and  Morrison  and  Dorothy 
Buchanan.  ^ 

Mrs.  Morrison  tells  that  her  parents  came  west  so  early  that  there' 
were  few  railroads,  so  they  made  the  trip  in  a  wagon  drawn  by  a  team 
of  oxen  and  their  worldly  goods  consisted  of  what  could  be  packed  onto 
the  wagon  and  $300  in  money.  They  were  Cumberland  Presbyterians; 
the  father  and  his  family  attended  the  annual  camp  meetings  held  at 
Sugar  Creek  church.  The  parents  were  devoted  members  of  the  church 
and  did  much  to  elevate  the  religious  standards  of  the  county.  All  their 
children  but  one  joined  the  church  when  young. 

William  R.  Morrison,  the  son  who  now  operates  the  home  farm,  was 
reared  here,  attended  the  district  schools  and  when  his  education  was 
completed  began  to  farm  with  his  father.  In  addition  to  breeding  Aber- 
deen cattle,  he  has  been  specializing  in  raising  Hampshire  hogs,  meet- 
ing with  success  in  this  line.  He  annually  keeps  about  30  head,  feeding 
and  marketing  them.  William  R.  Morrison  is  one  of  the  farmers  of  the 
younger  generation  who  has  introduced  modem  methods  into  his  busi- 
ness with  success  and  today  is  rated  as  one  of  the  practical  men  of  the 
community.  Six  years  of  his  life  was  spent  on  different  railroads  as  a 
brakeman  and  conductor,  from  1899  until  1905.  He  is  a  member  of 
Brotherhood  of  Railroad  Trainmen. 

R.  G.  Terrill,  a  well  known  citizen  of  Moberly  and  a  native  of  Randolph 
County,  was  bor  ntwo  miles  south  of  Moberly,  Oct.  12,  1866.  He  is  a 
son  of  John  R.  and  Ann  (Roberts)  Terrill,  both  of  whom  are  now  de- 
ceased. John  R.  Terrill  was  born  in  Kentucky  and  came  to  Missouri  when 
he  was  a  young  man  and  settled  on  a  farm  south  of  Moberly  where  he  was 
successfully  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising.  He  died  in  1913,  at 
the  age  of  84  years,  his  wife  having  preceded  him  in  death  many  years. 
She  died  in  1872.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  W. 
E.,  deceased;  Lolah,  deceased;  Emma,  deceased;  Lizzie,  resides  in  Mob- 
erly; J.  M.,  who  is  farming  on  the  old  home  place;  R.  G.,  the  subject  of 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  383 

this  sketch;  H.  R.,  Moberly;  V.  C,  Moberly;  and  Anna,  married  Loyd 
Wayland,  Moberly. 

R.  G.  Terrill  was  reared  in  Randolph  County  and  received  his  edu- 
cation in  the  public  schools.  He  has  made  farming  his  chief  occupation 
and  has  met  with  success.  He  is  now  the  owner  of  110  acres  of  valuable 
land,  south  of  the  city  of  Moberly  where  he  is  carrying  on  general  farm- 
ing and  stock  raising,  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  substantial  and  suc- 
cessful citizens  of  this  vicinity. 

Mr.  Terrill  was  married  April  22,  1897,  to  Miss  Lena  Horner,  a 
daughter  of  James  S.  and  Louisa  (Kingsbury)  Homer,  further  mention 
of  whom  is  made  in  this  volume.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Terrill  have  been  born 
two  children:  Louisa  Ruby,  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Missouri, 
class  of  1920;  and  John  Vincent,  a  graduate  of  the  Moberly  High  School 
and  now  a  student  at  Central  College,  Fayette,  Mo. 

Mr.  Terrill  takes  a  commendable  interest  in  matters  pertaining  to 
the  public  welfare.  In  1911  he  was  elected  clerk  of  Randolph  County  and 
capably  held  that  office  for  four  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons  of  Huntsville  and  has  an  extensive  acquaint- 
ance throughout  Randolph  County. 

Edward  Ellsworth  Leonard,  a  prominent  contractor  and  builder  of 
Moberly,  has  been  a  resident  of  this  city  for  the  past  35  years.  He  was 
born  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  July  6,  1863  and  is  a  son  of  Lewis  B.  and  Susan 
(Snipes)  Leonard.  Lewis  B.  Leonard  was  born  at  Hagerstown,  Md.,  in 
1819  and  died  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  in  1916  and  is  buried  in  that  city. 
He  was  a  Union  veteran  of  the  Civil  War.  He  enlisted  at  Columbus,  Ind., 
in  the  7th  Indiana  Battery  and  served  one  year  and  ten  months.  He 
was  wounded  at  the  Battle  of  Shiloh,  Miss.  His  vdfe  died  in  1912  at  the 
age  of  77  years  and  is  also  buried  in  Indianapolis.  They  were  the  parents 
of  14  children,  four  of  whom  are  living:  P^lorence  Leonard,  Indianapolis; 
Annette,  Indianapolis;  Charles  F.,  Indianapolis  and  Edward  E.,  the  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch,  was  the  youngest  of  the  family.  The  others  who  grew 
to  maturity  and  are  now  deceased  are :  Mrs.  Martha  Overman  and  Henry. 

Edward  E.  Leonard  was  reared  and  educated  in  Indianapolis  and 
learned  his  trade  in  that  city.  In  1885,  he  came  to  Moberly,  Mo.  and  for 
two  years  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company.  He  then 
engaged  in  contracting  and  building  and  since  that  time  has  done  a  vast 
amount  of  work  in  that  line  in  Moberly  and  other  parts  of  the  state.  He 
did  the  woodwork  on  the  county  jail  at  Huntsville  and  built  the  Radium 


384  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Hotel  there  and  the  original  structure  of  the  Huntsville  school.  He  re- 
modeled the  Moberly  Bank  at  Moberly  and  erected  many  high  class  build- 
ings, too  numerous  to  mention,  in  this  vicinity.  At  this  writing  he  em- 
ploys 23  men  including  five  brick-layers,  three  hod-carriers,  two  plasterers, 
two  painters  and  two  granitoid  workers.  He  is  the  agent  for  the  Kewanee 
metal  store  fronts  and  also  the  Millmer  Elevator  Company  of  St.  Louis 
and  these  two  branches  of  work  take  in  all  parts  of  the  state. 

Mr.  Leonard  was  married  in  1887  to  Miss  Bessie  M.  Dulany  of  Mob- 
erly. She  is  a  daughter  of  George  W.  and  Virginia  Dulany,  both  of  whom 
wer  born  at  Middle  Grove,  Mo.  The  father  died  at  Moberly  and  the 
mother  now  resides  here  at  the  age  of  77  years.  Mrs.  Leonard  was  born 
in  Moberly  in  1869  and  is  the  oldest  person  now  living  in  Moberly,  bom 
there.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leonard  have  been  bom  two  children:  Dulany 
Ellsworth,  a  graduate  of  the  Moberly  High  School,  married  Miss  Clara 
Laurel  of  St.  Louis  and  is  now  a  freight  claim  inspector  in  the  employ  of 
the  Wabash  Railroad  Company,  attended  the  State  University  at  Colum- 
bia, Mo.,  taking  a  course  in  law;  and  Mary  Virginia,  who  was  graduated 
from  the  Moberly  High  School  in  1918,  attended  Christian  College  two 
years  and  resides  at  home  with  her  parents  at  515  South  Williams  street. 

Mr.  Leonard  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees  and  is  one 
of  the  substantial  citizens  of  Randolph  County. 

William  C.  Clifford,  a  passenger  conductor  on  the  Wabash  railroad  at 
Moberly,  Mo.,  has  for  20  years  served  in  the  capacity  of  conductor  on  this 
railroad  and  during  that  time  has  been  a  resident  of  Moberly.  Mr.  Clif- 
ford was  born  at  Tolono,  111.,  Oct.  26,  1868,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Sarah  (Phillips)  Clifford. 

William  Clifford  was  a  native  of  Kentucky,  bom  at  Louisville,  in 
1850.  He  was  a  grain  dealer  and  also  served  as  justice  of  the  peace  at 
Tolono,  m.,  and  died  at  Clinton,  111.,  in  1892.  His  wife  was  born  in  Vin- 
cennes,  Ind.,  in  1846,  and  died  at  Champaign,  111.,  in  1918.  They  were  the 
parents  of  six  children  as  follows:  Edward,  deceased;  Charles  V.  Mar- 
shalltown,  Iowa ;  Fannie  M.,  Champaign,  111. ;  Nannie  A.,  Little  Rock,  Ark. ; 
William  C,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  and  Gertie,  married  G.  W.  Simp- 
son, Champaign,  111. 

William  C.  Clifford  attended  the  public  schools  and  when  16  years 
of  age  began  as  a  brakeman  on  the  Wabash  railroad  at  Decatur,  111.,  con- 
tinuing in  that  employment  until  1887,  when  he  went  to  St.  Paul,  Minn., 
with  the  intention  of  working  for  the  Chicago  and  Great  Western  railroad 


WIUJA^r  C,   CLIFFORD 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  385 

as  conductor.  Shortly  afterwards  he  went  to  British  Columbia  and  was 
employed  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  railroad  as  conductor  until  1900.  He 
then  came  to  Mobei'ly,  Mo.,  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Wabash  Rail- 
road Company  as  freight  conductor,  serving  in  that  capacity  for  15  years, 
when  he  was  promoted  to  passenger  conductor.  He  now  runs  between 
Moberly  and  Omaha,  on  the  Omaha  Division. 

Mr.  Clifford  was  married  in  1900  to  Miss  Isabel  French,  a  daughter  of 
Wallace  R.  and  Isabel  (Emsley)  French,  both  were  natives  of  Wisconsin 
and  the  father  now  resides  at  Waterloo,  Iowa.  The  mother  was  born  at 
Waukesha,  Wis.,  and  is  now  deceased. 

Mr.  Clifford  is  a  32nd  degree  Mason,  Knights  Templar  and  Shriner,  a 
member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Order  of 
Railway  Conductors  and  is  a  Democrat,  and  both  he  and  Mrs.  Clifford  are 
members  of  the  Methodist  church,  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star  and  the 
Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security.  The  Cliffords  are  well  known  in  Moberly 
and  they  are  highly  regarded  among  their  many  friends  and  acquaintances. 

Perry  D.  Menke,  a  popular  and  widely  known  passenger  conductor 
who  has  been  in  the  service  of  the  Wabash  Railroad  Company  for  36 
years  and  during  that  time  has  been  a  resident  of  Moberly,  Mo.  He 
ifS  a  native  of  Illinois,  bom  at  Granville,  Edgar  County,  Sept.  4,  1857, 
and  is  a  son  of  Peter  L.  and  Margaret  B.  (Mitchell)  Menke.  Peter  L. 
Menke  was  bom  in  Loudoun  County,  Va.,  July  4,  1831.  He  was  a  cabinet 
maker  and  carpenter  and  followed  that  line  of  work  during  the  greater 
part  of  his  life  at  Paris,  111.  In  later  life  he  removed  to  Mattoon,  111., 
where  he  lived  for  five  years  prior  to  his  death,  Aug.  2,  1907.  His  wife 
was  a  native  of  Indiana.  She  was  born  at  Liberty,  Union  County,  Ind., 
Nov.  4,  1832,  and  they  were  married  at  Eaton,  Preble  County,  Ohio, 
Nov.  26,  1850.  She  is  now  87  years  old  and  resides  with  her  daughter, 
Mrs.  C.  L.  Sweet  at  Hutchinson,  Kan. 

To  Peter  L.  and  Margaret  B.  (Mitchell)  Menke  were  bom  the  follow- 
ing children:  Charles  H.,  bom  March  28,  1852,  at  Eaton,  Ohio,  and  died 
Dec.  4,  1902;  Mary  E.,  was  born  July  20,  1854,  and  died  Sept.  4,  1855; 
Perry  D.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Francis  N.  and  Benjamin  F.,  twins, 
bora  Sept.  8,  1859,  and  Benjamin  F.,  died  Sept.  10,  1914;  George  L.  and 
John  H.,  twins,  born  at  Grandview,  111.,  Dec.  27,  1861,  and  John  H.,  died 
May  4,  1865 ;  Thomas  D.,  bom  March  17,  1869,  i)S  an  abstractor  at  An- 
tonito,  Colo.;  James  Edward,  born  Oct.  24,  1860,  was  an  employee  for 
the  Missouri  Pacific  Railroad,  and  was  killed  by  his  own  train  at  Ottawa, 
Kan.,  Nov.  4,  1887;  Ida  N.,  bom  Jan.  1,  1870,  married  Frank  Constant, 


386  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

and  lives  in  Chicago;  Jessie  B.,  born  March   1,   1872,  married  Charles 
L.  Sweet,  and  resides  in  Hutchinson,  Kan. 

Perry  D.  Menke  was  reared  in  Paris,  111.,  and  attended  the  publiic 
schools.  When  he  was  18  years  of  age,  he  began  his  railroading  career 
at  Paris,  111.,  as  night  baggageman  and  also  yard  and  billing  clerk.  Later 
he  entered  the  train  service  of  the  Indianapolis  division  of  the  I.  and  St. 
L.  railroad,  which  is  now  the  St.  Louis  division  of  the  New  York  Cen- 
tral railroad  system,  with  Mattoon,  111.,  as  his  headquarters.  In  1883,  he 
went  to  Sedalia,  Mo.,  where  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Missouri  Pacific 
Railroad  Company  as  conductor  for  one  year.  He  then  came  to  Moberly 
and  worked  for  the  Wabash  as  brakeman  for  a  few  months,  when  he  was 
promoted  to  freight  conductor  and  in  1887  became  a  passenger  conductor 
and  since  1890  has  had  a  regular  passenger  run.  Thus  it  will  be  seen 
that  Mr.  Menke  has  had  many  years  experience  as.  a  practical  railroad 
man  and  has  a  good  record  to  hiis  credit. 

July  30,  1907,  Perry  D.  Menke  was  married  to  Miss  Mildred  Cevor, 
of  Kansas  City,  Mo.  She  was  born  in  Florida.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Menke 
have  no  children. 

Mr.  Menke  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  a  member  of  the  Shrine, 
Ararat  Temple,  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  the  Order  of  Railway  Conductors, 
No.  49,  Moberly,  Mo.  He  is  a  Republican  and  a  member  of  the  Presby- 
terian church.  Mrs.  Menke  is  a  member  of  the  Episcopal  church.  They 
are  well  known  in  Moberly  and  Randolph  County  and  are  highly  regarded 
represented  citizens  of  the  community. 

James  S.  Horner,  father  of  Mrs.  R.  G.  Terrill  of  Moberly,  was  a 
pioneer  merchant  of  Huntsville  and  prominently  identified  with  the  early 
development  of  Randolph  County  and  belonged  to  one  of  the  very  earliest 
pioneer  families  of  Missouri.  He  was  bom  in  Howard  County,  Oct.  7, 
1832  and  was  a  son  of  Major  and  Keturah  (Morgan)  Horner. 

Major  Horner  was  one  of  the  prominent  early  settlers  of  this  state. 
He  was  born  in  Chesterfield  County,  Va.,  Dec.  19,  1789  and  was  married 
in  that  county,  Nov.  7,  1812.  He  came  to  Missouri  in  1819  and  settled 
in  Howard  County  where  he  bought  land  and  some  negroes  and  in  Febru- 
ary, 1839,  he  came  to  Randolph  County  and  here  owned  over  600  acres  of 
land  northwest  of  the  present  site  of  Moberly.  During  the  Civil  War  on 
account  of  condition  prevailing  here  he  removed  to  St.  Louis  and  after 
the  war  he  made  his  home  at  Columbia  and  died  at  the  home  of  his  son, 
James  S.  Horner,  in  Huntsville.  He  was  a  soldier  in  the  War  of  1812, 
serving  in  Capt.  Wilson  Bryan's  Company,  19th  regiment,  serving  with 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  387 

the  Virginia  troops.  He  served  as  sergeant  in  Capt.  Benjamin  Goode's 
company.  Colonel  Joseph  Brown's  regiment,  Virginia  Militia  from  Aug. 
28th  to  Nov.  30,  1814,  after  having  served  as  private  as  above  stated. 
After  coming  to  Missouri  he  was  conspicuous  in  military  affairs  in  this 
state.  He  was  made  Lieut.-Colonel  of  the  10th  Regiment,  21st  Division 
of  Missouri  Militia  in  1822  by  Governor  McNair,  and  was  appointed 
colonel  in  1824.  In  1837  he  was  apointed  paymaster  general  of  the  State 
Militia  by  Governor  Boggs  and  after  having  paid  the  men  the  first  time 
he  had  a  small  amount  of  money  left  which  he  promptly  returned  to  the 
treasurer  which  up  to  that  time  was  an  unheard  of  procedure.  This  was 
during  the  Morman  War.  He  also  acted  as  paymaster  for  the  Missouri 
troops  during  the  Black  Hawk  War.  He  was  prominent  in  the  political 
affairs  of  Randolph  County  and  the  state.  In  1850  he  was  elected  a 
representative  to  the  state  legislature  and  again  in  1858  and  in  1860  was 
elected  state  senator.  He  was  a  strong  Southern  sympathizer  and  voted 
for  secession  at  the  special  session  of  the  legislature,  called  by  Governor 
Jackson  which  convened  at  Neosho,  Mo.  He  rode  from  Moberly  to  Neosho 
on  horseback  to  attend  that  convention.  He  was  a  Methodist  and  a  life 
long  Democrat.  He  was  a  strong  temperance  man  and  a  prominent  mem- 
ber of  the  Masonic  Lodge. 

James  S.  Horner  was  educated  at  Fayette,  Mo.,  attending  school 
there  after  his  parents  moved  to  Randolph  County.  He  engaged  in  the 
dry  goods  business  at  Huntsville  prior  to  the  Civil  War  and  was  in  part- 
nership with  his  brother-in-law  George  Dameron.  He  was  in  business 
here  when  the  Civil  War  broke  out  and  being  a  Southern  sympathizer,  his 
store  was  looted  by  the -Federal  troops  and  he  shortly  afterwards  dis- 
posed of  his  business  to  a  Northern  man  and  went  to  St.  Louis.  After 
the  war  he  returned  to  Huntsville,  where  he  died  Feb.  22,  1871.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Methodist  church  and  the  Masonic  Lodge.  He  was  mar- 
ried Sept.  4,  1860  to  Louisa  Jane  Kingsbury  and  to  this  union  three  chil- 
dren were  bom:  Laura  Shirley  Homer  who  resides  at  Moberly,  Mo.;  Lena, 
married  R.  G.  Terrill  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  in  this  volume.  After 
the  death  of  James  S.  Homer  his  widow  married  Judge  John  R.  Hull,  who 
was  a  prominent  lawyer  of  Randolph  County.  He  served  as  prosecuting 
attorney  and  probate  judge  of  this  county  and  for  a  time  published  a 
newspaper  in  Huntsville.  He  and  his  wife  are  now  both  deceased.  He 
died  in  1892  and  she  departed  this  life  in  1901. 


388  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH  COUNTY 

Anthony  J.  Rother,  the  well  known  merchant  tailor  of  Moberly  is 
one  of  the  best  designers  and  cutters  to  be  found  anywhere  in  the  country. 
He  comes  from  a  family  of  high  class  tailors  and  has  made  extensive 
study  of  the  science  of  designing  and  the  art  of  cutting  and  tailoring. 
Mr.  Rother  is  a  native  of  Missouri.  He  was  born  at  Washington,  Mo., 
Jan.  16,  1886  and  is  the  son  of  John  and  Ann  (Boehm)  Rother  who  were 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Anthony  J.,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Julia  Rother,  Washington,  Mo.  and  John,  deceased.  The  mother 
died  in  1890,  having  been  accidentally  burned  to  death  on  July  4th  of  that 
year.  Her  clothes  caught  fire  from  fireworks  which  were  carelessly  ex- 
ploded- by  some  boys  as  she  was  passing  along  the  street. 

John  Rother,  father  of  Anthony  J.  Rother,  was  born  in  Prussia- 
Poland  or  what  is  now  known  as  Germany.  He  came  to  America  at  the 
age  of  ten  years,  in  1870,  and  now  lives  at  Washington,  Mo.  He  was 
one  of  the  finest  tailors  in  the  state  of  Missouri  and  has  one  brother  who 
is  a  high  class  tailor  of  St.  Joseph,  Mo.  He  learned  the  trade  from  his 
brother  John.  Two  of  Mrs.  Rother's  brothers  were  also  high  class  tailors : 
Chas.  Boehm,  St.  Louis,  Mo. ;  Frank  Boehm,  in  business  with  John  Rother 
at  Washing-ton,  Mo. 

Anthony  J.  Rother  was  educated  in  the  Notre  Dame  Convent  and 
then  attended  the  Franciscian  Brothers  Dormitory  and  afterwards  at- 
tended the  University  of  Missouri  at  Columbia.  For  eight  years  he  was 
connected  with  G.  W.  Harrell  and  Son,  merchant  tailors  at  Columbia. 
Later  he  was  employed  by  Patt  Brothers,  tailors  of  St.  Joseph,  Mo.  PYom 
there  he  went  to  New  York  and  completed  a  course  in  designing  men  and 
women's  garments.  After  completing  this  course  he  went  to  Dartmouth 
College,  Hanover,  N.  H.  and  had  charge  of  the  tailoring  department  of  a 
large  men's  furnishing  store, which  catered  to  the  students  and  professors 
o,f  the  college.  He  then  went  to  Boston  where  he  was  engaged  in  design- 
ing and  cutting  for  a  time  when  he  returned  to  New  York  City.  In  1915 
he  came  to  Moberly  and  engaged  in  his  present  business  and  owing  to  the 
excellency  of  his  workmanship,  the  style  of  his  designing  and  the  re- 
liability of  his  representation,  he  has  built  up  one  of  the  largest  high  class 
tailoring  establishments  in  this  section  of  the  state.  Mr.  Rother  follows 
the  Mitchell  system  of  which  he  has  made  a  thorough  study.  This  is  a 
short  standard  measure  of  cutting  and  designing  and  is  the  foundation 
of  all  systems  employed  in  this  work.  A  designer  who  understands  the 
Mitchell  system  thoroughly  can  easily  handle  any  other  system  of  cutting. 


HISTORY   OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  389 

Mr.  Rother  graduated  from  the  Mitchell  School  of  Cutting  and  Designing 
of  JSfew  York  on  Sept.  5,  1914. 

Anthony  J.  Rother  was  married  in  1916  to  Miss  Mary  G.  Noonan  of 
Moberly;  she  is  a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Genevieve  Noonan.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Rother  have  two  children:  Jane  Ann  and  Richard  John. 

Mr.  Rother  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  the  Tailors 
and  Cutters  Association  of  America. 

E.  0.  and  G.  N.  Blood,  well  known  and  prosperous  stockmen  and 
farmers  of  Ca'ro  township,  Randolph  County,  are  the  sons  of  N.  L.  and 
Laura  (Blood)  Blood,  the  former  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  bom  Jan.  5, 
1847,  and  the  mother  was  born  in  Pennsylvania.  The  father  was  a 
farmer  and  moved  to  Iowa  where  he  was  a  farmer  and  stockman  for 
many  years.  He  came  to  Randolph  County  in  1909,  and  purchased  the 
Arthur  Roberts  farm  of  160  acres  in  Cairo  township.  He  died  in  Septem- 
ber, 1915,  being  survived  by  his  wife  until  Dec.  9,  1918,  when  she  too 
passed  away.  Both  were  laid  to  rest  in  Grand  Prairie  Cemetery.  The 
following  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Blood ;  E.  0.,  of  this  review ; 
Mrs.  Edna  Austin  of  Cairo  township;  G.  N.,  of  this  sketch,  and  Marcia. 

The  Blood  brothers  were  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Iowa. 
They  were  reared  on  their  father's  farm  and  early  began  to  assume  many 
of  the  duties  on  the  home  place  so  that  by  the  tim.e  their  schooling  was 
over  they  were  both  good  practical  farmers.  They  came  to  Randolph 
County  in  March,  1909  and  bought  a  farm  a  half  mile  north  of  Cairo, 
where  they  were  associated  in  business  with  their  father  until  his  death. 
The  farm  is  one  of  the  well  improved  places  in  this  section  of  the  county ; 
has  two  good  residences  on  it,  good  bams,  machine  shed,  poultry  house, 
calf  barn  and  many  other  buildings  for  farm  uses.  Since  coming  to  Mis- 
souri the  Bloods  have  handled  pure  bred  stock  almost  entirely,  o-wning 
10  pure  bred  Polled  Shorthorn  cows  with  Scottish  Victor  2d,  17484-695098, 
at  the  head  of  the  herd.  He  was  bred  by  F.  A.  Murray  &  Son  of  Mason, 
111.  That  they  have  been  successful  in  the  breeding  and  rearing  of  cat- 
tle is  attested  by  the  fact  that  six  animals  which  they  raised  were  sold 
on  March  23,  1920,  at  Kansas  City,  at  the  American  Polled  Shorthorn 
Breeders  Association  sale  to  other  breeders.  They  also  keep  a  herd  of 
35  well  bred  Shropshire  sheep  with  a  registered  male  at  the  head  of  the 
flock. 

On  Jan.  26,  1912,  E.  0.  Blood  was  married  to  Miss  Ora  McKinney,  of 
Cairo  township,  a  daughter  of  J.  L.  and  Nancy  McKinney,  both  deceased. 


390  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

Nancy  Huntsman  McKinney  was  born  near  Cairo  and  reared  in  Randolph 
County.  Mrs.  Blood  is  a  member  of  one  of  the  old  pioneer  families  of 
the  section. 

G.  N.  Blood  and  his  sister,  Marcia,  live  together  in  one  of  the  two 
farm  houses.  Miss  Blood  is  a  chicken  fancier  and  raises  the  Brown  Leg- 
horn variety,  having  met  with  success  in  this  branch  of  farm  inlustry, 
usually  having  about  150  hens  on  hand. 

Both  Blood  brothers  are  members  of  the  Grange  and  considered 
progressive  and  practical  farmers  and  men  of  industry  and  thrift  which 
qualities  are  bringing  them  to  the  front  of  the  agricultural  producers  of 
Randolph  County,  which  does  not  lack  for  able  farmers. 

J.  P.  Stinnett,  owner  of  Fairview  Stock  Farm,  Cairo  township,  is  one 
of  the  progressive  and  enterprising  farmers  and  stockmen  of  Randolph 
County.  He  is  a  native  of  Kentucky,  bom  near  Lexington,  Fayette 
County,  March  16,  1877.  His  parents  were  James  P.  and  Sarah  L.  (Tay--^ 
lor)  Stinnett,  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased.  They  were  the  parents 
of  two  children:  J.  P.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  and  Scott  Stinnett,  of 
Fulton,  Mo.  The  father  died  and  after  his  death  the  mother  was  married 
to  A.  C.  Duggins.    She  came  to  Missouri  about  1893  and  died  here  in  ISgS. 

J.  P.  Stinnett  was  reared  and  educated  in  Kentucky  and  came  to  Mis- 
souri when  he  was  about  16  years  of  age.  He  bought  7014,  acres,  one 
and  one-half  miles  north  of  Cairo  which  he  sold  in  1919  and  bought  his 
present  place.  This  fann  consists  of  106  acres  and  is  situated  one  mile 
south  of  Cairo  and  known  as  Fairview  Stock  Farm.  Since  purchasing 
the  place  Mr.  Stinnett  has  made  a  number  of  valuable  improvements,  in- 
cluding an  addition  to  the  bam  and  after  he  has  carried  out  some  of  his 
other  plans  of  improvements,  Fairview  Stock  Farm  will  be  one  of  the 
conveniently  arranged  and  attractive  places  of  the  county.  Mr.  Stinnett 
is  a  successful  breeder  of  Shorthorn  cattle  and  Duroc  Jersey  hogs.  He 
has  been  engaged  in  breeding  Duroc  Jerseys  for  the  past  eight  years  and 
his  present  splendid  herd  of  23  hogs  is  headed  by  "Cairo  Colonel,"  a  valu- 
able registered  male  hog.  Mr.  Stinnett  is  meeting  with  success  and  estab- 
lishing a  reputation  as  a  breeder. 

Nov.  24,  1903,  Mr.  Stinnett  was  married  to  Miss  Bell  Boyd  of  Cairo. 
She  is  a  daughter  of  J.  M.  and  Mollie  Boyd,  both  of  whom  are  now  de- 
ceased and  their  remains  are  buried  in  Grand  Prairie  cemetery.  Mrs. 
Stinnett  was  bom  in  Macon  County,  Mo.  and  came  to  Randolph  County 
with  her  parents  when  she  was  ai  girl,  and  here  she  was  reared  and  edu- 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  391 

cated.  To  Mr. .'and  Mrs.  Stinnett  have  been  born  eight  children  as  fol- 
low: Irene,  a  student  in  the  Cairo  High  School;  Sibert,  Ida  May,  Ell- 
wood,  Willa  Maud,  Charles,  Stella  B.  and  Mildred  Ruth. 

Mr.  Stinnett  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America.  The  Stinnett  family  is  well  known  in  Cairo  and  vicinity  and 
are  among  the  leading  citizens  of  that  section. 

J.  F.  McKinney,  one  of  the  successful  farmers  and  stockmen  of  Ran- 
dolph County,  was  born  in  that  part  of  Salt  River  which  is  now  Cairo 
township,  Jan.  11,  1849.  He  is  the  son  of  Daniel  and  Eliza  (Brown)  Mc- 
Kinney,  both  natives  of  Lincoln  County,  Ky.,  further  mention  of  whom 
is  made  in  this  volume.  They  were  pioneer  settlers  of  Missouri  and  are 
now  both  dead  and  were  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Liberty  church.  Of 
their  family  the  following  children  survive:  H.  S.,  J.  F.,  of  this  review, 
and  Mat. 

J.  F.  McKinney  spent  his  boyhood  and  youth  on  his  father's  farm 
and  received  his  educational  advantages  in  the  public  school  of  Highland 
district.  John  Cottingham  was  his  first  teacher  and  the  second  teacher 
under  whom  he  received  instruction  was  Jonathan  Bailey,  followed  by 
Reuben  Weaver,  all  well  known  educators  of  that  early  day.  After  his 
schooling  was  over  the  young  man  began  to  farm,  first  on  the  home  place 
and  then  independAtly.  More  than  40  years  ago,  Mr.  McKinney  bought 
the  farm  where  he  now  resides,  from  his  father,  Daniel  McKinney  who 
entered  the  land  from  the  government.  The  home  place  consists  of  a 
40  acre  tract  which  has  a  good  farm  home,  large  convenient  barn  and 
many  other  good  improvements.  He  has  engaged  in  general  farming  and 
stock  raising  for  many  years  and  been  successful  in  his  business,  due  to 
his  own  hard  work  and  ability. 

On  Jan.  20,  1875,  Mr.  McKinney  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Hunts- 
man, who  died  March  6,  1904.  She  was  the  daughter  of  George  M.  and 
Euphemia  Huntsman.  There  were  three  children  born  to  this  marriage: 
Glenn,  who  married  Nora  Ridgway,  and  Pearl,  who  live  at  home  with 
their  father.  Pearl  married  William  Baker,  who  with  Glenn,  now  man- 
ages the  farm;  and  Euphia  married  William  Baker  and  is  deceased.  Mr. 
McKinney  has  two  grandchildren:  Armel  and  Roy  F.  Baker,  who  when 
war  was  declared  against  Germany  enlisted  in  the  United  States  navy. 
He  was  sent  to  the  Great  Lakes  Training  School,  then  transferred  to  the 
naval  base  at  Norfolk,  Va.,  where  he  was  stationed  until  assigned  to 


392  -HISTORY  OF  EANDOLPH  COUNTY 

service  on  the  battleship  Indiana.  Later  he  was  transferred  to  the  re- 
cruiting ship  at  Bay  Ridge,  N.  Y.,  but  finally  was  sent  to  the  U.  S.  S. 
Southbend,  a  transport,  and  crossed  the  ocean  three  times  during  the  war. 
He  was  mustered  out  of  the  service  on  Sept.  5,  1919. 

Mr.  J.  F.  McKinney  is  one  of  the  substantial  and  progressive  citizens 
of  Randolph  County  who  has  done  his  part  in  stock  and  food  production 
and  aided  in  the  development  of  this  section  for  more  than  three-quarters 
of  a  century.  He  is  now  past  70  years  of  age,  a  hale,  hearty  man  who 
retains  all  of  his  mental  vigor;  a  man  of  intellect  and  education,  who  has 
been  a  close  friend  of  the  editor  of  this  history  many  years. 

Abraham  S.  Mines,  a  successful  stockman  and  farmer  and  sterling 
citizen  of  Randolph  County,  was  bom  in  Culpeper  County,  Va.,  July  19, 
1853,  the  son  of  Peter  S.  and  Fannie  F.  (Stover)  Hines.  Peter  S.  Hines 
was  also  born  in  Culpeper  County,  July  16,  1810,  and  died  July  ,7  1895. 
He  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  east,  where  he  lived  until  1852,  when 
he  came  west.  Mr.  Hines  made  the  trip  from  the  old  home  in  Virginia 
to  Missouri  in  a  covered  wagon,  on  which  were  loaded  the  necessities  for 
the  home  to  be  established  in  the  new  country.  He  had  a  four  horse 
team  which  drew  the  wagon  and  its  burdens  the  long  journey  to  Prairie 
township,  Randolph  County,  where  the  family  established  a  home.  For 
10  years  the  family  lived  near  Higbee,  then  moved  to  l^e  farm  now  owned 
by  Abraham  Hines,  where  the  father  died.  Fannie  Stover  Hines,  also  was 
born  in  Culpeper  County,  Va.,  Feb.  22,  1812,  and  died  in  February,  1889. 

Abraham  S.  Hines  was  reared  on  the  pioneer  farm,  and  was  one 
of  a  family  of  ten  children.  He  attended  the  public  schools.  When  old 
enough  he  began  farming  and  has  followed  this  vocation  practically  all 
his  life,  though  for  10  years  he  also  ran  a  saw  mill  and  farmed  at  the 
same  time  in  Audrain  County,  Mo.  At  one  time  Mr.  Hines  bought  a 
threshing  outfit,  which  he  ran,  but  as  he  expresses  it,  "It  nearly  broke 
me  up,"  and  he  disposed  of  it.  In  1892,  he  bought  the  farm  of  140  acres 
from  the  Hines  heirs,  which  he  now  owns  and  farmed  there  until  1900, 
when  he  sold  it  to  good  advantage,  but  bought  it  back  two  years  later. 
Since  then  he  has  made  permanent  improvements  on  the  place  and  has 
began  breeding  Shorthorn  cattle  in  which  he  has  been  successful,  and  has 
made  exhibits  of  his  stock  at  local  shows.  For  some  time  Mr.  Hines  has 
been  improving  the  strain  of  his  cattle  and  has  a  valuable  herd.  He  and 
his  sons  are  in  business  together.  In  1918  they  sold  a  cow  and  bull  calf 
which  brought  $1,025  each.    He  also  raises  hogs  and  mules.    The  Hines 


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HISTORY  OF 'RANDOLPH   COUNTY  393 

men  are  today  considered  some  of  the  most  substantial  men  of  Randolph 
County. 

Jan.  28,  1886,  Mr.  Hines  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  C.  Rupard,  a 
native  of  Kentucky,  the  daughter  of  Lewellen  E.  and  Millie  (Easter) 
Rupard,  both  natives  of  Kentucky,  who  came  to  Randolph  County,  in  1868, 
and  engaged  in  farming.  Both  are  now  dead.  Six  children  were  bom 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hines:  Claud,  deceased;  Ezra,  of  East  St.  Louis,  111.; 
Mattie  M.,  the  wife  of  Guy  Jackson,  of  Prairie  township;  Virginia,  de- 
ceased; William  Rex,  and  Eugene,  at  home. 

Mr.  Hines  is  a  Democrat  and  belongs  to  the  Christian  church.  His 
wife  is  a  member  of  the  Baptist  church. 

W.  L.  Landrain,  one  of  the  honored  pioneers  of  Missouri,  who  settled 
in  Cairo  towmship,  Randolph  County,  when  most  of  the  land  was  raw 
unbroken  prairie  and  has  witnessed  many  changes  that  have  taken  place 
since  he  came  here.  Mr.  Landram  has  contributed  his  share  to  county 
upbuilding  and  food  production  for  more  than  63  years.  He  was  born  in 
Bourbon  County,  Ky.,  March  18,  1833,  the  son  of  Reuben  and  Nancy 
(Dingle)  Landram,  the  former  a  native  of  Virginia,  who  enlisted  during 
the  War  of  1812  from  Bourbon  County  and  served  until  peace  was  de- 
clared. He  came  to  Missouri  in  1837,  locating  first  in  Marion  County  and 
remained  there  one  year  before  settling  in  Macon  County,  where  his  chil- 
dren were  reared.  Both  the  parents  are  deceased  and'  were  buried  in 
Macon  County.  The  following  children  were  born  to  Reuben  and  Nancy 
(Dingle)  Landram:  Frances,  married  Buck  Skinner  and  died  on  the 
way  to  California  and  the  corpse  was  brought  back  to  Missouri  by  her 
husband  in  a  wagon;  Nancy  D.,  married  John  Speak  and  is  deceased; 
James  E.,  deceased;  W.  L.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Abner  P.,  de- 
ceased; Lucy,  married  Samuel  Shaffner  and  is  deceased;  Carter,  Merced, 
Calif.;  John  and  Alfred,  both  deceased. 

W.  L.  Landram  spent  his  boyhood  days  in  Macon  County  with  his 
parents  and  became  a  practical  farmer.  In  1851,  at  the  age  of  18  he 
came  to  Randolph  County  and  began  to  work  by  the  month  to  earn  money 
enough  to  attend  the  McGee  College  at  College  Mound,  Mo.  When  he 
finished  his  course  he  taught  school  for  12  years.  Mr.  Landram  became 
heir  to  80  acres  of  land  which  then  was  all  unbroken  prairie  in  1857  built 
his  first  home.  From  time  to  tim.e  he  bought  more  land  until  he  has  152 
acres  in  the  home  farm  and  a  tract  of  40  acres  bf  timber  a  mile  west. 
There  is  one  piece  of  25  acres  on  the  homestead  which  has  never  been 


394  HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY 

broken  and  the  original  blue  grass  remains  to  this  day.  For  over  6? 
years  this  farm  and  house  has  been  the  home  of  the  Landram  family  and 
it  is  one  of  the  best  kept  places  in  the  county.  The  two  story  house  is 
well  painted  and  attractive;  there  are  two  good  barns  and  sheds,  also 
other  buildings  for  the  stock,  hogs  and  chickens.  All  the  home  place 
is  good  arable  land  and  is  cultivated.  Two  never  failing  wells  furnish 
excellent  water  for  household  and  farm  use.  In  1857  Mr.  Landram 
planted  some  locust  trees,  which  are  still  living  and  furnish  good  shade; 
one  is  now  over  eight  feet  in  circumference. 

On  Sept.  11,  1856,  Mr.  Landram  was  married  to  Miss  Betsey  Jane 
Boney,  the  daughter  of  J.  T.  and  Elizabeth  (Carr)  Boney.  They  were 
early  settlers  of  Randolph  County,  coming  here  from  North  Carolina  and 
bought  a  farm  in  Cairo  township.  Both  are  deceased  and  are  buried  at 
Grand  Prairie.  This  historic  old  burying  ground  was  laid  out  by  Mr. 
Landram  in  1865.  The  land  and  the  church  ground  were  given  by  Wil- 
liam King  and  the  first  burial  was  of  Leela  Landram,  who  died  Dec.  -31, 
1865,  the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  W.  L.  Landram  of  this  sketch.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Landram  have  lived  on  this  farm  and  in  the  same  house  for 
more  than  63  years.  Sept.  11,  1919,  they  celebrated  their  63d  wedding 
anniversary.  The  following  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Landram:  Orpha  Ann,  deceased;  John  Carr,  died  in  California  in  1901; 
James  Logan,  of  Moberly;  Leela  Kate,  deceased;  Luella  Bell,  the  widow 
of  E.  G.  Kennedy,  lives  with  her  parents;  William  Edward,  of  Merced, 
Calif;  Nellie,  deceased;  Finis  Lee,  of  Merced,  Calif.;  Hugh  Carter,  de- 
ceased, and  Oscar,  deceased. 

During  the  later  years  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Landram  have  enjoyed  six  trips 
to  visit  their  relatives  in  California.  They  have  12  grandchildren  and 
three  great  grandchildren. 

William  K.  Towles,  Sr.,  now  deceased,  was  a  prominent  citizen  and 
well  known  stockman  and  farmer  of  Cairo  township,  Randolph  County, 
and  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  settlers  of  this  county.  He  was  born  in 
Howard  County,  May  29,  1843,  and  came  to  Randolph  County  with  his 
parents  that  same  year.  They  were  Stokley  and  Mary  (Ellis)  Towles, 
both  of  whom  passed  the  rest  of  their  lives  here  and  were  buried  on  the 
home  place.  They  had  five  children:  Wilham  K.,  Sr.,  Port,  Thomas,  Mrs. 
Nannie  Grady  and  Mary,  married  George  Towles  and  all  are  deceased. 
William  Towles,  Sr.,  was  reared  in  Cairo  township,  and  when  his  school 
days  were  over  engaged  in  farming.     At  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War 


HISTORY  OF  RANDOLPH   COUNTY  395 

he  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  army  and  served  four  years,  being  wounded 
three  times,  first  with  a  saber  during  a  skirmish  at  Independence,  Mo.,  and 
he  was  shot  twice  at  the  battle  of  Lexington,  Mo.  After  peace  was  de- 
clared, Mr.  Towles  returned  to  Randolph  County  and  resumed  farming. 
On  Sept.  24,  1871,  he  married  Miss  Martha  Goodding  and  they  had  the 
following  children:  Richard,  of  Batesville,  Ark.;  William  K.,  Jr.,  of  this 
review;  Mollie,  the  wife  of  William  Sims,  of  Moberly;  Jennie,  at  homej 
Jackson,  at  home,  and  Annie,  the  wife  of  A.  W.  Hinton,  of  Moberly. 

WilHam  K.  Towles,  Sr.,  devoted  his  time  and  energies  to  his  farm 
endeavors  and  became  one  of  the  prominent  stockmen  and  feeders  of  this 
section  of  Missouri.  With  his  sons  William,  Jr.,  and  Jackson,  they  owned 
970  acres  of  land.  Wm.  K.,  Sr.,  Towles  died  March  24,  1920,  and  was 
buried  at  Oakland  cemetery.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Baptist  church  for 
more  than  30  years,  being  a  member  at  Pleasant  Hill.  He  was  a  Demo- 
crat. 

William  K.  Towles,  Jr.,  was  reared  on  the  home  farm,  received  his 
education  in  the  district  schools  and  then  with  his  father  and  brother 
Jackson,  began  farming  on  an  extensive  scale.  For  15  years  this  part- 
nership continued  until  the  death  of  the  father  and  since  that  time  the 
two  brothers  have  continued  the  business.  They  are  wide  awake  stock- 
men and  feeders  as  well  as  progressive  farmers  and  keep  about  150  head 
of  cattle  each  year,  30  head  of  horses  and  mules  and  now  have  150  head 
of  Shropshire  sheep,  and  about  300  head  of  cattle.  The  place  is  well 
improved.  One  bam,  80x120  feet  has  a  concrete  foundation  and  is  con- 
sidered one  of  the  best  barns  in  the  county.  It  has  a  loft  with  a  capacity 
of  100  tons  of  hay  and  a  basement  100  feet  long  for  stock.  A  second  barri 
was  built  with  a  silo  and  the  third,  60x80  feet,  has  a  basement  under  the 
entire  structure  with  a  silo  built  on  the  inside.  In  addition  there  are 
several  smaller  barns  on  the  farm  and  other  buildings.  The  Towles  land 
lies  in  three  townships.  Salt  River,  Cairo  and  Chariton  and  the  brothers 
also  own  the  John  Mason  farm  of  125  acres.  Recently  the  Towles  brothers 
purchased  a  fine  coach  stallion,  "Ulex,"  and  they  hav